Blessed Nicholas Fattore, December 23

December 23, 2009

Blessed Nicholas Fattore

December 23

Franciscan preacher. A native of Valencia, Spain, he entered the Franciscans in 1537 and subsequently labored as a preacher. It was his custom to scourge himself before delivering each sermon. In the process of his beatification in 1786, St. Paschal Baylon and Blessed Louis Bertrand were summoned to act as witnesses.

Source: Catholic Online

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Blessed Raffaele Chylinski, December 2

December 2, 2009

Blessed Raffaele Chylinski, Franciscan
Poznan, Poland, 1694 – Lagiewniki, Poland, December 2, 1741

Roman Martyrology: In Logiewniki, Poland, Blessed Raffaele (Melchior) Chylinski, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, who, in Krakow, during the plague, visited the patients to help them prepare for a holy and honorable and Christian death.

Thanks to a miracle attributed to his intercession and approved January 22, 1991, he was beatified by Pope John Paul II June on 9, 1991 in Warsaw, during his apostolic visit to Poland.

Chylinski Melchiorre was born in Wysoczko the January 8, 1694 in the district of Poznan in Poland, grew up in healthy environment and pious and completed his studies in the schools of his city, embraced the military life and became lieutenant-Journal, but did not last long, obeying the call of God he felt within himself, at age 21 he went to Krakow and entered the Order of Friars Minor Conventual and April 4, 1715, received the habit of changing the cleric named Raffaele.

After his novitiate he made his solemn profession if vows in December 1717 and was ordained a priest. Was Brother monastery of rare spirituality, he carried out his apostolate in various convents of the Order especially in Krakow and Lagiewniki, surrounded by the fame of sanctity.

He died with the unanimous regret of the members in Lagiewniki December 2, 1741 at 47 years or so.

On 29 August 1772, his cause for beatification was introduced by the Diocese of Warsaw and came under the decree on May 13, 1949.

Author: Antonio Borrelli

source: Santi e Beati

 

 


Blessed Bernardine of Fossa, November 27

November 27, 2009

Saint Bernardine of Fossa, Franciscan Priest

Fossa (L’Aquila), 1421 – L’Aquila, November 27, 1503

Of the Order of Friars Minor, historian and ascetical writer, b. at Fossa, in the Diocese of Aquila, Italy, in 1420; d. at Aquila, 27 November, 1503. Blessed Bernardine belonged to the ancient and noble family of the Amici, and sometimes bears the name of Aquilanus on account of his long residence and death in the town of Aquila. He received his early training at Aquila and thence went to Perugia to study canon and civil law.

On the 12th of March in the year 1445, he received the Seraphic habit from St. James of the Marches who was then preaching a course of Lenten sermons at Perugia. From the time of his entrance into religion, Bernardine never ceased to advance in religious perfection, and the success which crowned his missionary labours throughout Italy, as well as in Dalmatia and Serigonia, bears witness to the eminent sanctity of his life. Bernardine fulfilled the office of provincial of the province of St. Bernardine and of the province of Dalmatia and Bosnia, and would have been chosen Bishop of Aquila had not his humility forbidden him to accept this dignity.

His cult was approved by Leo XII, 26 March, 1828. His feast is kept in the Franciscan Order on the 7th of November. The writings of Blessed Bernardine include several sermons and divers ascetical and historical opuscules; among the latter, the “Chronica Fratrum Minorum Observantiae” deserves special mention. This interesting chronicle was first edited by Leonard Lemmens, O.F.M., from the autograph manuscript, and is prefaced by an interesting life of Blessed Bernardine and a critical estimate of his writings. It may also be mentioned that Bernardine is the author of the first life of his patron, St. Bernardine of Siena.

