Blessed Martin Lumbreras Sanchez Perez Peralta and Melchiorre Sanchez, December 11

December 11, 2009

Blessed Martin Lumbreras Sanchez Perez Peralta and Melchiorre Sanchez, Augustinian Priests and Martyrs
+ Nagasaki, Japan, December 11, 1632

Spanish Blessed Martin of St. Nicholas Lumbreras Peralta, professed priest of the Order of Augustinian Recollects, was Martyred with his brother Melchior of Saint Augustine Sanchez just arrived in the Japanese city of Nagasaki, were closed in a dark cell, and then burnt. John Paul II beatified them April 23, 1989.

Roman Martyrology: At Nagasaki in Japan, and Melchiorre Blessed Martin Lumbreras Peralta Sánchez Pérez, Priests and Martyrs of the Order of Saint Augustine, who just arrived in this city were arrested and thrown into a dark cell, and finally burned at the stake.

Martin was born in Zaragoza Lumbreras a noble family in 1598. He took the habit of an Augustinian convent in Recollet Borja, taking vows in Zaragoza in 1619. Three years later, in July, 1622, he set out from Cadiz to the islands of the Philippines, where he arrived the following year, accompanied by thirteen Augustinian Recollect missionaries. Led to the withdrawal was particularly cloistered and his superiors assigedn him to the convent of Manila, in the first place as sacristan major, then for a period of eight years as novice master. In recent years, he greatly promoted the cult of the Virgin of Pilar, to which he dedicated a picture and an altar in the church of S. Nicola.

His desire was still hidden Japan: live and die for the Christian community, as proven at that time. In a letter dated August 4, 1631 he announced his desire to the vicar general, and exactly one year later, on August 4, 1632, he departed from Manila for Japan in the company of Fr Melchior of Saint Augustine who would be his constant companion until his martyrdom. Both arrived in Nagasaki eight days later.

Melchiorre Sanchez was born in Granada in 1599. At the age of nineteen he professed his religious vows in the convent of Augustinian Recollects of his hometown. In 1621, he departed for the Phillipines in the company of twenty-three other Augustinian Recollect missionaries, arriving in Manila in July of 1622. He learned the Tagalog dialects and Hisaya and exercised the apostolate in the recently opened missions of Mindanao, without a doubt the most difficult of the archipelago. He also spent some time in Manila as a preacher of the Spaniards until August 4, 1632, when he made his desire to go to Japan.

From that moment his life took place beside Martin. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Alexander Briant, December 1

December 1, 2009

Saint Alexander Briant, Jesuit Priest and Martyr

Somerset, England, about 1556 – Tyburn, London, December 1, 1581

Roman Martyrology: In London, England, Saint Edmund Campion, Rodolfo Sherwin and Alexander Briant, priests and martyrs under Queen Elizabeth I, celebrated for their ingenuity and strength in faith. Edmund, who from an early age he professed the Catholic faith, admitted into the Society of Jesus in Rome and was ordained priest in Prague, he returned home, where, for their efforts in comforting the souls of the faithful with his words and his writings , was killed, after many torments, at Tyburn. With him suffered the same torments the saints Rudolph and Alexander, the second of which he obtained in prison to be admitted into the Society of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Dionysius of the Nativity (Peter Berthelot, Priest) and Redemptus Cross (Thomas Rodriguez) Martyrs, November 29

November 29, 2009

Blessed Dionysius  of the Nativity (Peter Berthelot) and Redemptus Cross (Thomas Rodriguez) Martyrs

December 12, 1600, Honfleur, France – November 29, 1638, Aachen Ca. 1598, Portugal – November 29, 1638, Aachen

Dionysius was born in Honfleur in France December 12, 1600. Cosmographer and captain of ships of the kings of France and Portugal, in 1635 he became a Discalced Carmelite in Goa, where in 1615 he professed as a “talk” Thomas also Rodriguez de Cunha (born 1598), Portuguese, taking the name of the Cross, Redeemed . Mandates on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, November 29, 1638 crowned with martyrdom, near the city of Aachen, their faith in Christ, witnessed steadfastly to the end. They were beatified by Pope Leo XIII June 10, 1900. Read the rest of this entry »


St. Stephen the Younger, November 28

November 28, 2009

St. Stephen the Younger, Monk, Eastern Martyr
Constantinople, 715 – November 28, 764

A Monk of the East, he lived in the eighth century, during the iconoclast period, of which he was a victim and Martyr. Born in Constantinople in 715, Stephen began at first under the direction of a hermit, then entered the monastery of Monte Sant’Aussenzio in Bithynia, where he became Aabbot. Here he lived, praying and doing the job of copying texts. At that time the emperor Constantine Copronymo, the iconoclast in his battle against the sacred images, had aimed particularly at the monks. Following the council of Hiera, which in 753 condemned the defenders of icons, Stephen openly sided against the emperor. This cost him long harassment, imprisonment and abuse. On November 28, 764 Stephen was killed by some officers of the palace at Constantinople, without the order of the emperor.
Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Giacomo Meseguer Burillo, November 25

November 25, 2009

 

Blessed Giacomo Meseguer Burillo, Dominican Priest, Martyr
Híjar Meseguer Burillo (Teruel), Spain, 1 May 1885-Barcelona, Spain, date unknown

Roman Martyrology: The blessed Martyr Giacomo Meseguer Burillo, a Dominican Priest, who, in Barcelona, on a day remaining unknown, completed test to the glorious Christ.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001, together with 232 others, a group known as Blessed Spanish Dominicans of Aragon.

