Blessed Josè Otín Aquiluè, November 30

November 30, 2009

Blessed Josè Otín Aquiluè, Salesian, Priest and Martyr
Huesca, Spain, December 22, 1901 – Valencia, Spain, November 1936

Roman Martyrology: At Valencia, Spain, Blessed Joseph Otín Aquila, a priest of the Salesian Society and Martyr, who, in the same persecution, reached the heavenly kingdom undefeated in the constancy of faith.

He was born in Huesca on December 22, 1901. He studied in the Salesian Schools. Soon he decided to go to Campello (Alicante), to give answer to his vocation. He was ordained a priest in 1928. His smile had attracted a character that easily linked with young people. Apart from studies in Carabanchel (Madrid), the rest of his life was spent in the province of Alicante: Villena, Campello and Alcoy. When civil war broke out he left for Valencia and found refuge in an inn. He stayed there until he was terminated, then disappeared and he sank into oblivion.

One of the Blessed Spanish Salesian Martyrs of Valencia, he was beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II with 201 other victims of the same persecution.

Source: Salesians

source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Dionysius of the Nativity (Peter Berthelot, Priest) and Redemptus Cross (Thomas Rodriguez) Martyrs, November 29

November 29, 2009

Blessed Dionysius  of the Nativity (Peter Berthelot) and Redemptus Cross (Thomas Rodriguez) Martyrs

December 12, 1600, Honfleur, France – November 29, 1638, Aachen Ca. 1598, Portugal – November 29, 1638, Aachen

Dionysius was born in Honfleur in France December 12, 1600. Cosmographer and captain of ships of the kings of France and Portugal, in 1635 he became a Discalced Carmelite in Goa, where in 1615 he professed as a “talk” Thomas also Rodriguez de Cunha (born 1598), Portuguese, taking the name of the Cross, Redeemed . Mandates on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, November 29, 1638 crowned with martyrdom, near the city of Aachen, their faith in Christ, witnessed steadfastly to the end. They were beatified by Pope Leo XIII June 10, 1900. Read the rest of this entry »


St. Stephen the Younger, November 28

November 28, 2009

St. Stephen the Younger, Monk, Eastern Martyr
Constantinople, 715 – November 28, 764

A Monk of the East, he lived in the eighth century, during the iconoclast period, of which he was a victim and Martyr. Born in Constantinople in 715, Stephen began at first under the direction of a hermit, then entered the monastery of Monte Sant’Aussenzio in Bithynia, where he became Aabbot. Here he lived, praying and doing the job of copying texts. At that time the emperor Constantine Copronymo, the iconoclast in his battle against the sacred images, had aimed particularly at the monks. Following the council of Hiera, which in 753 condemned the defenders of icons, Stephen openly sided against the emperor. This cost him long harassment, imprisonment and abuse. On November 28, 764 Stephen was killed by some officers of the palace at Constantinople, without the order of the emperor.
Read the rest of this entry »


Reclaiming Christmas from the Mall

November 27, 2009

On this Eve of Black Friday, it turns out that there are people who don’t worship at the altar of the retail gods the day after Thanksgiving.

What I find striking about this article, coming from the Catholic tradition, in which Mass is available every day of the week, is that the Unitarians have to have a special service on Black Friday. They have nothing scheduled otherwise. Apparently they just go to church on Sunday and call it good.

Granted, I live in a historically Catholic area, and there are churches with Mass in the morning, convenient for people before work; but there’s a church three blocks from my workplace with 12:10 Mass every day. And there are several in the area with 5:15 pm daily Mass. Sometimes, like Thanksgiving, the schedule is curtailed, and there’s only one Mass and no Confession.

Tomorrow? Many churches with daily Mass will be on their regular schedule. If not? The Cathedral where I live is on its regular schedule. I bet the Basilica is too. If you need a respite from extreme shopping, there’s a Catholic Church near you with Mass, Confession and Adoration.


Blessed Bernardine of Fossa, November 27

November 27, 2009

Saint Bernardine of Fossa, Franciscan Priest

Fossa (L’Aquila), 1421 – L’Aquila, November 27, 1503

Of the Order of Friars Minor, historian and ascetical writer, b. at Fossa, in the Diocese of Aquila, Italy, in 1420; d. at Aquila, 27 November, 1503. Blessed Bernardine belonged to the ancient and noble family of the Amici, and sometimes bears the name of Aquilanus on account of his long residence and death in the town of Aquila. He received his early training at Aquila and thence went to Perugia to study canon and civil law.

On the 12th of March in the year 1445, he received the Seraphic habit from St. James of the Marches who was then preaching a course of Lenten sermons at Perugia. From the time of his entrance into religion, Bernardine never ceased to advance in religious perfection, and the success which crowned his missionary labours throughout Italy, as well as in Dalmatia and Serigonia, bears witness to the eminent sanctity of his life. Bernardine fulfilled the office of provincial of the province of St. Bernardine and of the province of Dalmatia and Bosnia, and would have been chosen Bishop of Aquila had not his humility forbidden him to accept this dignity.

