Saints Abraham and Coren, December 20

December 20, 2009

Saints Abraham and Coren Confessors
December 20

Abraham and Coren were disciples of the holy bishops Joseph, Isaac, and Leander, Armenian priests who were married and had the cure of souls. When in 450 the king of Persia, the Armenians Iezdegerd II sent a decree ordering the mazdeismo to accept as religion, the clergy and principles of Armenians gathered at the synod of Artashat, responded strongly that they preferred death rather than renounce their Christian faith. At this synod was attended by Abraham and Coren. The following year (451) the king sent his army to impose by force what had been unable to achieve with the threats, but the Armenian people under the leadership of her principles fought bravely, and the clergy to support and encourage the soldiers in tough fight. The war marked a defeat for the Armenians, many of whom gained the palm of martyrdom, while others were taken prisoner. Among the latter were also Abraham and Coren, who together with their teachers Joseph, Isaac, and Leander, were thrown into prison for three years in the city of Nisapur, north-east of Persia.

The bishops were put to death since they were held responsible for the rebellion against the king, while their disciples Abraham and Coren, asked to renounce their faith in favor of the worship of the sun was proposed to be set free. They refused, and so the judge ordered them Tamsapur dragged on the ground and then cut off their ears, then sent them to forced labor in Mesopotamia in the lands of the king. Here they lavished help and console the survivors of the Armenian prisoners of war 451. After seven years of hard work, in 461, Coren died after a sunstroke confessing his faith, while Abraham continued for two years to endure life in exile, until he was released in 463 and was able to return home. Here, however, because the people honored him as a confessor, he retired to devote himself to life in solitude cenobitic. After three years, however, the fame of his angelic life attracted even more attention to the people, which forced him to accept the consecration of bishops. He was, in fact, Bishop of Bznunik for some years and died with a reputation for holiness. The feast of the two holy confessors is celebrated on 20 December.

Author: Paolo Ananian

Source: Santi e Beati


St. John de Matha, December 17

December 17, 2009

St. John de Matha

Faucon (Provence), France ca. 1154-Rome, 1213

Tradition holds that John de Matha was born in Faucon (Provence), France around the year 1154. He completed his graduate studies with honors at the University of Paris where he later taught theology. Ordained to the priesthood he experienced a heavenly vision while celebrating his first Mass. He quickly realized that he had been destined by the Lord to redeem Christian captives.

To attain this objective, he founded the Order of the Most Holy Trinity at Cerfroid, France about 1193. He wrote the Order’s Rule, which was approved by Pope Innocent III in 1198. Professing the Rule with great zeal, he was very active in redeeming Christian captives and performing works of mercy. All his life he sought the glory of the Triune God, whose mystery of love and redemption he set as the foundation and purpose of the Order. He died in Rome in the house of St. Thomas In Formis on the Caelian Hill on December 17, 1213.

Source: Trinitarian Order


Saint Alexander Briant, December 1

December 1, 2009

Saint Alexander Briant, Jesuit Priest and Martyr

Somerset, England, about 1556 – Tyburn, London, December 1, 1581

Roman Martyrology: In London, England, Saint Edmund Campion, Rodolfo Sherwin and Alexander Briant, priests and martyrs under Queen Elizabeth I, celebrated for their ingenuity and strength in faith. Edmund, who from an early age he professed the Catholic faith, admitted into the Society of Jesus in Rome and was ordained priest in Prague, he returned home, where, for their efforts in comforting the souls of the faithful with his words and his writings , was killed, after many torments, at Tyburn. With him suffered the same torments the saints Rudolph and Alexander, the second of which he obtained in prison to be admitted into the Society of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, November 26

November 26, 2009

Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, Priest
Porto Maurizio, Imperia, 1676 – Rome, November 26, 1751

It is this saint to whom we owe the credit for having conceived the Via Crucis. Ligure (1676-1751), was the son of a sea captain. Born in Porto Maurizio, Imperia today, he studied in Rome at the Collegio Romano, then entered the retirement of St. Bonaventure, on the Palatine Hill, where he would wear the Franciscan habit. Posted in Corsica by the Pope to restore harmony among the citizens, he was able to obtain, despite the serious divisions among the inhabitants, an unthinkable embrace. The theme of the Cross was at the center of his preaching drew crowds to repentance and Christian piety. Alfonso Maria de Liguori called him “the greatest missionary of our century.”