source: Santi e Beati

~~~

Note: other sources name him Santiago. I don’t know which is right.  I don’t know where he was buried. I don’t know when he died. I would love to have more information.

Please join me in praying for the repose of his soul.

 

 

 


Blessed Louis de la Pena, November 24

November 24, 2009

Blessed Louis de la Pena, Priest, Martyr, Mercedario
+ November 24, 1599

Of Chilean origin, Blessed Louis de la Pena received his Mercedarian religious training in Chile, professing before the year 1578. Ordained a priest, he held various offices in his province, especially evangelize Araucans and was Commendatore of the convent of Valdivia. In an attack Araucans warriors who entered the night in the convent, Father Luig, awakened after the other men, went down in the church and ate the consecrated hosts, to prevent them from being desecrated. He still had the ciborium in his hand, when the warriors came to the church and killed him with blows of lance and looking for the Blessed Sacrament, they opened his chest and tore his heart out. It was November 24 1599, where his body was burned in the fire of the church and he is considered a Martyr of the Eucharist.

The Order celebrates him on November 24.

source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Michael Augustin Pro, November 23

November 23, 2009

Blessed Miguel Augustin Pro Jesuit Martyr
November 23
Guadeloupe, January 13, 1891 – Mexico City, November 23, 1927


Born in Guadeloupe in 1891, he entered the Society of Jesus in 1911, after two of his sisters had taken the veil. He studied in Nicaragua, Spain and Belgium, where he was ordained a priest in 1925. Back in Mexico, he carried out his mission in a period of persecution against the Church. In 1927 he was wrongly accused of being part of a plot to kill a general candidate for president. After a farcical trial, he was shot. To his funeral, defying prohibitions, rushed 20 thousand people. He was beatified on September 25, 1988 by Pope John Paul II, together with other Mexican Martyrs of Persecution. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Giordano Ansalone, November 17

November 17, 2009

Saint Giordano Ansalone, Dominican Priest, Martyr
Santo Stefano Quisquina (Agrigento), 1 November 1598 – Nagasaki (Japan), November 17, 1634

In 1625, he reached Seville on foot, he left for the missions. After a break of about a year in Mexico, across the Pacific in the summer of 1626, he reached the Philippine Islands. First two years costs between the Philippines, Cagayan in northern Luzon, then lived for four years among the Chinese of a colony of the suburb of Binondo, Manila, in the Parish and the Hospital S. Gabriel, built for them. Studied the language, the mentality and customs from the Chinese, showing true forerunner of inculturation and dialogue with non-believers. To do this he also wrote an opera, hopelessly lost, which compiled the main religious beliefs and philosophical ideas of the Chinese, discussing them with the data of faith and Catholic doctrine, for an enlightening comparison. In 1632, the midst of this persecution, he went to Japan, disguised as a merchant, to bring aid and comfort: for a year he was the Vicar Provincial of this mission. Seriously ill on the island of Kyushu, “he implored the Virgin Mary to be cured until they had killed Christ.” He was jailed August 4, 1634 and subjected to unspeakable torture.

source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Hugh Faringdon (Cook), John Eynon and John Rugg, November 15

November 15, 2009

Blessed Hugh Faringdon (Cook), John Eynon and John Rugg

Blessed Hugh Faringdon (Cook), John Eynon and John Rugg Martyrs
m. Reading, United Kingdom, November 15, 1539

The Martyrologium Romanum commemorates today the three Benedictine Blessed Hugh Faringdon (Cook), Abbot of Reading, John Eynon and John Ruggie, Priests. Tenaciously opposed to the claims of King Henry VIII of England within the spiritual domain and therefore were falsely accused of conspiracy. Front of the monastery were then hanged and then horribly gutted. Pope Leo XIII beatified them on May 13, 1895.

Roman Martyrology: At Reading in Britain, Martyrs Hugh Cook Faringdon, Abbot of the Order of St. Benedict, John Eynon and John Ruggie, Priests who were accused of treason for being fiercely opposed to the claims of primacy in the Church of King Henry VIII died hanged and disemboweled with a sword in front of the monastery.

In 1534 the English clergy was called to take an oath of supremacy recognizing the monarch as head of the English Church in the territory of the kingdom. With the exception of Saints Thomas More and John Fisher, the Carthusian monks and Observant Franciscans, a few others immediately objected to this betrayal of the pope. The abbots of Glastonbury, Reading and Colchester all lent oath with their monks, hoping to thereby protect their ancient monasteries from the tyranny of kings, but all three reached a point of no return when it intensified the suppression of monastic orders.

The Abbot of Reading, Hugh Faringdon was commonly called by the name of his county of origin and his nickname was Cook. In this abbey he became Monaco and was elected abbot in 1250, very high office that entitled the holder to a seat in the House of Lords and the Council, as the magistrate of the county. The reporters called him a man hostile to him “completely without culture,” yet the teacher of elementary school in Reading dedicated a book to him even in rhetoric. Hugh also managed to enforce discipline in his monastery excellent.

Strongly opposed the preachers of new doctrines Protestants, whom he described as “heretics and scoundrels, but was on good terms with King Henry VIII, perhaps for convenience, given the proximity between the Abbey and Windsor. They used to exchange visits and gifts. Hugh also tried in vain to help the King to obtain from the Pope the annulment of the marriage to Catherine of Aragon, by signing the letter of request. In 1536, also signed the Act of Supremacy and the following year still enjoyed the sympathy of the king, as he held an important role in the funeral of Queen Jane Seymour.

A few weeks later, a diplomatic incident occurred: Abbot Hugh offended the sovereign, spread the false news of his death. He wuestioned by a committee, but was later released. After he was taken to the suppression of monastic orders, as Hugh does not accept this soppruso summer of 1539 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, accused of treason. With him were tried John Eynon, a priest of the church of St Giles in Reading, and John Ruggie, the prebend of Chichester, who had retired in the abbey of Reading. The former was accused of having written and distributed a copy of the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536, while the latter possessed a relic of the hands of Saint Anastasius, while knowing that his majesty had sent inspectors in the said abbey to put an end to the idolatry . However, there is certainty that these two priests were Benedictine monks.

Terms prosecuting coinvoltse all three are unknown, but easily imaginable. Abbot Hugh spoke very clearly on the gallows in his opinion the supremacy of the Holy See in spiritual matters was “the common faith of those who had the right to declare the true teachings of the English Church.” Their execution took place outside the abbey of Reading November 15, 1539.
Hugh Faringdon (Cook), abbot of Reading, John Eynon and John Rugg were Beatified by Pope Leo XIII, May 13, 1895 by confirmation of their cults.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Saints Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne, November 14

November 14, 2009

St. Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne

Saints Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne Franciscan Priests, Martyrs
† Jerusalem, November 14, 1391

Roman Martyrology: In Jerusalem, the Holy Nicholas Tavelic, Deodato Aribert, Stephen of Cuneo and Peter of Narbonne, Priests of the Order of Friars Minor and Martyrs who were burned in the fire for preaching boldly in the public square in front of the Saracens, the Christian religion, professing Strongly Christ Son of God
Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Peter Vicev, Pavel (Joseph) Džidžov and Josaphat (Robert Matthew) Shishkov. November 13

November 13, 2009

Blessed Peter Vicev, Pavel (Joseph) Džidžov and Jehoshaphat (Robert Matthew) Shishkov

Blessed Pavel Djidjov, Priest and Martyr
Plovdiv, Bulgaria, July 19, 1919 – Sofia, Bulgaria, November 12, 1952

Roman Martyrology: At Sofia, Bulgaria, Blessed Peter Vicev, Pavel (Joseph) Džidžov and Jehoshaphat (Robert Matthew) Shishkov, priests of the Congregation of the Augustinians of the Assumption, who, unjustly accused of treason under an atheist regime and thrown into prison because they were Christians, in their mortal combat deserve to receive the reward of eternity, the faithful disciples of Christ.

Joseph Dzjidzjov was born in the Bulgarian town of Plovdiv July 19, 1919, to a Catholic family in the Latin rite. In 1926 he became a student of School of the Assumption St. Andrew in his native country. From 1931 to 1938 he studied in the College of St. Augustine, in the same city. On February 2, 1938 as a trainee recruit, he finally entered Noseroa, France, and assumed the religious name of Pavel.