His cult was approved by Leo XII, 26 March, 1828. His feast is kept in the Franciscan Order on the 7th of November. The writings of Blessed Bernardine include several sermons and divers ascetical and historical opuscules; among the latter, the “Chronica Fratrum Minorum Observantiae” deserves special mention. This interesting chronicle was first edited by Leonard Lemmens, O.F.M., from the autograph manuscript, and is prefaced by an interesting life of Blessed Bernardine and a critical estimate of his writings. It may also be mentioned that Bernardine is the author of the first life of his patron, St. Bernardine of Siena.

Source: Catholic Encyclopedia

 


Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, November 26

November 26, 2009

Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, Priest
Porto Maurizio, Imperia, 1676 – Rome, November 26, 1751

It is this saint to whom we owe the credit for having conceived the Via Crucis. Ligure (1676-1751), was the son of a sea captain. Born in Porto Maurizio, Imperia today, he studied in Rome at the Collegio Romano, then entered the retirement of St. Bonaventure, on the Palatine Hill, where he would wear the Franciscan habit. Posted in Corsica by the Pope to restore harmony among the citizens, he was able to obtain, despite the serious divisions among the inhabitants, an unthinkable embrace. The theme of the Cross was at the center of his preaching drew crowds to repentance and Christian piety. Alfonso Maria de Liguori called him “the greatest missionary of our century.”

Roman Martyrology: In Rome in the convent of Saint Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, Priest of the Order of Friars Minor, who, full of love for souls, engaged all his life in preaching, in publishing books of devotion and to visit in over three hundred missions in Rome, Corsica and Northern Italy.

Young Franciscan Leonardo had asked to be a missionary in China. Cardinal Colloredo had replied: “Your China will be Italy.”

And at the end of the seventeenth century, Italy had enough misery and misfortune enough to be considered mission territory.

Leonardo was a student in Rome, when a friend suggested going to hear a sermon. A few steps, they found that a hanged man dangling from the gallows. “This is the sermon,” said the two young men.
A few days later, the son of a sea captain of Porto Maurizio, Liguria, followed by two figures of monks who climbed to the convent of San Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, where he donned the habit of the Franciscans called “the riformella” or “displaced” .

Devoting himself to preaching, perhaps remembering that torture hanging from the gallows, including Leonardo was always in mind the other execution, hanging on the Cross. Therefore, his favorite theme was that of the Via Crucis, typically Franciscan devotion to which he gave the largest spread.

His preaching had something dramatic and tragic, often by torchlight and voluntary torture, which underwent between Leonardo, now placing his hand on the torch lit, now scourging blood.

Immense crowds flocked to hear him and be impressed by his fiery speech, which re-called to repentance and Christian piety. “He is the greatest missionary of our century,”said St. Alphonsus de Liguori. Often, the entire audience, during his sermons, burst into sobs.

He preached throughout Italy, but the region of Tuscany was beaten because of the cold Jansenism, he wanted to fight first of all with the fervor of his heart, then with his themes more effective, namely the Name of Jesus, the Madonna and the Via Crucis.

In a visit to Corsica, the island’s troubled robbers fired their muskets into the air, shouting: “Viva friar Leonardo, long live peace.”

Back in Liguria, was launching a galley, named in his honor, San Leonardo. But he was gravely ill, the sailors said: “The boat is water.”

Consumed by the missionary labors, he was finally recalled to Rome, where, with his impassioned sermons, which also assisted the Pope, he prepared the spiritual climate for the Jubilee of 1750. On that occasion, he planted the Via Crucis at the Colosseum, declaring that place sacred to the martyrs.

Historians have also demonstrated that the Colosseum was never martyred Christians, but the preaching ~ in good faith – of San Leonardo prevented the further destruction of the monument, hitherto regarded as a quarry of good stone.

It was his last effort. He died the following year, and San Bonaventura al Palatino it took the soldiers to hold back the crowd who wanted to see the Holy priest and take away his relics. “We lose a friend on earth – the Pope Lambertini said – but we gain a protector in heaven.”

It was he who suggested the definition of the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception, through consultation letters with all the pastors of the Church.

Source: Parish Archives

Note: The site of the Compagnia di San Leonardo da Porto Maurizio

source: Santi e Beati


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Society of Saint Vincent Ferrier

November 25, 2009

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NOTE TO READERS: If you have any suggestions for orders or communities you feel should be highlighted for TCB’s “Vocations Tuesday” please Contact us! @ ASimpleSinner@gmail.com! Include “VOCATIONS TUESDAY” in the subject line please!


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