Roman Martyrology: In Rome in the convent of Saint Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, Priest of the Order of Friars Minor, who, full of love for souls, engaged all his life in preaching, in publishing books of devotion and to visit in over three hundred missions in Rome, Corsica and Northern Italy.

Young Franciscan Leonardo had asked to be a missionary in China. Cardinal Colloredo had replied: “Your China will be Italy.”

And at the end of the seventeenth century, Italy had enough misery and misfortune enough to be considered mission territory.

Leonardo was a student in Rome, when a friend suggested going to hear a sermon. A few steps, they found that a hanged man dangling from the gallows. “This is the sermon,” said the two young men.
A few days later, the son of a sea captain of Porto Maurizio, Liguria, followed by two figures of monks who climbed to the convent of San Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, where he donned the habit of the Franciscans called “the riformella” or “displaced” .

Devoting himself to preaching, perhaps remembering that torture hanging from the gallows, including Leonardo was always in mind the other execution, hanging on the Cross. Therefore, his favorite theme was that of the Via Crucis, typically Franciscan devotion to which he gave the largest spread.

His preaching had something dramatic and tragic, often by torchlight and voluntary torture, which underwent between Leonardo, now placing his hand on the torch lit, now scourging blood.

Immense crowds flocked to hear him and be impressed by his fiery speech, which re-called to repentance and Christian piety. “He is the greatest missionary of our century,”said St. Alphonsus de Liguori. Often, the entire audience, during his sermons, burst into sobs.

He preached throughout Italy, but the region of Tuscany was beaten because of the cold Jansenism, he wanted to fight first of all with the fervor of his heart, then with his themes more effective, namely the Name of Jesus, the Madonna and the Via Crucis.

In a visit to Corsica, the island’s troubled robbers fired their muskets into the air, shouting: “Viva friar Leonardo, long live peace.”

Back in Liguria, was launching a galley, named in his honor, San Leonardo. But he was gravely ill, the sailors said: “The boat is water.”

Consumed by the missionary labors, he was finally recalled to Rome, where, with his impassioned sermons, which also assisted the Pope, he prepared the spiritual climate for the Jubilee of 1750. On that occasion, he planted the Via Crucis at the Colosseum, declaring that place sacred to the martyrs.

Historians have also demonstrated that the Colosseum was never martyred Christians, but the preaching ~ in good faith – of San Leonardo prevented the further destruction of the monument, hitherto regarded as a quarry of good stone.

It was his last effort. He died the following year, and San Bonaventura al Palatino it took the soldiers to hold back the crowd who wanted to see the Holy priest and take away his relics. “We lose a friend on earth – the Pope Lambertini said – but we gain a protector in heaven.”

It was he who suggested the definition of the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception, through consultation letters with all the pastors of the Church.

Source: Parish Archives

Note: The site of the Compagnia di San Leonardo da Porto Maurizio

source: Santi e Beati


St. Peter Ramirez Esqueda, November 22

November 22, 2009

St. Peter Ramirez Esqueda, Priest and Martyr
San Juan de los Lagos, Mexico, April 29, 1887 – Teocaltitlán, Mexico, November 22, 1927

He was born in Mexico in San Juan de los Lagos, Jalisco (Diocese de San Juan de los Lagos) April 29, 1887. As a priest he devoted himself with special care and passion to the catechesis of children. He founded various centers of study and a school for the catechetical formation. When he was in prison he was beaten so severely that a wound opened on his face. A soldier, after hitting him, said, “Now you will be sorry that you are a priest.” But Father Pedro answered, “No, not even a moment, and I miss just watching the sky.” On November 22, 1927 they pulled him out of jail for justice, children surrounded him and father Esqueda repeated insistently: “Do not neglect to study the catechism, nor any reason to leave out the Christian doctrine.” They three shots were fired. He is remembered along with the Mexican saints and martyrs of the twentieth century.

Roman Martyrology: In the city of Teocaltitlán in Mexico, St. Peter Esqueda Ramírez, Priest and Martyr, who, during the persecution in Mexico was thrown into prison for his priesthood, and finally shot.

The 25 Mexican Martyred Saints (Christopher Magallanes Jara and 24 fellows), by the will of John Paul II, immediately after Canonization, were placed in the Roman Calendar on May 21 as an optional memorial. The Martyrologium Romanum commemorates each Saint and Blessed separately, each on the anniversary of martyrdom.

source: Santi e Beati

 


Saint Giordano Ansalone, November 17

November 17, 2009

Saint Giordano Ansalone, Dominican Priest, Martyr
Santo Stefano Quisquina (Agrigento), 1 November 1598 – Nagasaki (Japan), November 17, 1634

In 1625, he reached Seville on foot, he left for the missions. After a break of about a year in Mexico, across the Pacific in the summer of 1626, he reached the Philippine Islands. First two years costs between the Philippines, Cagayan in northern Luzon, then lived for four years among the Chinese of a colony of the suburb of Binondo, Manila, in the Parish and the Hospital S. Gabriel, built for them. Studied the language, the mentality and customs from the Chinese, showing true forerunner of inculturation and dialogue with non-believers. To do this he also wrote an opera, hopelessly lost, which compiled the main religious beliefs and philosophical ideas of the Chinese, discussing them with the data of faith and Catholic doctrine, for an enlightening comparison. In 1632, the midst of this persecution, he went to Japan, disguised as a merchant, to bring aid and comfort: for a year he was the Vicar Provincial of this mission. Seriously ill on the island of Kyushu, “he implored the Virgin Mary to be cured until they had killed Christ.” He was jailed August 4, 1634 and subjected to unspeakable torture.

source: Santi e Beati


Saints Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne, November 14

November 14, 2009

St. Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne

Saints Nicholas Tavelic, Stephen of Cuneo, Deodato Aribert from Ruticinio and Peter of Narbonne Franciscan Priests, Martyrs
† Jerusalem, November 14, 1391

Roman Martyrology: In Jerusalem, the Holy Nicholas Tavelic, Deodato Aribert, Stephen of Cuneo and Peter of Narbonne, Priests of the Order of Friars Minor and Martyrs who were burned in the fire for preaching boldly in the public square in front of the Saracens, the Christian religion, professing Strongly Christ Son of God
Read the rest of this entry »


San Mamete (Mamet), November 5

November 5, 2009

Heaven

San Mamete (Mamet) Confessor
November 5, Auvergne (France), fourth century

His name appears in the “Life III” by Saint Austremonio, bishop of Clermont and first bishop of Auvergne, Massif Central region of France, probably written by St. Gregory of Tours and it classifies him as a companion evangelizer in Auvergne.

Langres (in French Mamet), had to be a priest and was appointed by Saint Austromoine and evangelize the region of the St-Flour. Even today, a village named after him, St-Mamet-le-Salvetat, in the district of Aurillac.

The relics of St. Mamete have disappeared long ago, there is also the doubt that has ever been preserved, not to mention the loss of the relics of many saints at the time of the French Revolution.

His feast day is November 5 in commemoration of all saints of Auvergne, and 17 August in the diocese of St-Flour.

He is the only saint with this name report published in the “Bibliotheca Sanctorum”, and he is not mentioned by the ‘Roman Martyrology’, which instead celebrates November 1 Saint Austromoine with whom he was a partner in evangelizing the Auvergne in the early fourth century.

Author: Antonio Borrelli

Source: Santi e Beati


Sts. Nicander, Bishop and Hermes, Priest, Martyrs, November 4

November 4, 2009

St. Nicander

Saints Nicander, Bishop and Hermes, Priest, Martyrs
November 4

Roman Martyrology: At Myra in Lycia, in modern Turkey, Holy Martyrs Nicander, Bishop, and Hermes, a Priest.

A passio Metaphrastes not included in Menologion Simeon Logoteta, still unpublished, is the only extant document concerning these martyrs.

According to the news of sinassari Byzantine commemorating Nicander and Hermes, to 4 November, the first was bishop of Myra in Lycia, and the second priest ordained bishop by the Apostle Titus of Crete. There would therefore be in the first century. For their zeal to convert the inhabitants to the Christian faith, they were denounced to the governor of the city Libanius. They had them tie back of the horses broke into a gallop. Thus dragged to the ground, the Saints had all the skin torn wetting the soil with their blood. Later they suspended the easel, striking through a wooden board and they are exposed to fire. Since they were miraculously preserved from the flames, the tyrant ordered to plant their nails in the heart and guts. Still alive, were thrown into a grave and covered with earth. Martyrologies unknown to the medieval West, the two Martyrs were introduced to Licia always to November 4, from C. Baronius in the Roman Martyrology.

Author: Antonio Calisi

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Artold, October 8

October 8, 2009

Artoldus

Saint Artold

October 8, 1206, France

Saint Artold was born in the early twelfth century. The generally
approved year of his birth is 1101. As he died in 1206, this makes him
die very old indeed, at 105! What is certain is that as a young man he
entered the renowned Charterhouse of Portes. Humble, recollected
and pious, he so distinguished himself that he was soon judged worthy
to carry out important pastoral tasks.
So in 1132 he was designated as the founder and first Prior of the
Charterhouse of Arvières, in the diocese of Geneva. In order to accomplish
this mission he chose from the lands of his family a vast solitude of extraordinary roughness, covered with snow for the most part of the year, and until then inhabited only by bears, foxes and other animals. In this remote wilderness area Artold and his companions built some rudimentary wooden constructions and led an extremely austere life for ten years. Then one day, the Bishop of Geneva came to visit them. Very impressed, he found a more suitable site for them and urged well-to-do men of his diocese to contribute to the building of an appropriate monastery.
Artold was a good Prior for years, but then the Bishop of Belley, the diocese in which Portes is located, died. The clergy was unanimous that the Prior of Arvières, although at this time already advanced in age, ought to become the
new Bishop. Terrified at this prospect, Artold fled and hid himself! However, he was found and had to accept. He accomplished all the duties of a Bishop in an exemplary way, but after a few years, in 1190, he managed to obtain his retirement, because of old age, from Pope Clement III.
He returned to Arvières, where he lived for still 16 more years! The best-known of all Carthusian Bishops, Saint Hugh of Lincoln, visited him in 1200. When they came together to converse with the community the former Bishop of Belley asked the Bishop of Lincoln to give the brothers an account of the peace treaty between the kings of England and France, since he knew that Hugh had been present when it was made. The latter replied, half seriously, half joking: “My Lord and Father, although it is legitimate for Bishops to hear and relate such matters, it is not so for monks. It is not right to bring news from outside into the cloister or the cell, and to leave the city in order to discuss secular matters in solitude.” Having said this, Hugh turned
the conversation to a spiritual topic. Artold, in his humility, must have
been edified by the remark and moved by its wisdom.
Artold died October 8, 1206. In his last words he recommended the community to have recourse to the Holy Spirit for light and comfort, to the most Holy Virgin for special protection, and to Saint Bruno as model. “Grow in virtue”, he said to them, “in order that the sanctity of this House may last forever, passing on its good traditions to those who come after you. Love one another that charity may be the bond at all times uniting you to all in Jesus Christ.”

Miracles after his death corroborated his renown for holiness. In 1834 Gregory XVI authorized his feast for the diocese of Belley and in 1857 it was permitted to the Carthusians, who today celebrate him with other Carthusian saints on October 13.

Prayer
All-powerful God, with the help of Saint Artold’s prayers
may we so distinguish ourselves in this life’s laborious
struggle that we may obtain eternal rest.

Source: Carthusians


Saint Piato, October 1

October 1, 2009

St. Piato

San Piato, Tournai, Priest and Martyr
October 1

Roman Martyrology: At Seclin in Gallia Belgica, now in France, St. Piato, revered as a Priest, Evangelist and Martyr of the territory of Tournai.

The Roman Martyrology, 1 Oct., Says that Piato was a priest who, starting in Rome, arrived in Gaul, with Quentin and his companions, to preach the Gospel.

Having been assigned Tournai as a field of his apostolate, there he was martyred during the persecution of Maximin. This news comes from Usuard, which, by its wording, was inspired to passive Piatonis, which we discuss later, and says that Piato was fellow of St. Dionysius. The name of this saint is also found in some supplement to the martyrology Geronimo must add that in 1922 the Roman Martyrology and not including Piatonis Piata Piatonis or that it was the usual spelling.