He studied philosophy and theology in Lormoa, near Paris, until 1942, when he made his perpetual profession of vows.

Then forced by illness to return to Bulgaria, he continued his theological studies as an irregular student. On January 26, 1945 in Plovdiv, he was ordained a priest in the Latin rite. To Varna he was then sent, to study economics and social sciences, in order to delegations following the various activities relating to housing and economic management of the mission. Father Pavel, a very good student and active, exerted a positive influence on his comrades. With courage, he didn’t hide his anti-communist ideas and beliefs and then, for this reason, was kept firmly under control by the secret services of Bulgaria’s new leadership.

His superiors then entrusted him with the job of treasurer of the College St. Augustine in Plovdiv and later treasurer of the Eastern Vicariate. Constantly followed by the communist militia during the night of July 4, 1952, he was arrested in seminary recruitment of Plovdiv, together with Father Kamen Vicev. Pavel Dzjidjov figured second in the list of complaints.

For him and his brothers Kamen Vitchev and Josaphat Chichkov the death sentence was issued October 3, 1952, and were shot in the night between 11 and November 12, 1952 in Sofia, Bulgarian capital, along with Blessed Bishop Eugenio Bossilkov. The place of their burial in the cemetery of the city has never been discovered. The three priest martyrs were beatified by Pope John Paul II May 26, 2002.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Vincent Eugene Bossilkov, November 11

November 11, 2009

Blessed Vincent Eugene Bossilkov

Blessed Vincent Eugene Bossilkov, Passionist Bishop and Martyr
Belene (Bulgaria), November 16, 1900 – Sofia (Bulgaria), November 11, 1952

Vincenzo was born in Belene (Bulgaria) in 1900. His family belonged to the Latin-rite Catholic minority in the Diocese of Nicopolis. At 11 he was sent to Ores, to the school of the Passionist Fathers. Hence his vocation which would be planted with ten years of study in Belgium and Holland. He joined the congregation with the name of Eugene and became a priest in Bulgaria. He then went again to Rome. Returning home he waived all diocesan duties to devote himself to what he feels like his true mission: to explain the cross to the peasants in their language. In 1944 he was appointed Bishop of Nicopolis, in one state (the fledgling People’s Republic of obedience under Stalin) against religion. Still unable to come to Rome in 1948 when asked by Pope Pius XII. Then began the mechanism of seizures, evictions, orders to match a ‘national church’ vassal of a scheme, asked to repudiate the Pope. But Eugene was opposed. This caused his arrest in July 1952, torture, mock trial, death sentence and murder in the prison of Sofia, in secret. His body was thrown into a common grave. Pope John Paul II beatified him on March 15, 1998.

Roman Martyrology: At Sofia, Bulgaria, Blessed Vincent Eugene Bossilkov, Bishop of Nicopolis’ and Martyr of the Congregation of the Passion of Jesus, who, under a tyrannical regime, was led to jail for refusing to renounce communion with Rome and cruelly tortured, was condemned to death on charges of treason and then shot.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Thomas Jihyoe of St. Augustine, November 6

November 6, 2009

Blessed Thomas Jinhoe

Blessed Thomas Jihyoe of St. Augustine,Augustinian, Priest, Martyr
Nagasaki, Japan, 1600 – November 6, 1637

Thomas Jihyoe, Augustinian Japanese, during the anti-Christian persecution during the seventeenth century, for 5 years with the nom de guerre “Kintsuba” held in check the soldiers of the emperor who tried to capture him because he was Catholic.He was born in Omura, Nagasaki around 1600, his parents were both catechists and died martyrs for the faith. As a child he attended the Jesuit school in Arima, but the school was closed because of persecution so he went to Macao to finish his studies. On an Augustinian missionary, since 1622, he moved to Manila in the Philippines and made his religious profession in the convent of St. Augustine Intramuros in 1624, then to Cebu to take up his theological studies. On completion of training he was ordained to the Priesthood. In the meantime persecution raged in Japan and the missionaries were falling one by one under the relentless blows of the persecutors, leaving the Catholic communities abandoned. Thomas felt that his place was in his country and, after several attempts, followed by as many shipwrecks, in 1631 was able to return to Nagasaki. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Julian Nakaura, October 21

October 21, 2009

Blessed Julian Nakura

Blessed Julian Nakaura, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Nakaura, Japan, ca. 1567 – Nishizaki, Japan, October 21, 1633

Jesuit Priest, native of Japan, Julian Nakaura was martyred in his homeland in the context of fierce waves of persecution against Christians. Following a rapid process started with the green light by the Holy See granted on 2 September 1994, his Martrydom was recognized on July 1, 2007 and he was beatified on November 24, 2008, during the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI, together with 187 other Japanese Martyrs.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Isaac Jogues, October 18

October 19, 2009

Saint Isaac Jogues

Saint Isaac Jogues, Priest and Martyr
Orléans, France, January 10, 1607 – Ossernenon, Canada, October 18, 1646

He was born January 10, 1607 at Orleans in France. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and in 1636, after receiving ordination, he was sent to North America to evangelize indigenous peoples. Hhe went to the Great Lakes, where he lived for six years always exposed to various dangers. In 1642, Isaac Jogues, Rene Goupil and coadjutor with the forty Hurons, fell into an ambush stretched by the Iroquois. They were all tortured and savagely mutilated. The night they put them on the floor, naked and chained, and pour over them hot coals and ashes. Jogues was transferred to Albany, where the merchants Dutch Calvinists helped him to escape. He returned to France. But in 1644 the missionary departed for Canada. Two years later he was shot in the neck and decapitated. There were eight Jesuit Martyrs in North America, all Beatified in 1925 and Canonized in 1930 by Pope Pius XI.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Ossernenon in Canada, the passion of St. Isaac Jogues, Jesuit Priest and Martyr, who was enslaved by some pagans and had his fingers mutilated, then died with his head smashed by a blow of the ax.

More information about St. Isaac may be found here.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Anicet Adalbert Koplinski, October 16

October 16, 2009

KOPLINSKI1KOPLINSKI2KOPLINSKI3

Blessed Anicet Adalbert (Wojciech Anicet) Koplinski, Priest and Martyr
Debrzyno, Poland, July 30, 1875 – Auschwitz, Poland, October 16, 1941

Father Aniceto (born Wojciech Koplinski), Capuchin priest born in Debrzyno (Poland) on July 30, 1875, while the Polish homeland was in the hands of German invaders, were deported to the concentration camp of Auschwitz where they died entrrambi October 16, 1941, the first in the gas chamber and the second killed by the captors instead of the field.

And from the end of a life that often receives its light. This finding is doubly true for a man who, on June 13, 1999 in Warsaw was proclaimed blessed by Pope John Paul II during his eighth trip to Poland. This man would have remained unknown had he not come to the altars. But his story sheds yet another light in both dark chapter of German history this century. And even in human affairs, its purpose was obvious who and for what is experienced.

We’re talking about Anicet Koplinski, a Capuchin who so far escaped the chronicles of the world. Born June 30, 1875 in Preußisch-Friedland (now Gmina Debrzno) in the province of West Prussia in Germany,  a city bordering with Poland where he was also a strong presence in Poland.

Strong relations in particular, were among the few German Catholics in the area and the group of Poles, mainly because of their common Catholic faith, which gave them the opportunity to participate in the same liturgies and also share the same jobs. The small Adalbert, the name that was imposed in baptism, was the youngest of 12 brothers, a far from wealthy family who made their living with the father’s salary worker. Adalbert, or simply Albert, as everyone called him, also met the Capuchins known at that time for their social apostolate and also had direct experience with them in his youth. On November 23, 1893 he came back in the Capuchin convent in Sigolsheim nell’Alsazia (in Prussia all the Capuchin monastery had been suppressed) belonging to the province Rhine-Westphalia, and received the name of Aniceto (invincible).