Source: Catholic Encyclopedia

 


Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, November 26

November 26, 2009

Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, Priest
Porto Maurizio, Imperia, 1676 – Rome, November 26, 1751

It is this saint to whom we owe the credit for having conceived the Via Crucis. Ligure (1676-1751), was the son of a sea captain. Born in Porto Maurizio, Imperia today, he studied in Rome at the Collegio Romano, then entered the retirement of St. Bonaventure, on the Palatine Hill, where he would wear the Franciscan habit. Posted in Corsica by the Pope to restore harmony among the citizens, he was able to obtain, despite the serious divisions among the inhabitants, an unthinkable embrace. The theme of the Cross was at the center of his preaching drew crowds to repentance and Christian piety. Alfonso Maria de Liguori called him “the greatest missionary of our century.”

Roman Martyrology: In Rome in the convent of Saint Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, Priest of the Order of Friars Minor, who, full of love for souls, engaged all his life in preaching, in publishing books of devotion and to visit in over three hundred missions in Rome, Corsica and Northern Italy.

Young Franciscan Leonardo had asked to be a missionary in China. Cardinal Colloredo had replied: “Your China will be Italy.”

And at the end of the seventeenth century, Italy had enough misery and misfortune enough to be considered mission territory.

Leonardo was a student in Rome, when a friend suggested going to hear a sermon. A few steps, they found that a hanged man dangling from the gallows. “This is the sermon,” said the two young men.
A few days later, the son of a sea captain of Porto Maurizio, Liguria, followed by two figures of monks who climbed to the convent of San Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, where he donned the habit of the Franciscans called “the riformella” or “displaced” .

Devoting himself to preaching, perhaps remembering that torture hanging from the gallows, including Leonardo was always in mind the other execution, hanging on the Cross. Therefore, his favorite theme was that of the Via Crucis, typically Franciscan devotion to which he gave the largest spread.

His preaching had something dramatic and tragic, often by torchlight and voluntary torture, which underwent between Leonardo, now placing his hand on the torch lit, now scourging blood.

Immense crowds flocked to hear him and be impressed by his fiery speech, which re-called to repentance and Christian piety. “He is the greatest missionary of our century,”said St. Alphonsus de Liguori. Often, the entire audience, during his sermons, burst into sobs.

He preached throughout Italy, but the region of Tuscany was beaten because of the cold Jansenism, he wanted to fight first of all with the fervor of his heart, then with his themes more effective, namely the Name of Jesus, the Madonna and the Via Crucis.

In a visit to Corsica, the island’s troubled robbers fired their muskets into the air, shouting: “Viva friar Leonardo, long live peace.”

Back in Liguria, was launching a galley, named in his honor, San Leonardo. But he was gravely ill, the sailors said: “The boat is water.”

Consumed by the missionary labors, he was finally recalled to Rome, where, with his impassioned sermons, which also assisted the Pope, he prepared the spiritual climate for the Jubilee of 1750. On that occasion, he planted the Via Crucis at the Colosseum, declaring that place sacred to the martyrs.

Historians have also demonstrated that the Colosseum was never martyred Christians, but the preaching ~ in good faith – of San Leonardo prevented the further destruction of the monument, hitherto regarded as a quarry of good stone.

It was his last effort. He died the following year, and San Bonaventura al Palatino it took the soldiers to hold back the crowd who wanted to see the Holy priest and take away his relics. “We lose a friend on earth – the Pope Lambertini said – but we gain a protector in heaven.”

It was he who suggested the definition of the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception, through consultation letters with all the pastors of the Church.

Source: Parish Archives

Note: The site of the Compagnia di San Leonardo da Porto Maurizio

source: Santi e Beati


Blessed John Duns Scotus, November 8

November 8, 2009

Blessed John Duns ScotBlessed John Duns  Scotus
ca. 1265, Scotland – Cologne, November 8, 1308

Born between December 23, 1265 and March 17, 1266, in Scotland, hence the nickname “Scot.” His birthplace, Duns, bore name of his family. As a child, hw came into contact with the Franciscans, with whome he began studying at thirteen, in the recluse of Haddington, County Berwich. After completing his studies in theology he was devoted to teaching, first at Oxford, then in Paris and Cologne. Here, on behalf of the general of his congregation, he had to deal with the heretical doctrines, but managed to concentrate for a short time the firm. He died a few months after his arrival, on November 8, 1308. John Duns is considered one of the greatest masters of Christian theology and is the precursor of the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. John Paul II Beatified him on March 20, 1993 calling him “the bard of the Incarnate Word and defender of the Immaculate conception of Mary.” His mortal remains are kept in the church of the Friars Minor of Cologne.

