The Anglican Ordinariate and Celibacy

November 9, 2009

In the 60’s and 70’s, the beginning of the Radical Dissident Catholic Era, many priests were laicized and got married. In fact, many of them married former nuns. While I have only personally been acquainted (that I know of) with one laicized priest, he wasn’t someone who should’ve been ordained. He had the same sort of wardrobe malfunction that Ted Kennedy had. I believe it was intended as a way out. In his case it was successful.

Now that the personal ordinariate for Anglicans has been announced, The Washington Post thinks that celibacy for Roman Catholic Priests is on its way out. What impressed me about the article is that they do point out that Eastern Catholics ordain married men but that priests aren’t married; most people assume that priests may marry after ordination. Eastern Catholic Churches in the US typically ordain only celibate men. Eastern Catholic Bishops are always celibate as are Orthodox Bishops.

I disagree with the Washington Post; Anglicans have made many changes since the church of England was formed, including allowing priests to be married before or after ordination. Eastern Catholics, formerly Orthodox, were brought into Communion with Rome while retaining their traditions, traditions that had existed at the time of the Great Schism, including the Ordination of married men. The difference here is that a married priesthood in the Latin Rite Catholic Church did not exist at the time the Anglicans left and while married men in the Eastern Catholic Churches and the Orthodox Church may be Ordained, priests may not marry after ordination. While it’s certainly possible that the Church would decide to allow married men to be Ordained within the Anglican Personal Ordinariate, I would be very surprised if she would allow priests to get married or allow a married Priesthood in the Latin Rite.

 


Saint George Preca, July 26

July 26, 2009

St. George Preca

Saint George Preca, Priest
July 26
Valletta, Malta, February 12, 1880 – July 26, 1962

First Maltese Saint

He was born in Malta on February 12, 1880. As a child, according to the custom of the time, he was incorporated into the Carmelite Family through the imposition of the scapular. He was ordained a priest on December 22, 1906. In the early months of 1907 a small group of young people in their twenties gathered around him. Began as the Society of Christian Doctrine, known commonly Museum, initial letters of “Magister, utinam sequatur evangelium universus mundus” ( “Master, that the whole world follow the Gospel ‘), a work dedicated to education and religious education of children and of young people. Preca, as an adult, became a Carmelite Tertiary: July 21, 1918 then enrolled and professed his vows on September 26 the following year. When he professed, he chose the name of Franco. In 1952, as recognition of his tireless devotion to the disclosure of the Madonna del Carmine, he was affiliated with the Carmelite Order. He died July 26, 1962. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II on May 9, 2001 in Malta and finally canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on June 3, 2007 in Rome. Read the rest of this entry »


Proposed Connecticut Legislation Interferes with Roman Catholic Church Operations

March 7, 2009

Fr. Z has a post about this bill. As though it isn’t simply outrageous that the State of Connecticut would interfere with a religious corporation, the bill under consideration, singles out the Roman Catholic Church. The objective is to change the structure of the church, removing all power from the Archbishop for anything but pastoral care and putting it into the hands of the laity.

Furthermore, it would abrogate the rights of the church to keep documents private and provide that anyone may copy any church business records with a few days notice, without defining business records. There is neither a provision about payment for those copies , nor any information about privacy rights.

Government proposes to interfere for no good reason in the operation of one Church. This would inhibit the sovereignty of said religion and would entangle government therewith. It looks like religious discrimination to me.

Not only that, it seems like sour grapes of a pro-gay state, which doesn’t like the teaching of the Catholic Church and will do whatever is harmful.

Whoever wrote this bill may believe that because it targets operations rather than actual religious practice, they’re off the hook for discrimination, but I doubt it.  This bill is targeted to one religion so doesn’t pass the smell test. Where I live, bills must be neutral on their face.


WYD: Benedict Bedazzles at Sydney Harbor

July 20, 2008

Having been to two WYD’s (Toronto and Cologne) I can attest that they are supremely powerful experiences. To have the gospel sifted for its specific message for today’s youth by the greatest spiritual authorities on earth is just impossible to express. It is overwhelming.

But, it can be hard to convey that experience to those who were not there.

However, Benedict’s words in themselves, even without all the experiencial props to heighten the experience, have a power to clear ones thinking and set ones heart aright. He seamlessly weaves together concerns for the environment, sexual exploitation, materialism and secularism all in light of the universal spiritual hunger for the Gospel. Powerful!

Here are some of his words at Sydney Harbor on Thursday:

“…Dear friends, life is not governed by chance; it is not random. Your very existence has been willed by God, blessed and given a purpose (cf. Gen 1:28)! Life is not just a succession of events or experiences, helpful though many of them are. It is a search for the true, the good and the beautiful. It is to this end that we make our choices; it is for this that we exercise our freedom; it is in this – in truth, in goodness, and in beauty – that we find happiness and joy. Do not be fooled by those who see you as just another consumer in a market of undifferentiated possibilities, where choice itself becomes the good, novelty usurps beauty, and subjective experience displaces truth. Read the rest of this entry »


Former Anglican Bishop, Catholic Convert, Jeffrey Steenson on Anglocatholicism

July 17, 2008

Steenson as an Anglican Bishop

Former Anglican Bishop Jeffrey Steenson is widely revered among Anglicans as a man of profound integrity and service in the Lord’s vineyard. Last week he spoke at the Anglican Use Conference. He spoke with his usual clarity and Anglican eloquence. Welcome home, Jeffery.

His full address can be found here.

It all begins with the conviction that the Catholic Church simply is. She is not one option amongst many. People who become alienated from their own churches will sometimes think that the next step is to go down to the marketplace and see what is on offer: which church is going to give me the best deal? Those people seldom find the Catholic Church because they have missed the essential point – the fullness of Christ’s blessings is not distributed across the ecclesial landscape but flows from the one Church.

Read the rest of this entry »