The day of the Assumption in 1900 he was ordained a priest and then to perform his ministry primarily in Dieburg, then along in the Ruhr (Werne, Sterkrade, Krefeld) as assistant to the Polish people. At home, he actually had a little Polish study now improved and he had personally during the years of study, using even after the period of leave at his sister who lived in Poland to spend time in a Polish environment. In his apostolate in the Ruhr area his knowledge of the Polish language was very useful, as well as its origin from a family of laborers. He could understand working people, and vice versa, they understood him. This emotional closeness to Poland, did not diminish his love for Germany; he was a man of the frontier, but also a patriot. At the beginning of the outbreak of World War I he composed a poem for the war, compositions that embarrass us today. But even this later put his poetic ability to serve the poor who increasingly became the only goal of his pastoral work.

The turning point in the life of Fr Aniceto was in 1918 in Krefeld when he was given the request to make himself available for the reorganization of church life and the Order in Warsaw. Enthusiastically he accepted this challenge. After long years of Tsarist rule, Poland had regained its freedom. But the economic situation was disastrous, and many were poor and families living in poverty. Nor were there a great many rich, as we see today in different situations in countries such as Brazil, Mexico, India. P. Aniceto became a mediator between these two groups. Without asking anything for himself, always with his poor habit and sandals, he was seen walking the streets of Warsaw to beg for the poor. And what he could get was pinned into the deep pockets of his coat: bread, sausage, fruit, vegetables, sweets for the children. Often he carried it upon his shoulders, or dragged heavy parcels or large suitcases full of basic necessities. On January 25, 1928 he wrote to his provincial Father Ignatius Ruppert, “A particular challenge, which is often a heavy work for me are the many poor and many people here without work for which nearly every day I go out for alms.” He was described as “St. Francis of Warsaw.”

It is not far from the truth if one interprets his work as an alms for the poor as an expression of sporting activity.

Since his youth he had practiced daily lifting of weights. At the prayer of midnight, a tradition that every monk began in the novitiate, he, before the prayer or after returning to the room, he practiced in his specialty. His perseverance led him to a big muscle power so he could do extraordinary things with the joy of his brothers or for the benefit of the poor or even of pastoral service. So he set up tables and benches or showed his skills in the village fairs and then go with the “hat” (skullcap), asking for a reward for the poor. It is said that a police officer who acted violently with his wife and his children, despite his repeated confessions, was unable to improve his aggressive character. One day father Aniceto took him to the sacristy, grabbed his belt and lifted it above his head shouting, “See what you can, and what God will do with you if you continue to be so violent?”. The lesson was effective, the policeman broke free from his violence.

When Father Anicet was not around for the poor, he often sat in the confessional of the Capuchin Church in Warsaw. Each morning he began to take confessions one hour before the Mass and remained there for the next hour, and again in the evening, when he returned to the convent from his begging. He did this work more readily than preach, request that the latter was addressed only infrequently by the superior, because of his limited knowledge of Polish.

For many priests who came to his confessional he gave brief but very effective warnings in Latin, he was chosen as confessor Gawlina Gall and by the bishops, and even by the cardinal and the papal nuncio Kakowski Achille Ratti, the future Pope Pius XI. Normally required to do penance as alms for the poor, penance also given to Cardinal Kakowski which ordered him to donate during the winter time a car of coal for a poor family.

Father Aniceto took care of the soul and the body of others. Asked the rich for bread for the poor, but called the poor to pray for themselves and for the rich “before God takes responsibility for each other. Of great significance was seen in front of his confessiona:: army officers next to the peasants, elegant women near poor widows. The Capuchin had the same love for all. The news that someone was dying made him run to his bedside to comfort him and bring him the sacraments of confession and communion. And if someone died, abandoned by all, he took care of the burial. He often took part in the funeral rites and procession to the cemetery, praying his breviary on the road or the rosary, and sometimes it happened that so great was his immersion in God that he did notice the entry of the cemetery as the procession moved beyond Funeral turn toward the cemetery.
Aniceto Koplinski was of German nationality. He did not hide it, even when the politics of Hitler had begun to be unacceptable. When he was arguing with his brother he often beat his fists against the table talking about the political events in Germany. He saw and understood the spirit of National Socialism and its anti-Christian demonic vision of the world. Aniceto could not come to terms with this current policy. Having experienced since his youth, honesty and faith of the Polish people, he could not stand on their side, to assume, motivated by a radical solidarity, the name of Koplinski. During the first week of German occupation in Poland, he remained in the convent. But soon he was seen engaged in providing assistance to its poor and even those who had to flee because of Nazi violence. From the Germans, using his knowledge of German, he obtained the necessary permits to obtain food, clothing, shoes and medicine. The father Koplinski also strove for non-Catholic Christians and Jews, as testified by the Archbishop Niemira.

For the Gestapo and the Capuchins in particular p. Koplinski were smoke and mirrors. Ascension Day of 1941 took place the first interrogation. The Capuchin Prussian, without fear and frankly, as was his custom, expressed a very heavy thought: “After what Hitler did to Poland, I am ashamed to be a German.” The Capuchin Father could have saved his life, if he had appealed to his German citizenship. This way out, then that would have contradicted the sincerity and spirit of sacrifice that marked his person. The fact is that on June 28, 1941, the day after the air strike in Warsaw, he was arrested along with 20 other brothers and thrown into prison Pawiak. The reason for the arrest was to have read propaganda sheet antinazionalsocialisti and expressing ideas contrary to the new regime.

After he wasrrested his hair and beard were shaved, and even stripped of his religious clothing, but he was allowed to retain his breviary. The Father Superior and Fr Aniceto were tortured to force them to incriminate others, but could not tear their admission that he had incited people to rebellion against the regime. He remained faithful to hisvocation as a religious and a priest, even in the face of threats and reprisals, it is faith openly declared during interrogation: “I am a priest and wherever there are men, I am working: whether they are Jews, Poles, and especially if the suffering and poor. “

On September 3 they were all loaded into a cattle car to be transported to Auschwitz, where they received the much infamous striped jacket and a number of prisoners. Human dignity had been snatched from them; they were among thousands of prisoners to be reduced to a number. At 66, P. Aniceto was used in the block of the disabled, which in turn was close to that of the intended extermination. We do not know very well what he had to endure harassment and abuse during the five weeks that followed, but we are a bit ‘reconstructed from the stories reported that the survivors. We have, however, the direct testimony of his Provincial and fellow prisoner Father Archangel, who said that “Fr Aniceto, newly arrived at the entrance of the camp, was beaten because he could not keep pace with the others, beyond that, he was even bitten by a dog in the SS. During the call the Capuchin monk was put together older people and those who could not work and placed in the block close to that of being destined to death. Throughout this period of suffering Fr Anicet prayed and kept quiet, keeping constant the peace and quiet. “

This testimony is sufficient to make us see that the Capuchin Father, often after having celebrated the Via Crucis and helped others to carry their cross behind Jesus lived this tragic moment of his life to Jesus and united as a painful path to Golgotha. One who not so long ago he had shouted to defend the poor and condemn the sin, now remained silent and prayed. Before being led to the gas chamber, he said to a friend: “We drink to the bottom of the cup.”

On 16 October the captors set up after a short trial, threw Fr Anicet along with other prisoners in a pit and threw them lime, and a painful death, because the lime gives off a violent corrosive activity on living bodies to consume like fire.

After having lived poor and he had undertaken for the poor, Aniceto Koplinski met his maker, dying in absolute poverty.

On the outside was also stripped of everything of the flesh, but inside was filled with a treasure that nobody ever would have been able to wrest faith, dignity and loving attention to others. He died in the hope of resurrection and faith that his suffering and cruel death is an aid to reconcile the divided soul of Germany and Poland, the Jews and the Christians, Catholics and Protestants, the poor and the rich.