Roman Martyrology: In Cologne, in Lorraine, now in Germany, Blessed John Duns Scotus, a priest of the Order of Minors, which, of Scottish descent, master distinguished for subtlety of wit and admirable piety, he taught philosophy and theology in schools in Canterbury, Oxford , Paris and Cologne.

Source: Santi e Beati


St John Wall, August 22

August 22, 2009

Blessed John Jones and John WallJPGSt John Wall, Priest and Martyr


+ Worcester, England, August 22, 1679


Born in England he was ordained a priest at Douai, France and

professed the Rule of the Friars Minor. He exercised his priestly

ministry in England for 22 years until he was captured and

sentenced to death. He ascended the scaffold at Worcester

August 22, 1679.


Roman Martyrology: At Worcester in England ever, St John Wall, a priest of the Order of Friars Minor and martyr, who, after exercising in secret for more than twenty years his ministry as pastor, for his priesthood, died hanging in a snare and gutted with his sword during the reign of Charles II.


Born of good and wealthy family in 1620 perhaps chiral Hall, near

Prestnn in Lancashire, John Wall in 1641 came the English College

at Douai, where he received the sacred ordination in 1645. After a

short mission to England, he returned to Douai to wear the

Franciscan habit in the convent of S. Bonaventure (1651), taking

the religious name of Brother Joachim St. Anna, much appreciate

d for its excellent quality, has the functions of vicar of the convent

and master of novices, and in 1656 he left again for the English

mission, going to establish, built the fictitious name of Francis

Webb, for Harvingion Hall in phonics Worcester, and here he coul

d carry undisturbed for over twenty-two pastoral ministry with

great uiililà of local Catholics.



“ Capture unexpectedly in December 1678, to around

Bromsgravc Rushock Court at the time of presumed papist

conspiracy mounted by the notorious Tiius Oatcs Wall decided

ly refused to take the oath of supremacy, so he was locked up in

prisons in Worcester, where he remained for five months between

immature suffering, borne with great fortitude. On April 25 1679

Atkins was tried by the court and sentenced to death on charges

of high treason, as a priest in the kingdom riemraro order one

abroad and to undertake activities of priests.



“ Nonetheless, he was sent to London to be examined by Oatcs,

Bcdloe, Dugdale and Prance, from which, however, cleared of any

involvement lu the Popish plot, despite being again sentenced to

death for his status as a priest, which was returned in Worcester

for the execution, which took place some time more lard, or 22 ag

. 1679. Shortly before boarding the scaffold VP. wrote a long

speech, in which features of his trial and his conviction and handed

it to a friend why he did it to print, as it was (Lond 1679).



“ The only victim who should suffer martyrdom for the faith in

Worcester, Wall was witnessed in the last days of his existence

from brother William Leveson (brother of martyr well Franciscan

VCN. Lcvcsoi Francis), who died in prison in that city at

thirty-four On the Feb. 1680). The mortal remains of the heroic

confessor of the faith were buried in the cemetery adjoining the

church of S. Oswald of Worcester, while the head was taken to

the Franciscan monastery of Douai, in which the martyr belonged,

where it is still preserved and venerated.



“ Honor of the altars, erected by Pope Pius XI December

15 1929 (ci. AAS, XXII [19,301, p. 18, n. CXXX1I), Blessed Wall is

commemorated on 22 August.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, July 27

July 27, 2009

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, Priest and Martyr

La Serna, Spain, February 24, 1912 – Llisa of Amunt, Spain, July 27, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Llisa, at Barcelona in Spain, Bl Modesto Vegas Vegas, priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual and Martyr, who in the persecution against the faith spilled his blood for Christ. Read the rest of this entry »