However, wait until the seventh century. for historical information on the saint in question. In the Life of St. Eligius, Bishop of Noyon-Tournai, his disciple Remembrance (d. 684) – unless it is an interpolation of more recent times – said that he discovered the body of St. Eligius Quentin who had been martyred with nails and, after much effort, also found the body of Piato, in the village of Seclin (North) in the territory of Mélantois. The bishop showed the crowd the long nails that had also been extracted from the body of this martyr, was buried the remains and build a mausoleum.

In the sec. VI develops a tradition, still valid at the end of the century. VIII, that the Belgica II was evangelized by some martyrs: Victorian, Fusco, Quentin and Luciano, Crispin and Piato. At their departure from Rome with St. Dionysius of Paris and his comrades was ordained Priest and sent from this region of Tournai.

We need to come to sec. X to find the first biography of Piatano, but once again the editor has copied the Life of St. Lucian of Beauvais, subject to change. According to this account, Piato, after his sermon in the region of Tournai, was arrested by the prefect Rizio-launch (character created second Delehaye, by law) with Quentin and his justice: a sword to slice off the top of the skull.

We note that this passage makes no mention of execution for nails mentioned in the Life of St. Eligius, but adds that the martyr was buried in Seclin (North), near Lille, and his tomb was built a Basilica.

The law was later expanded, “Piato converted thirty thousand pagans. After the punishment the body of the Martyr saint arose, he took with his own hands on top of his head cut off, went from Tournai, and guided by angels, took the place of decapitation, until Seclin, where he was buried, Piato thus belongs the ranks of the saints cefalofori.

Piato became the patron saint of Tournai and his name is found in the ancient litanies. At the time of the Norman invasion, his relics were transferred to St-Omer (news that is disputed by F. Lot), then to Chartres and then to Tournai. The body was later returned to Seclin, but this is unlikely because at Chartres in sec. XII claimed to possess the whole body on the other hand a survey of the relics carried in Seclin in 1853 noted the existence of only a few bones.

At Chartres the casket of Piato underwent various vicissitudes: the seal in silver and decorated since 1750 was stolen during the Revolution and sent to Paris, while the relics remained in the cathedral. In the district of the city there is also a parish dedicated to this Martyr.

In the crypt beneath the choir of the collegiate church of Seclin and dating at best the SEC. XIII preserves a sarcophagus of the Gallo-Roman city that has been identified with the tomb of Piato.

It was also suggested that the Saints of Chartres and in Tournai owe their existence to a relic of St. Piato, Martyr of Andra.

Author: Rombaut Van Doren

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Simon de Rojas, Spetember 28

September 28, 2009

St. Simon de Rojas

St. Simon de Rojas, Religious Trinitarian, Priest
Valladolid, Spain, October 28, 1552 – September 29, 1624

Father SIMON DE ROJAS of the Trinitarian Order was born at Valladolid, Castilla, Spain, the 28th of October, 1552. At twelve years of age, he entered the Trinitarian monastery of the city where he was born and there made his religious profession on October 28, 1572; he studied at the University of Salamanca from 1573 to 1579; he was ordained a priest in 1577; he taught philosophy and theology at Toledo from 1581 to 1587; from 1588 until his death he fulfilled with much prudence the office of superior in various monasteries of his province and was sent as apostolic visitor twice to his own province of Castilla, and once to that of Andalusia; on April 14, 1612 he founded the Congregation of the Slaves of the Sweet Name of Mary; in 1619 he was named tutor to the royal princes of Spain; on May 12, 1621 he was elected Provincial of Castilla; on January 1, 1622 he was chosen confessor of Queen Isabel of Borbon; he died on September 29, 1624. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Alonso de Orozco, September 19

September 19, 2009

Saint Adalonso de OorozcoSaint Alonso de Orozco, Priest

Oropesa (Toledo), Spain, 17 October 1500-Madrid, Spain, 19 September 1591

Saint Alonso was canonized 19 May 2002 by Pope John Paul II

lessed Alonso de Orozco has a very special place among the mystics of sixteenth Century Spain. Of all of them he was perhaps the most prolific and no doubt the most read of his own day. Some twenty works of his in Spanish went though many editions, and some of them were translated into other languages. There is a large collection of sermons in Latin, culled from his long preaching career.

Alonso was born at Oropesa (Toledo), Spain, on 17 October 1500. He studied at Talavera de la Riena, where his family had relocated in 1508, and then at Toledo. Afterward he studied law at the University of Salamanca and was exposed to the preaching of Saint Thomas of Villanova. Attracted to Augustinian religious life by the words and example of this famous friar, Alonso entered the novitiate at the age of twenty-two, together with his brother Francis, on 8 June 1522. His master was the saintly Louis de Montoya, and his prior was Thomas of Villanova. The death of Francis during the novitiate was a great trial to Alonso, but he persevered and professed vows the following year.

For thirty years Alonso was engaged in the apostolate of teaching and preaching. Four times he was appointed prior of various monasteries and in 1548 obtained permission to fulfill his long felt desire to go to the missions in Mexico. By the time he reached the Canary Islands, however, a severe case of arthritis forces his return home. In the book of his Confessions, Alonso records that in the year 1542, while residing in the monastery of Seville, he beheld in a dream the Mother of God “who spoke to me but one word, and that was ‘Write.'” Ever after Alonso followed this instruction, producing books on a variety of subjects up until his ninetieth year.

In 1551 he was appointed prior in the royal city of Valladolid and shortly thereafter named court preacher and chaplain to the royal family. Ten years later King Philip II transferred his court to Madrid and Blessed Alonso was constrained to accompany him. He occupied a cell in the friary of San Felipe el Real, where his life was one of simplicity and humility in contrast to the official functions of the court in which he necessarily participated. In the midst of his many duties in Madrid he was also responsible for the foundation of three convents of Augustinian contemplative nuns and the College of the Incarnation for the education of candidates to the Order. As he neared his eightieth year Friar Alonso approached the king with the request that he might be relieved of his duties at the court in order to spend his final days in prayer and seclusion in preparation for his death. The response of the King was an unqualified refusal, echoed loudly by the members of the court, who desired that the “saint of the court” should carry on in his ministry to them. As it happened, his services would continue for another ten years.

On 19 September 1591, after an illness of several weeks duration, Alonso died at the age of ninety, mourned by young and old, wealthy and poor, the humble and the great. He was buried in the church of the College of the Incarnation in Madrid. In 1853 his remains were transferred to the community chapel of the Valladolid monastery and later placed in an altar of the new church there. Finally in1978 they were returned to Madrid to rest in the chapel of the contemplative nuns of Talavera de a Riena.

Pope Leo XIII declared Alonso de Orozco blessed 15 January 1882. The Augustinian Family celebrates his memory on 19 September.

Source: Augustinians


Saint John Chrysostom, September 13

September 13, 2009

St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church. Remembered on September 13 on the Latin calendar.

My Saint for this year.


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Gaetano Thiene, August 7

August 7, 2009

Saint Gaetano ThieneSaint Gaetano Thiene, Priest

Vicenza, October 1480 – Naples, August 7, 1547
Born in Vicenza to the noble family of Thiene in 1480, and baptized with the name of Gaetano, in memory of his famous uncle, who was called so because he was born in Gaeta.  Protontario apostolic of Julius II, left Leo X in the papal court maturing, especially nell’Oratorio of Divine Love, the joint experience of prayer and service to the poor and the excluded. And restoration of the priesthood and religious life, inspired by the Sermon on the Mount and the model of the apostolic Church. Devotee of the crib and passion of the lord, he founded (1524) with Gian Pietro Carafa, bishop of Chieti (Teate), then Paul IV (1555-1559), the Clerics Regular Teatini. For his unlimited trust in God is revered as the saint of providence.

Roman Martyrology: Saint Gaetano da Thiene, a priest who dedicated himself to Naples at the foot works of charity, in particular striving for the sick incurable sponsored associations for the religious formation of the laity and the Clerics Regular instituted for the renewal of the Church, calling for His disciples the duty to observe the ancient lifestyle of the Apostles.

Source: Santi e Beati

The Cult of Personality

July 31, 2009

The Cult of Personality has struck again and I’m nervous. Obama is attempting to force through way too much legislation that nobody has read, reviewed or understands. I don’t want to be forced to die when someone decides I’m no longer necessary; on his staff is someone who at one time advocated forced sterilization even though that has already been ruled on by the courts and you can’t do it. Read the rest of this entry »