Source: The Holy See


Saint Innocenzo Canoura Arnau, October 9

October 9, 2009

Saint Innocenzo Canoura Arnau

Saint Innocenzo Canoura Arnau, Priest and Martyr
March 10, 1887 in St. Lucia del Valle de Oro (Lugo) Spain-Turon, Spain, October 9, 1934


Emanuele Canoura Arnau, born March 10, 1887 in St. Lucia del Valle de Oro (Lugo) Spain; as a teenager he felt the call to the religious state and at 18 became part of the Passionist Congregation, founded by St. Paul of the Cross in the eighteenth century, because since childhood he was devoted to the Virgin, he wanted to take the name of Innocent Immaculate, when he made his religious profession July 27, 1905.

He studied with great profit theology, philosophy and other ecclesiastical sciences, and was ordained September 20, 1913. Almost immediately he was committed by superiors to train new missionaries preaching, passion and, most of his life, went on to teach young students in the various Passionist Community of the Province of the Most Precious Blood of Madrid.

Being a member of the community of Mieres (Asturias), October 4, 1934 superiors demanded his willingness to admit pupils of the Brothers of Christian Schools in the nearby town of Turon. In that year there were the first signs of that great carnage, which was the Spanish Civil War, which devastated parts of the country from 1936 to 1939.

The victims of 7300 were more religious, but already in 1934 there was the Revolution of Asturias region of northern Spain, ranging from the Cantabrian Mountains to the Bay of Biscay, and 5 October 1934 the revolutionary atheists penetrated into the college of the Brothers of the Schools Christian Turon, capturing eight of the students and religious, the more the father Innocent Canoura Arnau, who arrived the day before to confess.

After several days of imprisonment and great hardship and suffering, in which the father Passionist, one priest, worked to comfort the others, almost all young, and without trial, were shot in hatred of the Faith, October 9, 1934 the cemetery of Turon.

The horror of their sacrifice innocent, not enough in there to two years to stop the great persecution against the Spanish Church.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II April 19, 1990, Canonized November 21, 1999.

Author: Antonio Borrelli

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Jose Canet Giner, October 4

October 4, 2009

Blessed Jose Canet Giner

Blessed Jose Canet Giner, Priest and Martyr
October 4

Roman Martyrology: Near the town of Gandia in the same territory in Spain, Blessed Jose Canet Giner, Priest and Martyr, who for his loyalty to Christ deserved to be associated with the sacrifice of the Savior. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo, October 3

October 3, 2009

Blessed Crescenzio Garcia PoboBlessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo, Priest and Martyr
April 15, 1903 Ccladas (Teruel)-October 3, 1936


Garcia Pobo, Crescenzo was born April 15 1903 Ccladas (Teruel), In 1927 he made his perpetual vows and was ordained a priest September 16 ,1928. He carried out the apostolate among children in various rehabilitative centers. Religious smiling, simple and humble, he distinguished himself for his generous dedication to youth in distress. He was with a group of eight who were surprised by the militia in the Reformatory S. Rita Madrid and locked in the manager. Aware of the imminence of death, a witness said: “We made a collective act of contrition, and we took each other absolution. There was a profound silence. ” Released through the intervention of the President of the juvenile court, they were again arrested and killed on dates and places of Madrid.

Roman Martyrology: At Madrid in Spain, blessed Crescenzo Pobo Garcia, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of the hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, who, during the persecution against the faith, shed his blood for Christ.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs, Spanish Tertiary Capuchins, 19 Spanish members of the Congregation of Our Lady of Sorrows Capuchin Tertiary (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigo y Rerrer, and a sister, also a Capuchin Tertiary, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). The cause of canonization of these twenty religious Martyrs was conducted at the archidiocese of Valencia together with seven other cases relating to as many cases of the martyrdom of members of different religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these causes, May 13, 1997 the Positio super martyrdom was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. These 20 religious Martyrs were Beatified as part of the 233 Blessed Spanish Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II.

Author: Agripino Gonzalez


Source:
Santi e Beati

Blessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo

Blessed Enrique Saiz Aparicio, October 2

October 2, 2009

Enrico Saiz Aparicio

Blessed Enrique Saiz Aparicio, Salesian Priest and Martyr
Ubierna December 1, 1889 – Carabachel Alto (Madrid), October 2, 1936

He was born in Ubierna (Burgos) on December 1, 1889 and was baptized the following day. At 16, feeling the inclination to the religious and priestly life, he was admitted to the novitiate of Sarrià (Barcelona) and professed September 5, 1909. He was ordained at Salamanca, July 28, 1918. It was his field of apostolate colleges of Campello, Barcelona, Madrid and Salamanca, he was Director of Salamanca in Madrid, and then the student Theological Carabanchel Alto (Madrid), where he was surprised by the revolution. He distinguished himself for piety, zeal and dedication to the priesthood. Was more cautious, fatherly and understanding, while requiring the fulfillment of duty, which he gave the example. With sustained effort and continuous gained great amiability, constancy of character and spirit of mortification. Back in 1934, feeling closer to the revolution, he was preparing the minds of his martyrdom. On July 20, 1936 the House of Carabanchel Alto was attacked by militants. Don Enrique offered to die for everyone, but his offer was not accepted. All were jailed and destined for death. Then put back in freedom, the Servant of God sought a shelter for each and continued his interest in the fate of all. October 2, 1936, the militia, knowing the Priest, imprisoned him, and around 10 in the evening shot him. He was Beatified October 28, 2007.

In the vast inhuman massacre that was the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the number of victims exceeded one million, striking persons of every class and every faith. By now, historians have recognized that within this terrible massacre, in the territories then called “red zone” in the hands of anarchists and the social community, there was a real persecution against Christians. The lay faithful only because Christians, were killed tens of thousands massacred and 4148 diocesan priests, 12 bishops, 283 nuns, 2365 religious (priests and brothers) for a total so far acknowledged that martyrs 6808 with destruction of many churches. Religious Every family gave its toll with a more or less high number of victims: the family of the Salesians of Don Bosco in this list is present with 97 members, belonging to three flourishing ‘ provinces’ of the Salesians and a ‘inspectors’ of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, divided as follows: 39 priests, 26 assistants, 22 clerks, 5 Salesian cooperators, 3 prospective Salesians and the Daughters of Mary Help. Salesian Martyrs are grouped into three local families: Valencia, Seville and Madrid. Those of Valencia were declared blessed in 2001.


The group of 42 martyrs of Madrid, is the largest headed by Salesian priest, Don Enrique Saiz Aparicio, who was born in the Ubierna on December 1, 1889 in the province of Burgos. He spent his childhood amid significant family difficulties, which affected the formation of his character, after having attended Salesian studying some houses, he made his first profession in 1909 in Barcelona – Sarria. After his studies in philosophy, he alternated his job as an educator between Salamanca and Madrid, excelling in literary qualities and no lack of evidence and concerns because of his tough character, even though he went dominating as he came closer to priestly ordination, which he received in 1918. There followed six years of intense activity between Salesian always Salamanca and Madrid, and was later first director of the College of Salamanca, and then those Carabauchel and Atocha in Madrid. His character changed completely becoming hard serene, charitable; he intensified his ascetic preparation, his spiritual direction, his inner life, his preaching in particular Eucharistic-Marian. And in the task of animating the Community and the aspirant Salesian Carabachel Alto on the outskirts of Madrid, he was surprised by the outbreak of the Civil War. Father Enrico Saiz Aparicio for some time seemed to have the martyrdom, in fact he told his brother: If God wanted me to Mars, back one step in front of the divine will; I will accept martyrdom with serenity . On the afternoon of July 20, 1936, The aspirant was stormed by gunmen red; Father Saiz gathered the kids in the hall and gave them his blessing Mary Help of Christians, then waved a white handkerchief headed toward the attackers, saying: “If you want blood, here I am. But you do not harm the boys. The aspirants were returned to their families and father and eight Salesians Saiz, with the usual tactics of the militia, were left free to be re-arrested outside the house and then eliminated one by one. Don Enrique Saiz was executed October 2, 1936, aged 47, the other Salesian martyrs, mostly young novices and students to Mohernando, were arrested during those six months at the end of 1936 and killed in varying days and places, a large group died December 6 1936. The blood of martyrs is the seed of new Christians and in the next 40 years, the Salesian Family, underwent a very large flowering of vocations to Salesian in Spain. The process for beatification of the 42 Salesian Martyrs in Madrid, began on December 7, 1957. Recently, this case was merged with that of the group of martyrs Salesians of Seville, formerly called Servant of God Antonio Luque and 20 Torrero comrades. The new joint process, thus including all 63 Martyrs Salesian in Madrid and Seville.


