May 23: Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski

May 23, 2010


Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski, 1869 – 1940


Friday’s Flannery: A Stroke of Good Fortune, by Flannery O’Connor

December 9, 2009

William Blake’s Jacob’s Ladder

Friday’s Flannery is a series of posts on Flannery O’Connor’s short stories.

A Stroke of Good Fortune is a masterful little story.  By no means Flannery’s most popular, it strikes at the heart of post War American aspirations and the spiritual challenges that accompany them.  Ruby Hill is another of Flannery’s tortured souls.  As with most of her sorry characters, Ruby’s miseries are  produced by a bad interaction between her state in life and her refusal to understand and accept it gracefully.  Her ambitions are patently American and modern rather than specifically Southern.  Ruby is caught up in self pity over her daily routine of walking eight blocks each way for groceries and having to carry them up four flights.  In her head spin aspirations of one-storied suburban life, a novelty in 1949.  She pines for the “good life,” desperately seeking to avoid the miseries of her mother who bore eight children and lost several along the way.  She is proud of having mastered her fertility which in her mind is both wise and progressive.

Progress and Sin

Many of Flannery’s stories address the idea of progress and contrast it with eternal verities.  In A View of the Woods, she contrasts the pursuit of money and power represented by progress with the values of family and the beauty of nature.  Some of her characters dismiss Catholicism as medieval and backward.  Flannery almost always presents the modern and the progressive as instances of certain deadly sins including Greed, Jealousy, Gluttony and Pride.   In A Stroke of Good Fortune, we Read the rest of this entry »


Indulgences for The Year for Priests, First Thursdays

November 4, 2009

angels adoring eucharist

Indulgences are available for The Year for Priests on the First Thursday of each month.


Proponents of Women’s Ordination just don’t get it!

September 3, 2009

Mantilla-twitch to Fr. Z who posted a request to weigh in on a survey about womens’ ordination. If the poll is still open, please vote no.

The Archbishop of Cincinnati has banned a nun from teaching in the Archdiocese.

Why?

She supports Women’s Ordination.

Problem?

Yes, indeed! Catholics are supposed to be Catholic. In addition to weekly Sunday Mass and regular Confession, Catholics are meant to adhere to church teaching.

That means all of it.

While there are a few things that I have some difficulty with, which is probably true with everyone, it’s one thing to have thoughts in my head. It’s another for others to know what they are. I’m not in a position to speak for, or to appear to be speaking for the Church; however, I don’t discuss those things with which I struggle. If I did? Pastor, Spiritual Director and Confessor are those with whom I may discuss these things. They’re not for public consumption.

If I worked for the church or volunteered with religious education, it would be a problem for me to allow my difficult areas to be known; public dissent would be inappropriate.

How much more inappropriate, then, is it for a professed religious to speak publicly against church teaching? A nun or religious sister has professed vows, usually including obedience; in addition to obeying church teaching, she must obey her superiors in her order. In turn, her order must obey the Bishop in whose territory it operates. That means that public dissent from church teaching is forbidden. If she is told to publicly recant, she must do so.

The nun in this story refuses. While she’s willing to remove her name from a webpage advocating for Women’s Ordination, she refuses Archbishop Pilarczyk’s requirement that she publicly recant. He, with good reason and with authority, properly bans her from teaching in his Archdiocese.

Her supporters bring up her 40 years of teaching, which is material only inasmuch as she has had 40 years to spread her dissent within the church. It’s no wonder that people are confused. The fact that she has taught for 40 years in no way relates to the fact that she is publicly advocating for something that is outside of church teaching. The Church is not a Democracy!

She says it’s about equality. It isn’t. It’s about wanting what you can’t have. If she thinks women’s ordination is that important, she should leave her order and join a church that ordains women.

The Church is true to Christ. Why settle for anything less?


Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, August 29

August 29, 2009

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Híjar, Spain, March 29, 1912 – August 29, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Híjar always at Teruel in Spain, blessed Francis Monzón Romeo, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who in the same persecution confirmed with blood for his fidelity to the Lord.

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon on March 11, 2001, one of 233 Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Beatified that day by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), August 28

August 28, 2009

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample)

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), Priest and Martyr
February 3, 1896, Viñales (Valencia), Spain-
August 28, 1938, Viñales (Valencia), Spain

Roman Martyrology: Near the village of Viñales still in the same area, blessed Aurelio (Joseph) Ample Alcaide, Order of Friars Minor Capuchin Priest and Martyr, who, during the same period in the battle for the faith brought the glorious prize.

Was born February 3, 1896 in Viñales (Valencia), third of seven children who were spouses D. Ample and Donna Manuela Vicente Alcaide. He was baptized the day after birth, ie February 4, in the parish of San Honorato bishop, and received Confirmation April 21, 1899.

“ He first studied the Seraphic Seminary of Massamagrell (Valencia). Wore the Capuchin habit in 1912, he made his temporary profession of vows on, August 10, 1913 and perpetual December 18, 1917. He was then sent to Rome to perfect himself in his studies and was ordained a priest in the Eternal City March 26, 1921 by the Archbishop of Filipos, Bishop Joseph Palica. Back in Spain, he was appointed director of the student of philosophy and theology of the Capuchins in Orihuela (Alicante), office held, and overall satisfaction with care until death.

“ “Among the faithful he enjoyed the reputation of a saint – said the priest Worker Diocesan D. Pascual Ortells – and that fame also joined the test. Was faithful observant of all the rules of St. Francis, commit itself to helping its total so that young men were perfect. “

“ During the Revolution of 1936 all the religious of the convent of Orihuela dispersed on July 13. P. Aurelio sought refuge in the family home in Viñales, in which, on 28 August, was captured by gunmen and taken to his place of death. Before being killed he urged all his comrades to die well, gave them absolution, and then added, “Cry aloud, live Christ the King.”

“ He was killed August 28, 1936. His body was interred in the cemetery of Foyos (Valencia), near where he had been killed. After the civil war, his remains were exhumed and carried into the cemetery Vinalesa September 17, 1937. He is currently buried in the chapel of the convent of the Capuchin martyrs Maddalena Massamagrell.

“ P. Aurelio retain the use within, since he was captured until death, all remaining faithful to Christ. “He kept the peace until the last moment – he says Rafael Rodrigo, the witness of his martyrdom – encouraging all of us that we were going to die. When everything was ready for execution, urges us to recite the formula of the act of contrition. So we did, and when the Servant of God was reciting the formula of a militiaman gave him two slaps. One of the militiamen said to his companion not to slap him more, because it was not worth the trouble, given the time of life we have left. The Servant of God remained unchanged and continued to injury before the acquittal until the end. As soon as the Servant of God had finished his sacred duty, a volley rang out and we fell with him all repeating the cry: ‘Long live Christ the King!’.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Spanish Capuchins, Martyrs of Valencia, 12 friars and 5 Poor Clares, who suffered martyrdom during the civil war and religious persecution that through their homeland in the 30s of the twentieth century. Pope John Paul II Beatified them on March 11, 2001, together with a group totaling 233 martyrs of the same persecution.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, August 27

August 27, 2009

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, Priest and Martyr
August 27

Roman Martyrology: Along the road between the towns of Godella Bétera and in the same region in Spain, blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, priest and martyr who shed their blood for Christ during the same persecution against the faith.On March 11, 2001, Pope John Paul II Beatified in St. Peter’s Square in Rome 233 Spanish martyrs, including the thickest cloud of witnesses of faith elevated to the glory of the altars in the course of his pontificate.

“ These numerous innocent lambs of the cause of Christ were killed out of hatred for their faith during the brutal religious persecution that characterized the Spanish Civil War in the 30s of the twentieth century. In this bloody massacre that through Spain, the number of victims over a million, affecting people of all ages and social class: bishops, priests, religious and laity of both sexes. It was well established by historians that, within this terrible massacre, anarchists and socialists-communists perpetrated a real persecution aimed at destroying the Catholic Church in Spain.

The martyrs were divided into smaller groups, based on their Archdiocese. Blessed Raimondo is part of the group known as José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia who were Decreed on Martyrs on December 18, 2000

Source:  Santi e Beati


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski, August 20

August 20, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski, Priest and Martyr
Ociaz, Poland, June 24, 1911 – Dachau, Germany, August 20, 1942

Wladyslaw Maczkowski, priest of the Archdiocese of Gniezno, fell victim of the Nazis in the famous German concentration camp at Dachau. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar together with 107 other victims of that persecution.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria in Germany, Blessed Ladislaus Mączkowski, priest and martyr, who, of Polish origin, was deported during the war and to the persecutors of human dignity and defense of Christianity among the torture his faith until death.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Mirone of Cizici, August 17

August 17, 2009

Saint Mirone of Cizici, Priest and Martyr
August 17
m. Cizici, 250

Saint Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who according to legend was beheaded after many torments at Cizici nell’Ellesponto under the governor Antipatro and the reigning emperor Decius.

Roman Martyrology: At Cizici in Ellesponto, in modern Turkey, St. Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who, as we passed, was beheaded after many torments under the Emperor Decius and the governor Antipatro.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya, August 15

August 15, 2009

Blessed Domenico Maria da AlborayaBlessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya (Augustine Hurtado Soler), Priest and Martyr

Alboraya (Valencia) on 28 Aug, 1872-August 15

Ordained a priest on Dec. 19, 1896. An experienced teacher, working and cartatevole, had positions of responsibility in his institute. A man of prayer and great devotee of Our Lady of Sorrows, he celebrated the Eucharist with devotion

Roman Martyrology: Always in Madrid, Blessed Domenico (Augustine) Soler Hurtado, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who had witnessed Christ, received the crown of glory.

Beatified together with a group known as the Blessed Martyrs Third Spanish Capuchins dell’Addolorata, he was one of 19 religious Spaniards belonging to the Congregation of the Third Capuchins of Our Lady of Sorrows (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigó y Rerrer, and a sister, also Tertiary Cappuccina, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39).

The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the Valencia archidiocese together with seven other cases relating to the martyrdom of so many cases of members of various religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these cases, on 13 May. 1997 the Positio super martyria was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Albocacer da Modesto, August 13

August 13, 2009

Blessed Modesto da Albacar

Blessed Albocacer Modesto (Modesto Garcia Marti),Priest and Martyr
Modesto, Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880 – Valencia, August 13, 1936

Roman Martyrology: At the village of Albocàsser in the same region in Spain, Bl Modesto García Martí, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who during the persecution against the faith with martyrdom crowned the evangelical precept.

Fr Albocácer was born in Modesto, the diocese of Tortosa and the province of Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880. He was the third of seven children of a Christian family, whose parents were D. Francisco Garcia and Donna Joaquina Martí. He was baptized on January 19, 1880 in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Albocácer. As a child he entered the Seraphic Seminary of the Capuchins of the Province of Valencia in Massamagrell. He took the habit in the same convent on January 1, 1896; took his temporary vows January 3 1897 and perpetual vows on January 6, 1900. He completed his studies in philosophy and those of Orihuela to Massamagrell theology, and was ordained a priest on December 19, 1903. He lived most of his apostolic ministry as a missionary in Colombia in the Custody of Bogota. On his return to Valencia was appointed guardian for several years.

Those who knew him speak of him as a priest dedicated to apostolic preaching, spiritual exercises, spiritual direction, … which were, among others, his favorite activities. So said those who lived with him: “His field of apostolate favorite – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was preaching, spiritual exercises and the direction of souls. I heard criticism ever in its work “. He enjoyed a reputation for holiness among the faithful. “His was a peaceful temperament. His most remarkable quality – notes Mr. Daniel Garcia – was kindness. He enjoyed good a reputation among his companions of religion and among the faithful. He was loyal observant of the Franciscan Rules and Constitutions.”

At the time of the Revolution was the guardian of national Olleria (Valencia), where “the community was violently destroyed, the convent and the church destroyed by fire, the pine wood cut from the same monastery, destroyed the walls, so that everything was reduced nothing “. When communications were restored, P. Modesto went to his country and took refuge in the house of his sister Teresa, along with his brother Miguel Mosen priest, pastor of Torrembesora. For her safety he fled the farm la Masa, where he was captured by armed militiamen. P. Modesto was delivered with gentleness and humility – said Mr. Arturo Adell – and without any protest. His attitude during this period – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was the total abandonment to the Lord and an exemplary life.” He was killed at four in the afternoon of August 13, near the basin of the Valley Albocácer between the farm and the Masa, about 600 meters from the farmhouse, on the same road that goes from the farm to the country. After the release of Albocácer exhumations were the remains of P. Modest and then found that his skull had been crossed from side to side by a large nail. His remains – according to Mr. Felipe Mateu were buried in a mass grave of the cemetery in the country and are currently resting in a niche of the cemetery.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 as one of 17 Blessed Spanish Capuchins of Valencia.

Source: Holy See


LA Priest helps parishioners stay out of foreclosure

August 10, 2009

Another non-traditional pastoral duty. My pastor once mentioned that going through seminary, he thought all he’d have to deal with was religious issues and was surprised to find that he must sometimes be involved in other sorts of issues, such as paying attention to political matters, when infrastructure changes may affect his building.

~~~

Saving souls and homes: LA Priest labors to keep his flock out of foreclosure

By CHRISTINA HOAG , Associated Press

Last update: August 5, 2009 – 11:07 AM

LOS ANGELES – A priest’s typical mission is saving souls, but the Rev. John Lasseigne has a more down-to-earth goal — saving homes.

That’s like trying to work a miracle in Lasseigne’s Roman Catholic parish of Pacoima, a blue-collar corner of the San Fernando Valley where bank sale signs sprout faster than weeds. One in nine homes is in default, making it one of the nation’s hardest hit towns in the foreclosure crisis.

“We’re talking thousands of foreclosures,” said the 44-year-old priest at Mary Immaculate Church. “I was stunned.” Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Edward Gryzmala, August 10

August 10, 2009

Blessed Edward Gryzmala

Blessed Edward (Edward) Grzymala, Priest and Martyr


Kolodziaz, Poland, September 29, 1906 – Dachau, Germany, August 10,

1940

Blessed Edward Grzymala, a diocesan priest, was born in Kolodziaz, Poland, September 29, 1906 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 10, 1940. He wasbeatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) on June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria inGermany, Drzewiecki blessed Francis of the Congregation of the Little Work of Divine Providence, and Edoardo Grzymała, priests and martyrs, who, ofPolish origin, during the devastation of their homeland in time of war were made by their persecutors in a foreign prison and reached Christ killed in a gas chamber.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed German of Carcaixent, August 9

August 9, 2009

Blessed German of Cartaxeint

Blessed German of Carcaixent (José Maria Hernandez Garrigues) Capuchin Priest and Martyr
Carcaixent, Valencia, Spain, February 12, 1895 – 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Carcaixent in Valencia in Spain, Blessed Germanus ( José Maria) Garrigues Hernández, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who, during persecution against the faith, won the tortures of body with precious death.

Father was born in Germán Carcagente (Valencia), in the bosom of a Christian family, February 12, 1895. He was baptized on his day of birth in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Carcagente Confirmation was received on July 22, 1912 by Bishop Athanasius Fr. Royo Soler, duly authorized by the archbishop of the diocese. In the family of D. Juan Bautista and Donna Garrigues Ana María Hernández were born eight children, three of whom became like our Capuchin, José Maria. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, August 8

August 8, 2009

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, Priest and Martyr
Rogoznica, Poland, January 30, 1886 – Gusen, Austria, August 8, 1940

Wlodzimierz Laskowski, a priest of the Archdiocese of Poznan, fell victim of the Nazis in their hatred of the Christian faith. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution. While they were beatified together, their deaths took place separately so there is not a collective memorial.

Roman Martyrology: At Gusen Germany blessed Vladimiro Laskowski, priest and martyr, who, in times of war, was deported for his faith in this prison camp and, cruelly tortured, reached the glory of martyrdom.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Gaetano Thiene, August 7

August 7, 2009

Saint Gaetano ThieneSaint Gaetano Thiene, Priest

Vicenza, October 1480 – Naples, August 7, 1547
Born in Vicenza to the noble family of Thiene in 1480, and baptized with the name of Gaetano, in memory of his famous uncle, who was called so because he was born in Gaeta.  Protontario apostolic of Julius II, left Leo X in the papal court maturing, especially nell’Oratorio of Divine Love, the joint experience of prayer and service to the poor and the excluded. And restoration of the priesthood and religious life, inspired by the Sermon on the Mount and the model of the apostolic Church. Devotee of the crib and passion of the lord, he founded (1524) with Gian Pietro Carafa, bishop of Chieti (Teate), then Paul IV (1555-1559), the Clerics Regular Teatini. For his unlimited trust in God is revered as the saint of providence.

Roman Martyrology: Saint Gaetano da Thiene, a priest who dedicated himself to Naples at the foot works of charity, in particular striving for the sick incurable sponsored associations for the religious formation of the laity and the Clerics Regular instituted for the renewal of the Church, calling for His disciples the duty to observe the ancient lifestyle of the Apostles.

Source: Santi e Beati

How Long do Catholics keep a Pope?

August 7, 2009

Pope john paul IIPope John Paul II

Today I talked to someone who commented on how much he had liked Pope John Paul II but wondered why we had him so long. When I said he was one of the longest reigning Popes ever, the guy said he thought the Pope was elected every four years, just like the President of the US.

I informed him that we keep the Pope until he dies, like the Supreme Court Justices but didn’t think to mention that he lives in our hearts forever.

And chose not to mention that in some cases, we keep them longer.

PopeGregoryVIITombPope St. Gregory VII


Blessed Matteo da Bascio, August 6

August 6, 2009

Blessed Matteo da Bascia

Blessed Matteo da Bascio, founder of the Capuchins
Pennabilli, Pesaro-Urbino, circa 1495 – Venezia, August 6, 1552

Born in the village of Bascio, today in the town of Pennabilli (PU), he became a Franciscan of the Observant branch of the convent of Montefiorentino at Frontino (PU) and was ordained a priest in 1525. Desiring to return to the primitive rigor of Franciscan life, in 1525 he left his monastery and was granted by Pope Clement VII the personal privilege of dressing in a long tunic of rough cloth (such as Francis of Assisi, but with a longer hood and sharp) to observe strictly the rule of absolute poverty, to make a hermitic life and to preach freely. His example gave rise to a number of imitators who began restoring the original spirit of the Franciscan way home and had the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, which thanks to the support of Katherine duchess of Camerino Cybo was approved by the pope on July 3, 1528 with the Bull religionis zelus. In the first general chapter of the order, held in April 1529 in the church of Santa Maria di dell’Acquarella Albacina at Fabriano, Matthew was elected first superior general. Bright omileta, he took part in the great reform movement of the religious life of the sixteenth century. He died in Venice, in the church of San Moisè and buried in the church of San Francesco della Vigna.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. Cassian, August 5

August 5, 2009

st. cassian

St. Cassian, Bishop

Roman Martyrology: At lugdunense Autun in Gaul, now France, St. Cassian, Bishop.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. John Mary Vianney, August 4, the 150th Anniversary of his Passing

August 4, 2009

Saint John VianneySt John Vianney

Dardilly, near Lyons, France, May 8, 1786-Ars, 4 August, 1859

Please note that today is one of the days in which the faithful may potentially earn a plenary indulgence .

In 1806, the curé at Ecully, M. Balley, opened a school for ecclesiastical students, and Jean-Marie was sent to him. Though he was of average intelligence and his masters never seem to have doubted his vocation, his knowledge was extremely limited, being confined to a little arithmetic, history, and geography, and he found learning, especially the study of Latin, excessively difficult. One of his fellow-students, Matthias Loras, afterwards first Bishop of Dubuque, assisted him with his Latin lessons. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Alex Sobaszek, August 1

August 1, 2009

Blessed Alex Sobacsek

Blessed Alessio Sobaszek Priest and Martyr
Przygodzice Wielkie, Poland, July 17 ,1895 – Dachau, Germany, August 1, 1942

Diocesan priest. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw, Poland on June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria in Germany, Blessed Alessio Sobaszek, priest and martyr, who, of Polish birth, in time of war brutally deported by the invaders, dying for Christ under torture, defending his faith.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, July 31

July 31, 2009

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, Priest and Martyr
Izdebno, Poland, September 28, 1900 – Dachau, Germany, July 31, 1942

Michal Ozieblowski, priest of the Archdiocese of Warsaw, fell victim of the Nazis in the famous German concentration camp at Dachau. Pope John Paul II on June 13, 1999 raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution.

Roman Martyrology: Near Monaco of Bavaria in Germany in the prison camp at Dachau, Blessed Michael Oziębłowski, Priest and Martyr, who, deported to his faith in a foreign prison in Poland, his homeland, forced under an enemy of religion, brought to completion martyred under torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, July 30

July 30, 2009

Blessed Pazo Cid Sergio

Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, Salesian Priest and Martyr
Allariz, Spain, April 24, 1884 – Barcelona, Spain, July 30, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, Spain, Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, a Priest of the Salesian Society and Martyr, who, during a time of persecution, died for his courageous witness of faith.

Born in Allariz (Orense) April 24, 1884. From the time he was small, he intuited his vocation. He did his seminary studies at Sarria (Barcelona), professing his vows in 1905. His was an exemplary life. All spoke of him with great respect and almost reverence for the goodness in everything he did. A tireless worker, he spent almost his entire life as a pastoral charge of Sarria. He was forced to leave his college in Sama July 22, 1936, sought refuge and was recognized and denounced. Stopped, he did not deny his condition: “Yes, I am a Salesian priest.” He was shot on July 30.

Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 other Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia.

Source: Salesians


Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, July 29

July 29, 2009

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, Priest and Martyr
Huesca, November 23, 1872 – Valencia, July 29, 1936

Professed priest of the Salesian Society of Saint John Bosco, born in Azanuy (Huesca), Spain, November 23, 1872, died at the Bridge of St. Josephon the road to Valencia, Spain, July 29, 1936. He is buried at the cemetery Benimaclet in Valencia. Pope John Paul II beatified him on March 11, 2001 together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War from the Diocese of Valencia. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed José Castell Camps, July 28

July 28, 2009

Blessed Jose Castell Camps

José Castell Camps, Salesian Priest and Martyr
Ciudadela, Minorca Island, Spain, October 12, 1902 – Barcelona, Spain, July 28, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, José Castell Camps, priest of the Salesian Society and martyr, through persecution earned his martyrdom with the glory of eternal life.

He was born in Ciudadela (Menorca) October 12, 1902, where he met the Salesians. He went with Campello (Alicante) and Carabanchel (Madrid) for his Salesian studies. His Religious profession was in 1918, his Ordination in 1927. In 1933 he was destined to the house of Tibidabo. In July of 1936, he saw them burn the temple, from a forest nearby, and went to Barcelona to seek refuge. On July 28 he was caught by a patrol of militiamen, questioned in front of another Salesian, and finally killed in the Stessanotte in a prison in Barcelona.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II, on March 11, 2001, together with 232 other Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia, Spain, whose collective Feastday is on September 22.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, July 27

July 27, 2009

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas

Blessed Modesto Vegas Vegas, Priest and Martyr

La Serna, Spain, February 24, 1912 – Llisa of Amunt, Spain, July 27, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Llisa, at Barcelona in Spain, Bl Modesto Vegas Vegas, priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual and Martyr, who in the persecution against the faith spilled his blood for Christ. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint George Preca, July 26

July 26, 2009

St. George Preca

Saint George Preca, Priest
July 26
Valletta, Malta, February 12, 1880 – July 26, 1962

First Maltese Saint

He was born in Malta on February 12, 1880. As a child, according to the custom of the time, he was incorporated into the Carmelite Family through the imposition of the scapular. He was ordained a priest on December 22, 1906. In the early months of 1907 a small group of young people in their twenties gathered around him. Began as the Society of Christian Doctrine, known commonly Museum, initial letters of “Magister, utinam sequatur evangelium universus mundus” ( “Master, that the whole world follow the Gospel ‘), a work dedicated to education and religious education of children and of young people. Preca, as an adult, became a Carmelite Tertiary: July 21, 1918 then enrolled and professed his vows on September 26 the following year. When he professed, he chose the name of Franco. In 1952, as recognition of his tireless devotion to the disclosure of the Madonna del Carmine, he was affiliated with the Carmelite Order. He died July 26, 1962. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II on May 9, 2001 in Malta and finally canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on June 3, 2007 in Rome. Read the rest of this entry »


Long-lost Mosaic Seraphim Uncovered at Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia

July 25, 2009

Note: Below image is the Archangel Gabriel, not one of the newly uncovered images.

GabrielOfficial: Long-lost mosaic seraphim uncovered at Istanbul’s Haghia Sophia

SUZAN FRASER, Star Tribune

ANKARA, Turkey – Restoration workers have uncovered a well-preserved, long-hidden mosaic face of an angel at the former Byzantine cathedral of Haghia Sophia in Istanbul, an official said Friday.

The seraphim figure — one of two located on the side of a dome — had been covered up along with the building’s other Christian mosaics shortly after Constantinople — the former name for Istanbul — fell to the Ottomans in 1453 and the cathedral was turned into a mosque. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas, July 24

July 24, 2009

Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas

Blessed Xavier (Javier) Piferer Bordas Salesian Priest and Martyr
July 24
San Pol de Mar, Spain, September 4, 1914 – Barcelona, Spain, July 23, 1936

Roman Martyrology: Still in Barcelona, Blessed Xavier Bordas Piferrer, religious of the Salesian Society and Martyr who, with his martyrdom witnessed the example of Christ’s life master.

He was born in San Poi de Mar (Barcelona) on September 24, 1914 to a deeply Christian family. His childhood was spent in a very Salesian lifestyle. For six years he studied at the College of Mataro. He took his Religious vows in 1932 and was sent to Rome to study philosophy at the Gregorian University. Together with Don Félix Vivet he went to Spain on holiday on July 17, 1936. In Sarria (Barcelona)he was surprised by the outbreak of civil war. On July 23, he tried to take refuge at a property his parents owned, but was recognized by some people; finding his passport and the identity card of a religious, he was shot on the spot.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, as one of the 201 Blessed Martyrs of Valencia, 42 of which were Spanish Salesians.

Source: Www.sdb.org


Blessed Vasil Hopko, July 23

July 23, 2009

Blessed Vasil Hopko

Blessed Bishop Vasil Hopko Greek-Catholic martyr
July 23
Hrabske (Bardejov), April 21, 1904 – Prešov (Slovakia), July 23, 1976

Born of poor family, he decided to enter the seminary in 1923. He was ordained a priest by the Greek-Catholic Bishop of Presov on February 3, 1929. He graduated in theology in 1940 he was ordained as a bishop on May 11, 1947. Between 1950 and 1964, he was jailed by the Communist regime, undergoing torture. After his release, despite the precarious state of his health, Hopko actively contributed to the renewal of the Greek-Catholic Church. He died on July 23, 1976.
Read the rest of this entry »


Pierluigi Molla, son of St. Gianna Beretta Molla to visit the Cathedral/Shrine of St. Paul on Aug. 3.

July 18, 2009

Five Bob to the Vicar.

Son of Italian saint is coming next month to St. Paul
By The Catholic Spirit
Thursday, 16 July 2009
The public is invited to a presentation next month at the Cathedral of St. Paul by Pierluigi Molla, son of St. Gianna Beretta Molla, who was canonized in 2004.

News Notes


The Catholic Spirit Staff

Afterward, attendees will have an opportunity to venerate a third-class relic of the saint. Pierluigi Molla’s presentation is set for 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3. The St. Paul and Minneapolis Guild of the Catholic Medical Association, the cathedral and the archdiocesan Office for Marriage, Family and Life are sponsoring the event. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Pavol Gojdic, July 17

July 17, 2009

Blessed Pavol GOjdicjpg

Blessed Pavol Gojdic

July 17, 1888, Ruské Peklany near Prešov-July 17, 1960,  Leopoldov

Son of the Greek-Catholic priest Štefan Gojdic and Anna Gerberyová. Attended elementary school at Cigelka, Bardejov and Prešov, finishing in 1907. Studied theology at Prešov and then Budapest where he consecrated himself and his work to the Sacred Heart. Finishing his studies on 27 August 1911, he was ordained soon after. Worked briefly as assistant parish priest with his father. Prefect of the eparchial seminary, and taught religion in a higher secondary school. Supervised protocol and the archives in the diocesan curia. Assistant parish priest in Sabinov. Director of the episcopal office in 1919. Read the rest of this entry »


Possible Michaelangelo self-portrait in Vatican’s Restored Pauline Chapel

July 11, 2009

VATICAN RESTORED CHAPEL

VATICAN CITY – The restoration of Michelangelo’s frescoes in the Vatican’s Pauline Chapel may have produced a special prize — a previously unknown self-portrait of the artist. Read the rest of this entry »


June 6: Blessed Józef Innocenty Guz, Martyr Of Poland

June 6, 2009


Blessed Józef Innocenty Guz, 1890 – 1940 Read the rest of this entry »


May 30: Blessed Marta Maria Wiecka

May 30, 2009

Blessed Marta Maria Wiecka, 1874 – 1904 Read the rest of this entry »


May 24: Blessed Blessed Louis-Zéphirin Moreau Of Canada

May 24, 2009


Blessed Louis-Zéphirin Moreau, 1824 – 1901


May 23: Blessed Józef Kurzawa, New Martyr Of Poland

May 23, 2009

Blessed Józef Kurzawa, 1910 – 1940
Diocesan Priest Martyr


Indulgences

April 3, 2009

Indulgences becoming more widely publicized these days; both plenary and partial indulgences are available, so long as one meets the requirements; in addition to performing the indulgenced act, one must do the following:

  1. Sacramental Confession,
  2. Communion, and
  3. Prayer for the intention of the Holy Father, all to be performed within days of each other if not at the same time

One must also be detached from all sin, even venial sin.

Some indulgences are always available, such as the Plenary indulgence for Eucharistic Adoration (for at least one half hour, partial indulgence granted for a shorter time), some are for limited periods such as an Indulgence for the Souls in Purgatory for visiting a cemetery with devotion and praying for the dead on All Soul’s Day or a week thereafter; Nov. 1-8.

Several churches in my Archdiocese, including the Cathedral, have been declared Pilgrimage Sites for the remainder of the Pauline Year which entails the above-listed requirements plus making a  pious visit to one of the designated Pilgrimage Sites and the participation in a religious function or pious public exercise of devotion in honor of the Apostle Paul while visiting the site.

My normal place of worship is a Pilgrimage site so my biggest requirement is to detach myself from sin;  I confess regularly, receive communion regularly and pray a rosary for the intentions of the Holy Father every day.

Indulgences may be applied to oneself or to the dead. Only one Plenary Indulgence may be earned a day but multiple Partial Indulgences may be earned.


4 Theories on the Date of Christmas

December 2, 2008

nativityscene

Contrary to the popular belief that Christmas was set on Dec. 25 simply to rival a pagan feast, there are at least 4 theories explaining the date from a Christian perspective.  All of them may be true.

Theory 1: Day of Creation and the Conception of Jesus.

David Bennett at Per Christum has an excellent article beginning with this explanation:

The main reason early Christians chose December 25th for the date of Christmas relates to the date of the creation of the world. Jewish thought had placed the date of creation on March 25th, and it was early Christian writer Sextus Julius Africanus who suggested that Christ became incarnate on that date (it makes great symbolic sense!).

According to Sextus Julius, since Christ became incarnate from the moment of his conception, this means that, after 9 months in the Virgin Mary’s womb, Jesus was born on December 25. While the scope of Julius’ influence is unknown, nonetheless, we encounter a Jewish reason why the date of December 25th was chosen for the birth date of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »


Will the Feminists Riot?

August 21, 2008

This week a Catholic blogger came out in support of Barack Obama despite the candidate’s position on abortion. More interesting to me than that a liberal blogger at the controversial Vox Nova would ignore the evil of abortion was a comment to the effect that Feminists would riot if Roe v. Wade were overturned. I had never thought of this. Here is digbydolben’s comment:

What often fascinates me about Americans is not just how divided your country is, but, also, how little certain elements of the population know other elements: obviously a great many people writing here have little or no knowledge of the millions of “feminists” presently living in America who consider the right to “control their reproductive systems” as a basic human right now.

I, however, have known many of this type of “modern woman” during my time in the United States, and I can tell you, “Father J,” that, if you succeeded in criminalizing abortion in certain states, or if you succeeded in passing an Amendment to the Constitution repealing Roe vs Wade, or if the Supreme Court were tipped by Republican appointments toward a reversal of Roe vs. Wade, these women would take to the streets; they’d burn your courthouses down, their feelings regarding this “right” are so strong. Read the rest of this entry »


Orthodox Metropolitan Soft on Sacred Tradition

August 5, 2008

Metropolitan Kallistos Ware was waxing philosophical in the wake of the Lambeth Conference, presenting a soft approach to Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture. There are some interesting parallels with an earlier post of mine, Orthodox EP Soft Like Anglicans on Abortion, in that these comments are given with the intention of being sympathetic with the current Anglican predicament. Still, this cannot be understood as mere diplomatic speech as it was given in the wake of the Vatican’s stunningly frank language on the same matters delivered by Cardinal Kasper just days prior. The full interview is found here.

An interesting exerpt (emphasis mine):

… First, I admire deeply the way in which Archbishop Rowan is fulfilling his role as Archbishop of Canterbury, at this moment of crisis. It’s easy to say, with reference to his position here at the Lambeth Conference or generally in the current Anglican world, that he is in a no-win situation. But granted the immense difficulties that he is facing, he is not doing too badly. Now, what should he be doing here at Lambeth? Should he be offering very firm and clear leadership, insisting on a particular point of view, putting forward resolutions to the plenary gathering of the bishops for their acceptance? He has not chosen to do that. Some people feel disappointed. Some people feel he should be doing that. But if he were to do that, it would create confrontation and division. If you walk through the mountains and you find a large rock in your path, one method is to kick it out of the way. The other is to walk around it and go on with your journey. Now Archbishop Rowan has probably understood that if he tries to kick this particular stone, or this double rock – the ordination of women and homosexual relations – if he tries to confront it head-on and insist on a clear expression of the position of the Anglican Communion, to kick the stone out of the path, he is likely to hurt his toe. Read the rest of this entry »


Damian Thompson on “China’s Vile Persecution Of Christians”

July 23, 2008

China’s vile persecution of Christians

Posted by Damian Thompson on 07 Apr 2008  at 12:17 
I’m thrilled that China’s Olympic propaganda stunt turned into such a fiasco yesterday and sorry that someone didn’t throw the torch into the Thames. But this is not just about Tibet: it would have been nice to see huge crowds of Christians yesterday, protesting at the vile persecution of believers in mainland China.
Defiant faith: Bishop John Han was imprisoned on 11 occasions
Take a look at this picture from a video on the website of the wonderful Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need. It shows Read the rest of this entry »

Evangelicals Moving to Obama is Media Hoax

July 21, 2008

I am vindicated!

As I have long suspected, (December 10, and January 4) the evangelical vote is not moving toward Obama as the MSM has been reporting since last November. In fact, support for Obama among Evangelicals at this point in the election cycle (25%) is slightly less than it was for John Kerry (26%) four years ago! GetReligion.org reports this media hoax based on Pew research figures. Read the rest of this entry »


Witness the Devotion of a New Generation

July 20, 2008

I know the music is contemporary and many traditionalists will not like it. Still, it captures the Spirit of modern youth and fits with the Holy Father’s them of the Holy Spirit for WYD 2008. When I saw these images I was truly moved.


WYD: Benedict Bedazzles at Sydney Harbor

July 20, 2008

Having been to two WYD’s (Toronto and Cologne) I can attest that they are supremely powerful experiences. To have the gospel sifted for its specific message for today’s youth by the greatest spiritual authorities on earth is just impossible to express. It is overwhelming.

But, it can be hard to convey that experience to those who were not there.

However, Benedict’s words in themselves, even without all the experiencial props to heighten the experience, have a power to clear ones thinking and set ones heart aright. He seamlessly weaves together concerns for the environment, sexual exploitation, materialism and secularism all in light of the universal spiritual hunger for the Gospel. Powerful!

Here are some of his words at Sydney Harbor on Thursday:

“…Dear friends, life is not governed by chance; it is not random. Your very existence has been willed by God, blessed and given a purpose (cf. Gen 1:28)! Life is not just a succession of events or experiences, helpful though many of them are. It is a search for the true, the good and the beautiful. It is to this end that we make our choices; it is for this that we exercise our freedom; it is in this – in truth, in goodness, and in beauty – that we find happiness and joy. Do not be fooled by those who see you as just another consumer in a market of undifferentiated possibilities, where choice itself becomes the good, novelty usurps beauty, and subjective experience displaces truth. Read the rest of this entry »


Former Anglican Bishop, Catholic Convert, Jeffrey Steenson on Anglocatholicism

July 17, 2008

Steenson as an Anglican Bishop

Former Anglican Bishop Jeffrey Steenson is widely revered among Anglicans as a man of profound integrity and service in the Lord’s vineyard. Last week he spoke at the Anglican Use Conference. He spoke with his usual clarity and Anglican eloquence. Welcome home, Jeffery.

His full address can be found here.

It all begins with the conviction that the Catholic Church simply is. She is not one option amongst many. People who become alienated from their own churches will sometimes think that the next step is to go down to the marketplace and see what is on offer: which church is going to give me the best deal? Those people seldom find the Catholic Church because they have missed the essential point – the fullness of Christ’s blessings is not distributed across the ecclesial landscape but flows from the one Church.

Read the rest of this entry »


June 13: Blessed Marianna Biernacka, New Martyr Of Poland

June 13, 2008

Blessed Marianna Biernacka, 1888 – 1943 Read the rest of this entry »


June 12: Blessed Florida Civoli

June 12, 2008


June 11: Blessed Choukrallah Maloyan, Armenian Catholic Martyr

June 11, 2008


Blessed Choukrallah Maloyan, 1869 – 1915 Read the rest of this entry »