The beatification ceremony took place in Rome on 28 October 2007, under the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI.

Author: Antonio Borrelli

Source: Santi e Beati


Jean-Nicolas Cordier, September 30

September 30, 2009

Martyr Palm Fronds

Blessed Jean-Nicolas Cordier, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Saint-André, France, December 3, 1710 – Rochefort, France, September 30, 1794


Roman Martyrology: On the French coast in the sea off Rochefort, Blessed John Nicholas Cordier, Priest and Martyr who, after the abolition of the Society of Jesus carried out his priestly ministry in the territory of Verdun, until, during the French Revolution, threw for priest in a galley at anchor, died of diseased lethal starvation. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed José Villanova, September 29

September 29, 2009

Blessed José Villanova

Blessed José Villanova, Priest and Martry

Turís Tormo (Valencia) January 20, 1902-Madrid, September 29, 1936

Blessed José Villanova was born in Turís Tormo (Valencia) January 20, 1902 and was baptized two days later. He took his vows in Carabanchel Alto (Madrid) on 25 July 1920, and in 1929 was ordained a priest and spent teaching. He had a long but fruitful apostolate is not, is that in Salamanca in Madrid. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Marco Criado, September 25

September 25, 2009

Blessed Marco Criado

Blessed Marco Criado, Martyr of Andujar
Andújar, Spain, April 25, 1522-September 25, 1569, La Peza, Spain

Roman Martyrology: On the Alpujarras mountains near Granada in Spain in Al, Bl Marco Criado, Priest of the Most Holy Trinity for the liberation of slaves and martyr who was killed by the Moors.

He was born in Andújar, Spain, April 25, 1522. Clever, he distinguished himself early, while still a child among his fellow students, especially learning the Christian doctrine. In 1536 he embraced the Trinitarian Order in his hometown, where he made even the philosophical and theological studies. Ordained a Priest, he exercised the sacred ministry of the word to Andújar in Jaen and Ubeda. Obedience destined him, then, a missionary of the Diocese of Guadix and the surrounding region, a stronghold of the Muslims.


His zeal for the glory of God and the salvation of souls was tireless. After a brief stop in La Peza as chaplain, walking, alone and in a thousand dangers, the towns and villages of the rugged hills dell’Alpujarras everywhere to comfort the weak in faith, to correct manners, flush the good, and exposing confusing the perverse. At La Peza was slapped, insulted and beaten, in the Sierra de los Filabres he was for two days tied to a tree in Cadiar, he escaped the fury of his foes down in a basket making from the window of his guest. Abhencota, one of the most ferocious animals died, bound him to the tail of a horse and dragged him ten leagues.


At the outbreak of the revolt of the Moors dell’Alpujarras, Blessed Marco Criado was the first victim. Conducted, including beatings and insults, not far from La Peza, was tied to an oak, where he stayed three days, singing hymns and praying to God for his killers. Died, finally, stoned September 25, 1569. La Peza reveres him as its patron, the Alpujarras his apostle, the Trinitarian Order one of its most authentic children. His worship from time immemorial was solemnly confirmed by Pope Leo XIII July 24, 1899. His feast is celebrated on September 25.

Author: Placido della Vergine


Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski, September 8

September 8, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski, Priest and Martyr
My_latycze, Ukraine, January 6, 1908 – Gross-Rosen, Germany, September 8, 1944


Blessed Wladyslaw Bladzinski, priest of the Congregation of St. Michael the Archangel, was born in My_latycze, Ukraine, January 6, 1908 and died at Gross-Rosen, Germany, September 8, 1944. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In Gross-Rosen locations in Germany, Bladzinski Blessed Ladislaus, a priest of the Congregation of St. Michael and martyr, at the same time the enemies of the Church deported from his native Poland in a stone quarry, where he was later killed.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. Stephen Pongracz, September 7

September 7, 2009

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice, Jesuit and Martyr
Alvincz, Romania, around 1582 – Kosice, Slovakia, September 7, 1619

Roman Martyrology: In the Carpathian mountains, in Košice, Slovakia today, holy martyr Stephen Pongracz, priest of the Society of Jesus, could not be lead to deny their Catholic faith by hunger, nor the torture of the wheel and fire.

Scion of the Hungarian nobility, he was born in 1582 in the castle Alvincz in Transylvania. After classical studies in his native land and in the Jesuit College in Cluj (Romania today) he entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus in Brno, in 1602. Then he continued his studies in philosophy and theology in Prague to Graz Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Gentile Matelica, September 5

September 5, 2009

Blessed Gentile Matelica

Blessed Gentile Matelica
Matelica, Macerata, 1290 – Tauris, September 5, 1340

He was a Franciscan missionary in Egypt, then in Asia Minor, Persia and Armenia. The Doge Marco Corsaro transferred his relics to the Church of the Frari in Venice.

Blessed Gentile was born in 1290 to the noble family of Finaguerra Matelica (MC). Attracted by the ideal Franciscan finn as a child, he became a priest, and devoted his life to works of the apostolate in the various regions of Italy.

With a desire to imitate St. Francis, he withdrew into solitude and penance on the holy mountain of La Verna in Tuscany, where he was destined for his virtues repeatedly to drive the brothers. After this intense spiritual preparation, he went to ground mission in Egypt, but here the difficulties in learning the Arabic language seemed so insurmountable that he decided to return home. The Lord helped him in a surprising way, and was soon able to speak not only Arabic, but also the languages of neighboring countries. Thus he was able to bring the proclamation of the Gospel to Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula, to the Holy Places in Turkey and Persia. Through lively and vibrant preaching, accompanied by many miracles, he produced thousands of conversions and baptisms. This aroused the anger of Muslims, who could not bear that so many people embraced Christianity, during a sermon in the territory of Tauris and was assaulted with a blow of the scimitar, which beheaded him. It was September 5, 1340. Part of his body, much revered by Christians of these regions, was requested by the browser and Venetian merchant Nicolo Quirini and transported by ship to Venice, where he was placed in the basilica of Santa Maria Gloriosa is venerated to this day.

Pius VI February 2, 1795 granted to celebrate the festival on September 5.

Author: Elisabeth Nardi

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Claude Bochot, September 3

September 3, 2009

Blessed Claude Bochot

Blessed Claude Bochot, Priest and Martyr

Troyes, France, July 10, 1720 – Seminary of Saint-Firmin, Paris, September 3, 1792

Claude Bochot, professed priest of the Fathers of Christian Doctrine, was martyred during the French Revolution. He was beatified by Pope Pius XI October 17, 1926 together with 190 other victims of that persecution.

Bochot Claude, born in Troyes in France July 10, 1720, entered the Congregation of the Fathers of Christian Doctrine under the patronage of St. Charles  October 10, 1740, made his religious profession on October 16, 1741 and became a priest. Little news has been passed down about his life and his ministry; in 1759, he was dean of the College of Noyers and then, between 1785 and 1786 and also 1789 to 1792 of the San Carlo.

“ Soppraggiunse then the French Revolution, during which in an endless array of hatred,  Catholics fell victim to the faith for refusing to take the oath sila Costituione civilian clergy, in disregard of the papal authority on the Gallican Church.

“ When the revolutionaries percuisirono the house, nearly all had fled safely, except the upper and Claudio Bochot Eustachio Prosecutor Felix. Both were arrested August 26, 1792, and confined in the Parisian workshop of Saint-Firmin, died a few days after the great massacre of 3 September 1792.

“ Pope Pius XI beatified him October 17, 1926 together with 190 other victims of that persecution during the massacres of September.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Vincenzo Mattia Cabanes Badenas, August 30

August 30, 2009

Blessed Vincenzo Mattia Cabanes Badenas,Priest and Martyr
February 25 1908, in Torrent (Valencia), Spain-September 29, 1936,
Torrent (Valencia), Spain

He is remembered on August 30

Roman Martyrology: In Bilbao also in Spain, blessed Cabanes Badenas Vincent, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of the hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who, during the same persecution against the faith, deserved to be admitted to the eternal banquet.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of Our Spanish Tertiary Capuchin, 19 Spanish members of the Congregation of Our Lady of Sorrows Capuchin Tertiary (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigo y Rerrer, and a sister, also a Capuchin Tertiary, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), a sub-group of the 233 victims of the Spanish Civil War Beatified by Pope John Paul on March 11, 2001 .

“ Badenas Cabanes, Vincenzo, eldest of four siblings, was born February 25 1908, in Torrent (Valencia). He had pronounced his religious vows and completed sludi philosophical and theological, March 12, 1932 he was ordained a priest in Madrid. In the set. “ 1933 was rated top of the reformatory of the Prince of Asturias, in Madrid, and optics. the following year he went on to head the Cabinet of psycho-pedagogy of the reformatory Amurrio (Alava), where he was surprised the civil war broke out July 18, 1936.

On the evening of September 27 the same year, militants arrested him in the house where he had fled. During the ride to Orduna (Vizcaya) demanded that the murderers to deny the German, but he opposed proudly displaying the crucifix. Once in Orduna did get in a ditch near the Prado de San Bartolomé where they shot him with several gunshots. Abandoned and badly wounded, managed to crawl to the first houses in the country, where the family Elejalde Arroyo welcomed him: the priest asked for a doctor and a priest. During the night, still clutching the crucifix, he was transferred to the hospital of Basurto (Bilbao). When asked to explain what had happened, he replied: “Do not ask me these things, I speak only of God Let us pray, the pardon of those who have wounded heart,” and did not reveal the names of those who had sho himt. Died September 29, 1936, after two days of great suffering. His remains rest in the ‘chapel of the martyrs, “the convent of Mount Sion in Torrent (Valencia).

“ The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the archidioccsi of Valencia together with seven other cases relating to as many cases of the martyrdom of members of different religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these causes, May 13 1997 the Positio super martyrdom was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, August 29

August 29, 2009

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Híjar, Spain, March 29, 1912 – August 29, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Híjar always at Teruel in Spain, blessed Francis Monzón Romeo, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who in the same persecution confirmed with blood for his fidelity to the Lord.

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon on March 11, 2001, one of 233 Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Beatified that day by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), August 28

August 28, 2009

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample)

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), Priest and Martyr
February 3, 1896, Viñales (Valencia), Spain-
August 28, 1938, Viñales (Valencia), Spain

Roman Martyrology: Near the village of Viñales still in the same area, blessed Aurelio (Joseph) Ample Alcaide, Order of Friars Minor Capuchin Priest and Martyr, who, during the same period in the battle for the faith brought the glorious prize.

Was born February 3, 1896 in Viñales (Valencia), third of seven children who were spouses D. Ample and Donna Manuela Vicente Alcaide. He was baptized the day after birth, ie February 4, in the parish of San Honorato bishop, and received Confirmation April 21, 1899.

“ He first studied the Seraphic Seminary of Massamagrell (Valencia). Wore the Capuchin habit in 1912, he made his temporary profession of vows on, August 10, 1913 and perpetual December 18, 1917. He was then sent to Rome to perfect himself in his studies and was ordained a priest in the Eternal City March 26, 1921 by the Archbishop of Filipos, Bishop Joseph Palica. Back in Spain, he was appointed director of the student of philosophy and theology of the Capuchins in Orihuela (Alicante), office held, and overall satisfaction with care until death.

“ “Among the faithful he enjoyed the reputation of a saint – said the priest Worker Diocesan D. Pascual Ortells – and that fame also joined the test. Was faithful observant of all the rules of St. Francis, commit itself to helping its total so that young men were perfect. “

“ During the Revolution of 1936 all the religious of the convent of Orihuela dispersed on July 13. P. Aurelio sought refuge in the family home in Viñales, in which, on 28 August, was captured by gunmen and taken to his place of death. Before being killed he urged all his comrades to die well, gave them absolution, and then added, “Cry aloud, live Christ the King.”

“ He was killed August 28, 1936. His body was interred in the cemetery of Foyos (Valencia), near where he had been killed. After the civil war, his remains were exhumed and carried into the cemetery Vinalesa September 17, 1937. He is currently buried in the chapel of the convent of the Capuchin martyrs Maddalena Massamagrell.

“ P. Aurelio retain the use within, since he was captured until death, all remaining faithful to Christ. “He kept the peace until the last moment – he says Rafael Rodrigo, the witness of his martyrdom – encouraging all of us that we were going to die. When everything was ready for execution, urges us to recite the formula of the act of contrition. So we did, and when the Servant of God was reciting the formula of a militiaman gave him two slaps. One of the militiamen said to his companion not to slap him more, because it was not worth the trouble, given the time of life we have left. The Servant of God remained unchanged and continued to injury before the acquittal until the end. As soon as the Servant of God had finished his sacred duty, a volley rang out and we fell with him all repeating the cry: ‘Long live Christ the King!’.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Spanish Capuchins, Martyrs of Valencia, 12 friars and 5 Poor Clares, who suffered martyrdom during the civil war and religious persecution that through their homeland in the 30s of the twentieth century. Pope John Paul II Beatified them on March 11, 2001, together with a group totaling 233 martyrs of the same persecution.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, August 25

August 25, 2009

Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa

Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Zaragoza, Spain, June 3, 1882 – Valencia, Spain, August 25, 1936.

Roman Martyrology: At Valencia in Spain, Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who faced trial for the glorious Christ.

He was Beatified by Pope John Paul on March 11, 2001, together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War as part of the group known as Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

August 19, 2009

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Gerona, Spain, March 21, 1866 – Gandia, Spain, August 19, 1936

Father Tomás Sitjar Forti, professed Priest of the Society of Jesus, was born in the city of Gerona and joined the Society in 1880. He was Rector of the Novitiate and Superior of the Residence of Gandía. He was assassinated in Gandía Bianca Cruz at August 19, 1936 at the age of 70 years.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the city of Gandía in the same territory, Blessed Thomas Sitjar Forti, a priest of the Society of Jesus and Martyr, who scattered in the same persecution for Christ his blood.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya, August 15

August 15, 2009

Blessed Domenico Maria da AlborayaBlessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya (Augustine Hurtado Soler), Priest and Martyr

Alboraya (Valencia) on 28 Aug, 1872-August 15

Ordained a priest on Dec. 19, 1896. An experienced teacher, working and cartatevole, had positions of responsibility in his institute. A man of prayer and great devotee of Our Lady of Sorrows, he celebrated the Eucharist with devotion

Roman Martyrology: Always in Madrid, Blessed Domenico (Augustine) Soler Hurtado, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who had witnessed Christ, received the crown of glory.

Beatified together with a group known as the Blessed Martyrs Third Spanish Capuchins dell’Addolorata, he was one of 19 religious Spaniards belonging to the Congregation of the Third Capuchins of Our Lady of Sorrows (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigó y Rerrer, and a sister, also Tertiary Cappuccina, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39).

The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the Valencia archidiocese together with seven other cases relating to the martyrdom of so many cases of members of various religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these cases, on 13 May. 1997 the Positio super martyria was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Mauritius Tornay, August 11

August 11, 2009

Blessed Maurizio Tornay

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, Priest and Martyr

Rosière, Switzerland, August 31, 1910 – To Thong, Tibet, August 11, 1949

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, professed priest of the Order of Canons Regular of St. Augustine of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bemardo “Montis Iovis”, was born in Rosière (Joint Orsières – canton of Valais), Switzerland, August 31, 1910 and died a martyr at To Thong, Tibet, on August 11, 1949. His tomb is located at the Mission Yerkalo, Tibet-China. He was beatified in Rome by Pope John Paul II on May 16, 1993.

Roman Martyrology: In the region of Tibet, Blessed Mauritius Tornay, Priest and Martyr who, canon regular of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bernard of Mont Joux-announced engagement with the Gospel in China and Tibet and was killed by the enemies of Christ. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed German of Carcaixent, August 9

August 9, 2009

Blessed German of Cartaxeint

Blessed German of Carcaixent (José Maria Hernandez Garrigues) Capuchin Priest and Martyr
Carcaixent, Valencia, Spain, February 12, 1895 – 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Carcaixent in Valencia in Spain, Blessed Germanus ( José Maria) Garrigues Hernández, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who, during persecution against the faith, won the tortures of body with precious death.

Father was born in Germán Carcagente (Valencia), in the bosom of a Christian family, February 12, 1895. He was baptized on his day of birth in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Carcagente Confirmation was received on July 22, 1912 by Bishop Athanasius Fr. Royo Soler, duly authorized by the archbishop of the diocese. In the family of D. Juan Bautista and Donna Garrigues Ana María Hernández were born eight children, three of whom became like our Capuchin, José Maria. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, August 3

August 3, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis SeguiBlessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr,Third Spanish Capuchins
August 3

Roman Martyrology: At Alicante in Spain, followed blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr, who spilled the blood of Christ during the persecution against the faith and obtained the palm of victory.

Pope John Paul II Beatified him on March 11, 2001 in St. Peter’s Square, together wtih 232 other victims of the bloody Spanish Civil War. This wide range of martyrs is divided into several subgroups according to the diocese or congregation to which they belong. The Romanum Martyrologium commemorates those blessed individually or in small groups based on the date and place of where the slaughter occurred.

Blessed Salvatore is part of the subgroup José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, August 2

August 2, 2009

Blessed Francis Tomas Serer

Blessed Francesco Tomas Serer Priest and Martyr

Alicante, Spain, Oct. 11, 1911-August 2, 1936

He professed his temporary vows on September, 15, 1928 and his perpetual vows on December 21. 1933. He was Ordained a priest on May 24, 1934, spent his 2 years of ministry in the reformatory of Amurri (Alava) and Carabanchel Bajo (Madrid). He was persecuted and martyred at 24.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II on December 18, 2000, together with 17 others of his order and a layman.

Roman Martyrology: In Madrid always in Spain, Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, a Priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, in the same persecution that deserved to pay the blood of Christ.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed José Castell Camps, July 28

July 28, 2009

Blessed Jose Castell Camps

José Castell Camps, Salesian Priest and Martyr
Ciudadela, Minorca Island, Spain, October 12, 1902 – Barcelona, Spain, July 28, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, José Castell Camps, priest of the Salesian Society and martyr, through persecution earned his martyrdom with the glory of eternal life.

He was born in Ciudadela (Menorca) October 12, 1902, where he met the Salesians. He went with Campello (Alicante) and Carabanchel (Madrid) for his Salesian studies. His Religious profession was in 1918, his Ordination in 1927. In 1933 he was destined to the house of Tibidabo. In July of 1936, he saw them burn the temple, from a forest nearby, and went to Barcelona to seek refuge. On July 28 he was caught by a patrol of militiamen, questioned in front of another Salesian, and finally killed in the Stessanotte in a prison in Barcelona.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II, on March 11, 2001, together with 232 other Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia, Spain, whose collective Feastday is on September 22.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, July 27

July 27, 2009

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, Priest and Martyr

La Serna, Spain, February 24, 1912 – Llisa of Amunt, Spain, July 27, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Llisa, at Barcelona in Spain, Bl Modesto Vegas Vegas, priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual and Martyr, who in the persecution against the faith spilled his blood for Christ. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas, July 24

July 24, 2009

Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas

Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas Salesian Priest and Martyr
July 24
San Pol de Mar, Spain, September 4, 1914 – Barcelona, Spain, July 23, 1936

Roman Martyrology: Still in Barcelona, Blessed Xavier Bordas Piferrer, religious of the Salesian Society and Martyr who, with his martyrdom witnessed the example of Christ’s life master.

He was born in San Poi de Mar (Barcelona) on September 24, 1914 to a deeply Christian family. His childhood was spent in a very Salesian lifestyle. For six years he studied at the College of Mataro. He took his Religious vows in 1932 and was sent to Rome to study philosophy at the Gregorian University. Together with Don Félix Vivet he went to Spain on holiday on July 17, 1936. In Sarria (Barcelona)he was surprised by the outbreak of civil war. On July 23, he tried to take refuge at a property his parents owned, but was recognized by some people; finding his passport and the identity card of a religious, he was shot on the spot.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, as one of the 201 Blessed Martyrs of Valencia, 42 of which were Spanish Salesians.

Source: Www.sdb.org


Blessed Jean Mopinot, May 21

May 21, 2009

Blessed Jean Mopinot May 21

Blessed Jean Mopinot, Religious and Martyr
Rheims, France, September 12, 1724 – Rochefort, France, May 21, 1794

Jean Mopinot was born in Rheims, France, September 12, 1724 and entered the novitiate Lasallian (the Brothers of Christian Schools) on January 14, 1794. Imprisoned during the French Revolution on particular calls pontoon boats, he died from hardship and disease on May 21, 1794 off the coast of Rochefort, the first of a group of brothers who were also prisoners. John Paul II beatified him on October 1, 1995 together with 63 other martyrs who died during the Revolution: the victims suffered for their faith, known as the “Martyrs of the pontoons of Rochefort.” They were saved from the abuse that 285 people were freed on February 12, 1795; they returned to their countries, leaving written records of the heroic example of their companions, thus starting the process of beatification. There were seven Brothers of Christian Schools imprisoned on pontoons. Three were saved, while the remaining four (including Jean) died in prison.

Roman Martyrology: In front of Rochefort on the French coast, blessed John Mopinot, brother of the Christian Schools and martyr who, during the French Revolution, was held, as religious, in a sordid prison, where he died of illness.

The Brothers of Christian Schools imprisoned in pontoons were actually seven in total: Roger, Leon, Uldaric, Pierre-Christophe, Donat-Joseph, et Jugon Avertin. The latter three were in fact among the survivors and released February 12 1795. Among the four deaths in prison, however, news about Brother Pierre-Christophe was not passed on and he consequently has not been beatified.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati