Indulgences for The Year for Priests, First Thursdays

November 4, 2009

angels adoring eucharist

Indulgences are available for The Year for Priests on the First Thursday of each month.


LA Times on Catholic Outreach

September 11, 2009

5 Bob to the Curt Jester, for linking to an article in the LA Times about a Catholic Outreach program in Sacramento that has had a couple of test runs.

I hope other Dioceses are paying attention. I’m acquainted with and related to many alleged Catholics and would love for them all to return to the church. Some left due to lifestyle changes, others due to changes in marital status; in one case, a man called his daughter to find out if he and his wife ever got their marriage annulled. Not that I have experience in that area, but I don’t think it’s quite that passive a process that it would’ve taken place without his knowledge or memory thereof, so if it had been annulled, he’d know.

Others have issues regarding church teaching. Nothing I can do about that but pray and tell them to shut up when they say nasty things about the Pope or the Church in my presence.

What is it, about 30% of Baptized Catholics sit in the pews each Sunday? I don’t know if that’s accurate but I think it’s close.


Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, September 1

September 1, 2009

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, Priest and Martyr

Villacreces, Spain, September 3, 1912 – Barcelona, Spain, late August / early September 1936

He is remembered on September 1


Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, Martyr Pedro Rivera, a priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, Maria Carmela Moreno Benítez and Maria del Rifugio Carbonell Muñoz, Institute of virgin Mary Help of Christians, who in the same persecution, complied with the Passion of Christ the Bridegroom, came to the reward of eternal peace.

Candido Rivera Rivera was born September 3, 1912 at Villacreces in the Spanish diocese of Leon. Entering the Order of Friars Minor Conventual with the name of Pedro, he made his novitiate in Granollers and he made his temporary vows in 1928. Posted in Italy to attend his theological studies in Osimo, he made his solemn vows in Rome in 1933, while in 1935 he obtained a licentiate in theology and was ordained a priest.

“ He then returned home and, despite his young age, he was appointed superior of the community of Granollers, in recognition of his moral qualities, spiritual and cultural. He always showed genuine disciple of St. Francis, full of love for the consecrated life, excellent higher education, humble and kind to the brethren, a man of peace, particularly pious and devout to the Blessed Sacrament and the Virgin Mary.

“ At the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Father Pedro was expelled from the monastery with his fellow revolutionaries and sought refuge with some family friends. However, he was discovered and arrested on July 25, 1936. So he just had to prepare for the imminent martyrdom confessing to the priest of Llinas, who confided: “If I have the grace to be killed, die shouting ‘Long live Christ the King.” Two days later he was released and went to Barcelona, but was arrested again August 22. Probably between late August and early September 1936 he was shot. Everyone immediately considered him a martyr of the faith.

“ Pedro Rivera Rivera and her fis brothers belonging to the Order of Friars Minor Conventual were Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II with a group made a total of no less than 233 martyrs of that persecution.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, August 24

August 24, 2009

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr
Gmina Żarnowiec, Poland, February 21, 1908 – Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942

Blessed Maksymilian Binkiewicz, Polish diocesan priest, was born in Gmina Żarnowiec (Olkusz) February 21, 1908 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 together with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp at Dachau near Munich in Germany, Monaco, blessed Maximian Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr, who, during the war, was deported by the invading soldiers from Poland because of his faith in Christ and he died under torture and torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, August 21

August 21, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, Priest and Martyr
August 21

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 others from the Archdiocese of Valencia who were victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Alberic on the territory of Valencia in Spain, blessed Savior Estrugo solves, priest and martyr, who, during the persecution endured for the love of Christ every hardship to obtain the palm of victory.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Albocacer da Modesto, August 13

August 13, 2009

Blessed Modesto da Albacar

Blessed Albocacer Modesto (Modesto Garcia Marti),Priest and Martyr
Modesto, Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880 – Valencia, August 13, 1936

Roman Martyrology: At the village of Albocàsser in the same region in Spain, Bl Modesto García Martí, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who during the persecution against the faith with martyrdom crowned the evangelical precept.

Fr Albocácer was born in Modesto, the diocese of Tortosa and the province of Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880. He was the third of seven children of a Christian family, whose parents were D. Francisco Garcia and Donna Joaquina Martí. He was baptized on January 19, 1880 in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Albocácer. As a child he entered the Seraphic Seminary of the Capuchins of the Province of Valencia in Massamagrell. He took the habit in the same convent on January 1, 1896; took his temporary vows January 3 1897 and perpetual vows on January 6, 1900. He completed his studies in philosophy and those of Orihuela to Massamagrell theology, and was ordained a priest on December 19, 1903. He lived most of his apostolic ministry as a missionary in Colombia in the Custody of Bogota. On his return to Valencia was appointed guardian for several years.

Those who knew him speak of him as a priest dedicated to apostolic preaching, spiritual exercises, spiritual direction, … which were, among others, his favorite activities. So said those who lived with him: “His field of apostolate favorite – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was preaching, spiritual exercises and the direction of souls. I heard criticism ever in its work “. He enjoyed a reputation for holiness among the faithful. “His was a peaceful temperament. His most remarkable quality – notes Mr. Daniel Garcia – was kindness. He enjoyed good a reputation among his companions of religion and among the faithful. He was loyal observant of the Franciscan Rules and Constitutions.”

At the time of the Revolution was the guardian of national Olleria (Valencia), where “the community was violently destroyed, the convent and the church destroyed by fire, the pine wood cut from the same monastery, destroyed the walls, so that everything was reduced nothing “. When communications were restored, P. Modesto went to his country and took refuge in the house of his sister Teresa, along with his brother Miguel Mosen priest, pastor of Torrembesora. For her safety he fled the farm la Masa, where he was captured by armed militiamen. P. Modesto was delivered with gentleness and humility – said Mr. Arturo Adell – and without any protest. His attitude during this period – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was the total abandonment to the Lord and an exemplary life.” He was killed at four in the afternoon of August 13, near the basin of the Valley Albocácer between the farm and the Masa, about 600 meters from the farmhouse, on the same road that goes from the farm to the country. After the release of Albocácer exhumations were the remains of P. Modest and then found that his skull had been crossed from side to side by a large nail. His remains – according to Mr. Felipe Mateu were buried in a mass grave of the cemetery in the country and are currently resting in a niche of the cemetery.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 as one of 17 Blessed Spanish Capuchins of Valencia.

Source: Holy See


LA Priest helps parishioners stay out of foreclosure

August 10, 2009

Another non-traditional pastoral duty. My pastor once mentioned that going through seminary, he thought all he’d have to deal with was religious issues and was surprised to find that he must sometimes be involved in other sorts of issues, such as paying attention to political matters, when infrastructure changes may affect his building.

~~~

Saving souls and homes: LA Priest labors to keep his flock out of foreclosure

By CHRISTINA HOAG , Associated Press

Last update: August 5, 2009 – 11:07 AM

LOS ANGELES – A priest’s typical mission is saving souls, but the Rev. John Lasseigne has a more down-to-earth goal — saving homes.

That’s like trying to work a miracle in Lasseigne’s Roman Catholic parish of Pacoima, a blue-collar corner of the San Fernando Valley where bank sale signs sprout faster than weeds. One in nine homes is in default, making it one of the nation’s hardest hit towns in the foreclosure crisis.

“We’re talking thousands of foreclosures,” said the 44-year-old priest at Mary Immaculate Church. “I was stunned.” Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed German of Carcaixent, August 9

August 9, 2009

Blessed German of Cartaxeint

Blessed German of Carcaixent (José Maria Hernandez Garrigues) Capuchin Priest and Martyr
Carcaixent, Valencia, Spain, February 12, 1895 – 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Carcaixent in Valencia in Spain, Blessed Germanus ( José Maria) Garrigues Hernández, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who, during persecution against the faith, won the tortures of body with precious death.

Father was born in Germán Carcagente (Valencia), in the bosom of a Christian family, February 12, 1895. He was baptized on his day of birth in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Carcagente Confirmation was received on July 22, 1912 by Bishop Athanasius Fr. Royo Soler, duly authorized by the archbishop of the diocese. In the family of D. Juan Bautista and Donna Garrigues Ana María Hernández were born eight children, three of whom became like our Capuchin, José Maria. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, August 8

August 8, 2009

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, Priest and Martyr
Rogoznica, Poland, January 30, 1886 – Gusen, Austria, August 8, 1940

Wlodzimierz Laskowski, a priest of the Archdiocese of Poznan, fell victim of the Nazis in their hatred of the Christian faith. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution. While they were beatified together, their deaths took place separately so there is not a collective memorial.

Roman Martyrology: At Gusen Germany blessed Vladimiro Laskowski, priest and martyr, who, in times of war, was deported for his faith in this prison camp and, cruelly tortured, reached the glory of martyrdom.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Gaetano Thiene, August 7

August 7, 2009

Saint Gaetano ThieneSaint Gaetano Thiene, Priest

Vicenza, October 1480 – Naples, August 7, 1547
Born in Vicenza to the noble family of Thiene in 1480, and baptized with the name of Gaetano, in memory of his famous uncle, who was called so because he was born in Gaeta.  Protontario apostolic of Julius II, left Leo X in the papal court maturing, especially nell’Oratorio of Divine Love, the joint experience of prayer and service to the poor and the excluded. And restoration of the priesthood and religious life, inspired by the Sermon on the Mount and the model of the apostolic Church. Devotee of the crib and passion of the lord, he founded (1524) with Gian Pietro Carafa, bishop of Chieti (Teate), then Paul IV (1555-1559), the Clerics Regular Teatini. For his unlimited trust in God is revered as the saint of providence.

Roman Martyrology: Saint Gaetano da Thiene, a priest who dedicated himself to Naples at the foot works of charity, in particular striving for the sick incurable sponsored associations for the religious formation of the laity and the Clerics Regular instituted for the renewal of the Church, calling for His disciples the duty to observe the ancient lifestyle of the Apostles.

Source: Santi e Beati

How Long do Catholics keep a Pope?

August 7, 2009

Pope john paul IIPope John Paul II

Today I talked to someone who commented on how much he had liked Pope John Paul II but wondered why we had him so long. When I said he was one of the longest reigning Popes ever, the guy said he thought the Pope was elected every four years, just like the President of the US.

I informed him that we keep the Pope until he dies, like the Supreme Court Justices but didn’t think to mention that he lives in our hearts forever.

And chose not to mention that in some cases, we keep them longer.

PopeGregoryVIITombPope St. Gregory VII


Blessed Matteo da Bascio, August 6

August 6, 2009

Blessed Matteo da Bascia

Blessed Matteo da Bascio, founder of the Capuchins
Pennabilli, Pesaro-Urbino, circa 1495 – Venezia, August 6, 1552

Born in the village of Bascio, today in the town of Pennabilli (PU), he became a Franciscan of the Observant branch of the convent of Montefiorentino at Frontino (PU) and was ordained a priest in 1525. Desiring to return to the primitive rigor of Franciscan life, in 1525 he left his monastery and was granted by Pope Clement VII the personal privilege of dressing in a long tunic of rough cloth (such as Francis of Assisi, but with a longer hood and sharp) to observe strictly the rule of absolute poverty, to make a hermitic life and to preach freely. His example gave rise to a number of imitators who began restoring the original spirit of the Franciscan way home and had the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, which thanks to the support of Katherine duchess of Camerino Cybo was approved by the pope on July 3, 1528 with the Bull religionis zelus. In the first general chapter of the order, held in April 1529 in the church of Santa Maria di dell’Acquarella Albacina at Fabriano, Matthew was elected first superior general. Bright omileta, he took part in the great reform movement of the religious life of the sixteenth century. He died in Venice, in the church of San Moisè and buried in the church of San Francesco della Vigna.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. Cassian, August 5

August 5, 2009

st. cassian

St. Cassian, Bishop

Roman Martyrology: At lugdunense Autun in Gaul, now France, St. Cassian, Bishop.

Source: Santi e Beati


Pope Benedict XVI

August 3, 2009

Vacation pope cast

Have you prayed for him lately?


Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, August 3

August 3, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis SeguiBlessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr,Third Spanish Capuchins
August 3

Roman Martyrology: At Alicante in Spain, followed blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr, who spilled the blood of Christ during the persecution against the faith and obtained the palm of victory.

Pope John Paul II Beatified him on March 11, 2001 in St. Peter’s Square, together wtih 232 other victims of the bloody Spanish Civil War. This wide range of martyrs is divided into several subgroups according to the diocese or congregation to which they belong. The Romanum Martyrologium commemorates those blessed individually or in small groups based on the date and place of where the slaughter occurred.

Blessed Salvatore is part of the subgroup José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, August 2

August 2, 2009

Blessed Francis Tomas Serer

Blessed Francesco Tomas Serer Priest and Martyr

Alicante, Spain, Oct. 11, 1911-August 2, 1936

He professed his temporary vows on September, 15, 1928 and his perpetual vows on December 21. 1933. He was Ordained a priest on May 24, 1934, spent his 2 years of ministry in the reformatory of Amurri (Alava) and Carabanchel Bajo (Madrid). He was persecuted and martyred at 24.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II on December 18, 2000, together with 17 others of his order and a layman.

Roman Martyrology: In Madrid always in Spain, Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, a Priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, in the same persecution that deserved to pay the blood of Christ.

Source: Santi e Beati


The Cult of Personality

July 31, 2009

The Cult of Personality has struck again and I’m nervous. Obama is attempting to force through way too much legislation that nobody has read, reviewed or understands. I don’t want to be forced to die when someone decides I’m no longer necessary; on his staff is someone who at one time advocated forced sterilization even though that has already been ruled on by the courts and you can’t do it. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, July 29

July 29, 2009

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, Priest and Martyr
Huesca, November 23, 1872 – Valencia, July 29, 1936

Professed priest of the Salesian Society of Saint John Bosco, born in Azanuy (Huesca), Spain, November 23, 1872, died at the Bridge of St. Josephon the road to Valencia, Spain, July 29, 1936. He is buried at the cemetery Benimaclet in Valencia. Pope John Paul II beatified him on March 11, 2001 together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War from the Diocese of Valencia. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint George Preca, July 26

July 26, 2009

St. George Preca

Saint George Preca, Priest
July 26
Valletta, Malta, February 12, 1880 – July 26, 1962

First Maltese Saint

He was born in Malta on February 12, 1880. As a child, according to the custom of the time, he was incorporated into the Carmelite Family through the imposition of the scapular. He was ordained a priest on December 22, 1906. In the early months of 1907 a small group of young people in their twenties gathered around him. Began as the Society of Christian Doctrine, known commonly Museum, initial letters of “Magister, utinam sequatur evangelium universus mundus” ( “Master, that the whole world follow the Gospel ‘), a work dedicated to education and religious education of children and of young people. Preca, as an adult, became a Carmelite Tertiary: July 21, 1918 then enrolled and professed his vows on September 26 the following year. When he professed, he chose the name of Franco. In 1952, as recognition of his tireless devotion to the disclosure of the Madonna del Carmine, he was affiliated with the Carmelite Order. He died July 26, 1962. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II on May 9, 2001 in Malta and finally canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on June 3, 2007 in Rome. Read the rest of this entry »


Long-lost Mosaic Seraphim Uncovered at Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia

July 25, 2009

Note: Below image is the Archangel Gabriel, not one of the newly uncovered images.

GabrielOfficial: Long-lost mosaic seraphim uncovered at Istanbul’s Haghia Sophia

SUZAN FRASER, Star Tribune

ANKARA, Turkey – Restoration workers have uncovered a well-preserved, long-hidden mosaic face of an angel at the former Byzantine cathedral of Haghia Sophia in Istanbul, an official said Friday.

The seraphim figure — one of two located on the side of a dome — had been covered up along with the building’s other Christian mosaics shortly after Constantinople — the former name for Istanbul — fell to the Ottomans in 1453 and the cathedral was turned into a mosque. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vasil Hopko, July 23

July 23, 2009

Blessed Vasil Hopko

Blessed Bishop Vasil Hopko Greek-Catholic martyr
July 23
Hrabske (Bardejov), April 21, 1904 – Prešov (Slovakia), July 23, 1976

Born of poor family, he decided to enter the seminary in 1923. He was ordained a priest by the Greek-Catholic Bishop of Presov on February 3, 1929. He graduated in theology in 1940 he was ordained as a bishop on May 11, 1947. Between 1950 and 1964, he was jailed by the Communist regime, undergoing torture. After his release, despite the precarious state of his health, Hopko actively contributed to the renewal of the Greek-Catholic Church. He died on July 23, 1976.
Read the rest of this entry »


Pierluigi Molla, son of St. Gianna Beretta Molla to visit the Cathedral/Shrine of St. Paul on Aug. 3.

July 18, 2009

Five Bob to the Vicar.

Son of Italian saint is coming next month to St. Paul
By The Catholic Spirit
Thursday, 16 July 2009
The public is invited to a presentation next month at the Cathedral of St. Paul by Pierluigi Molla, son of St. Gianna Beretta Molla, who was canonized in 2004.

News Notes


The Catholic Spirit Staff

Afterward, attendees will have an opportunity to venerate a third-class relic of the saint. Pierluigi Molla’s presentation is set for 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3. The St. Paul and Minneapolis Guild of the Catholic Medical Association, the cathedral and the archdiocesan Office for Marriage, Family and Life are sponsoring the event. Read the rest of this entry »


Bishop Piché Confirms!

July 16, 2009

scan0001

I know, I posted this same photo a few weeks ago, on the day of Bishop Piché’s Ordination.

He has achieved another milestone; today, at 5:15 Mass at the Cathedral/Shrine of St. Paul, Bishop Piché Confirmed for the first time as a Bishop.

The young man who was Confirmed and received his First Holy Eucharist is in the armed forces and will be deployed. Please pray for his safety as well as the safety of all our soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines.

And when I say airmen? Like the word ‘mankind’,’ airmen’ includes the girls!


Servant of God, Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

June 25, 2009

Archbishop Fulton SheenServant of God, Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

Today isn’t an important date in the life, death or Cause for Canonization of Fulton J. Sheen; he’s topical only because I found a copy of one of his books at a thrift store so am reading Life is Worth Living, a book published in the 50’s from transcripts of his show one season. I haven’t even finished it yet, but am impressed with the relevance of his topics in today’s political climate. He talks about various things, such as Communism and the Constitution and while he’s talking about the USSR, so much of it resonates with current events in the US.

He invokes Article 2 of the Constitution, in which we find the establishment clause, namely, our First Amendment rights; Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Many of these rights are currently under fire.



Blessed Elia del Soccorso (Matteo Nieves), March 10

March 10, 2009

beato-elia-del-soccorso-matteo-nieves-mar-10Blessed Elias del Soccorso (Matthew Nieves)

Yuriria (Guanajuato – Mexico), 1882 – March March 10, 1928

Blessed Elias was an Augustinian priest who was ordained in 1916, five years later he was appointed vice parish priest at La Cañada de Caracheo (Gto.-Mexico). In this center, poor and without health care and education, not only did he work in pastoral ministry but also in the manual labor to help his faithful nell’indigenza and poverty. The pastoral ministry of Father Nieves found many obstacles and difficulties because of the social situation dominated by hatred and rivalry that resulted in forms of anti-hard. It costs were the priests who were in the midst of poor people. P Nieves took place far from any revolutionary movement. Despite his timid nature, rather than to obey the government order to reside in cities, he settled in a cave near a hill, thus ensuring the faithful support of religion. The priest was illegal for 14 months. Upon arrest, when he was questioned he declared his religious condition. On the morning of March 10, 1928 it was announced that he had come the hour of his death. Fr Nieves asked for a moment of recollection, gave his blessing to the soldiers and began the recitation of the Creed, while they prepared their weapons to shoot them. His last words were: Long live Christ the King

Roman Martyrology: Near the city of Mexico Cortázar, Blessed Elias del Soccorso (Matthew Elias) Nieves del Castillo, a priest of the Order of Saint Augustine and martyr, who, while persecution raged, was arrested because of carrying on a concealed ministry, was shot and died due to hatred for the priesthood. Read the rest of this entry »


Proposed Connecticut Legislation Interferes with Roman Catholic Church Operations

March 7, 2009

Fr. Z has a post about this bill. As though it isn’t simply outrageous that the State of Connecticut would interfere with a religious corporation, the bill under consideration, singles out the Roman Catholic Church. The objective is to change the structure of the church, removing all power from the Archbishop for anything but pastoral care and putting it into the hands of the laity.

Furthermore, it would abrogate the rights of the church to keep documents private and provide that anyone may copy any church business records with a few days notice, without defining business records. There is neither a provision about payment for those copies , nor any information about privacy rights.

Government proposes to interfere for no good reason in the operation of one Church. This would inhibit the sovereignty of said religion and would entangle government therewith. It looks like religious discrimination to me.

Not only that, it seems like sour grapes of a pro-gay state, which doesn’t like the teaching of the Catholic Church and will do whatever is harmful.

Whoever wrote this bill may believe that because it targets operations rather than actual religious practice, they’re off the hook for discrimination, but I doubt it.  This bill is targeted to one religion so doesn’t pass the smell test. Where I live, bills must be neutral on their face.


Farewell Avery Cardinal Dulles, stalwart defender of the faith

December 13, 2008

dulles

It is a sad day.  Cardinal Dulles, the only Catholic convert among his leading American family, he was a formidable pioneer of Catholic orthodoxy through an era of theological and liturgical chaos.  Among his Jesuit confreres, he was an unflinching defender of the faith in every way the spirit of the age challenged her.  Read the rest of this entry »


Defending Truth & Contending For The Faith?

October 28, 2008

I came across the following odd quote using WordPress.com’s “tag surfer feature”. I am not surprised by the content, per se… I have been dealing with non-Catholic and anti-Catholic apologists for over a decade. I usually respect them as sincere, and never take it personally.

But what I find odd… well first read it first for yourself…

<!–[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]–> The Roman Catholic religion claims that the Bible does not contain all the truths which a Christian is bound to believe (The Faith of Our Fathers, p. 72). Catholicism also says the Bible does not contain everything God taught about salvation (A Catechism for Adults, p. 52); is not clear and intelligible (The Faith of Our Fathers, pgs. 70, 152); is a dead book (Question Box, p. 67); and does more harm than good (Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent, p. 274). These, and many other comments against the Bible, reveal that Catholicism is not a loyal friend of the Bible but a forceful enemy that needs to be confronted. Roman Catholicism constantly seeks to undermine, weaken, oppose and nullify the Bible from its God-ordained place of authority.

SOURCE: http://defendingcontending.com/2008/10/28/quotes-404

The thing of it is, I HAVE read The Faith Of Our Fathers by James Cardinal Gibbons. In high school, it actually kept me Catholic when I was preparing to leave the Catholic Church. I have read it (and done so more than once) and didn’t recall anything of the sort being attributed to that text in the actual book.

But I haven’t read it for at least 10 years… so fair is fair, some due diligence to see what this gentleman is possibly referring to, I used Google Books (The Faith of Our Fathers is public domain) to check out the pages cited. You can do the same.

So having read the full text of each page cited (at least using the page numbers offered compared to the online edition which matches up with the TAN edition, as the TAN edition – that I owned – was a facsimile reproduction of the same…)  I am still just as befuddled.  In each instance, the pages offered aren’t even related to discussion of Scriptures.

So my question to Mike Gendron is, what are the exact quotes you found in The Faith of Our Fathers  that back up your assertions?  Have you read the book, or are you quoting from someone who claims to be quoting it?


The Kingdom of Heaven

September 21, 2008

I love the movie Kingdom of Heaven. It combines my three favorite subjects in the whole world: the Church; the military and history. I was thinking about that movie and modern popular culture in America this past weekend. For all of my love of the movie, there are things about it that just drive me up the wall. My opinion is that if you are going to make a movie based on historical events then get the history right! The producers got so much of it right that it would be easy to overlook what they got wrong. The costumes were right, the major events were (for the most part) right, the weapons were right, the tactics were right and the characters were (mostly) right.

One thing I found particularly offensive was the portrayal of the monastic orders of knights. A major blunder was that none of the characters portrayed as Templar knights were actually Templar knights in real life. Teutonic knights were portrayed as little more than thugs and henchmen better suited to make an appearance in a mob movie. Read the rest of this entry »


Bishop: English Church has Lost its Way

August 28, 2008

Soon to retire Bishop of Lancaster Patrick O’Donoghue issues landmark document on the English Church, the Catholic Herald reported today.


The Church in England and Wales is losing its Catholic identity, a senior bishop said this week.

Bishop Patrick O’Donoghue of Lancaster made the claim in a 92-page document highly critical of the direction of the Church in the past 40 years The document, described by several parish priests as “dynamite”, addresses declining vocations, falling Mass attendance and the future of the Church. Read the rest of this entry »


Gay Parish is Part of Brisbane Gay Network, May Get Closed

August 26, 2008
According to Queensland Pride, there is a broader network of gay parishes in Brisbane, Australia, which the Archbishop ought to be looking at.  Again with the identity politics.
See Also: St. Mary’s, Brisbane Told: Be Catholic or Be Shut Down.

“In reality St Mary’s South Brisbane has taken a Roman Catholic parish and established its own brand of religion,” Bathersby wrote.

The church has previously angered conservatives in the church by welcoming gay couples and allowing the Brisbane Gay and Lesbian Choir to perform there in June 2003 as part of Brisbane Pride Festival celebrations. Bathersby opposed the performance and said it was “inappropriate”.

However, gay Catholic activist and St Mary’s parishioner, Tony Robertson, told Queensland Pride supporters were rallying to save St Mary’s.

“The response and support from across all social justice networks has been overwhelming,” Robertson said. Read the rest of this entry »


Memories of Good Shepherd Parish, circa 1970-75, Part I

August 25, 2008

A Short Series recording my childhood memories of the most avant garde Catholic parish in the nation.

Part I: Confetti and Streamers

About the same time the new Roman sacramentary came out, there was in the Washington, D.C. area an enormous and dynamic movement among Catholics to put into motion the Spirit of Vatican II which was then sweeping the globe with promises of great radical changes. The Charismatic Movement was sweeping through at the same time.

One such movement was the Mass People movement in the District which set up liturgies in various public places around the city, in parks, community centers, at national monuments, anywhere on the city streets. The radical idea these liturgies embodied with the new erradication of the divide between the sacred and the profane. With the elimination of the communion rail and the sanctuary open to all, there could no longer be a real separation between the holy and the ordinary. This was a liturgical embodiment of the the Spirit of Gaudium et Spes, as well, the joys and hopes of the world becoming the joys and hopes of the Catholic Church.

* * *

Born in 1965, my first memory of going to church was walking there when we lived on an Army base in 1969. At four, somehow was etched in my psyche a church with blue curtains (military chapel), the men in their uniforms and the boys, like me, in shirt and ties.

My next memory was at our new parish when we moved to Northern Virginia, Good Shepherd Catholic Church. I remember my mother taking me over to the statue of the Virgin Mary to the left of the altar and explaining to me that I should light a candle with her and say a prayer for my sister who had died and needed my prayers. It was a sweet memory. I knew my prayer was important and that it made my sister and God happy. That was the last truly traditional Catholic experience I would have for many, many years. Our new parish had a new pastor… Read the rest of this entry »


St Mary’s , Brisbane told: Be Catholic, or Be Shut Down

August 25, 2008

Yes, it happen in the Catholic Church. A parish can be quashed for going astray of Church teachings, liturgical norms and other practices antithetical to the Catholic faith. This parish has now been given fair warning.

From The Courier Mail:

In a three-page letter delivered to parish priest Father Peter Kennedy on the weekend, Archbishop Bathersby said St Mary’s was operating outside practices and policies acceptable to the Roman Catholic Church.

The church – where women can preach, homosexual couples can be blessed and social justice is championed – has a congregation of about 700 that would be the envy of many parishes.
Read the rest of this entry »


Liturgical Reforms Arrive in Bangladesh

August 22, 2008

First Communion at Holy Cross College, Dhaka,

run by the Congregation of Holy Cross

HH Benedict XVI’s call to reform the practice of the liturgy takes root in Bangladesh. I am personally pleased to see that Holy Cross is taking a leading role in liturgical reform.

BANGLADESH Church Tries To Protect Traditional Hymns, End Loud Singing

DHAKA (UCAN) — Bangladeshi Catholic hymns are “out of control,” sometimes sung too loudly or performed by pop-style bands, so much so that some claim the deep spirituality the music is meant to inspire gets lost.The Episcopal Commission for Liturgy and Prayer (ECLP) has responded to the problem by trying to bring order to the chaos and restore a level of uniformity and a proper atmosphere for Bangla-language hymns. It did so in a six-day training program for liturgical music experts and performers that was conducted July 13-18 at the Holy Spirit Major Seminary in Dhaka. Read the rest of this entry »


Benedict to Beijing?

August 21, 2008

Benedict the Re-Gatherer may strike again soon–in China!

According to the AP:

ROME (AP) — The Beijing bishop appointed by China’s state-controlled Catholic Church said in an interview Wednesday that he hopes Pope Benedict XVI will visit his country and that relations with the Vatican are improving.

“We strongly hope that Benedict XVI will make a trip to China,” Joseph Li Shan told Italy’s RAI state TV. “Relations with the Vatican are constantly improving. We can say that there are big developments.” Read the rest of this entry »


Will the Feminists Riot?

August 21, 2008

This week a Catholic blogger came out in support of Barack Obama despite the candidate’s position on abortion. More interesting to me than that a liberal blogger at the controversial Vox Nova would ignore the evil of abortion was a comment to the effect that Feminists would riot if Roe v. Wade were overturned. I had never thought of this. Here is digbydolben’s comment:

What often fascinates me about Americans is not just how divided your country is, but, also, how little certain elements of the population know other elements: obviously a great many people writing here have little or no knowledge of the millions of “feminists” presently living in America who consider the right to “control their reproductive systems” as a basic human right now.

I, however, have known many of this type of “modern woman” during my time in the United States, and I can tell you, “Father J,” that, if you succeeded in criminalizing abortion in certain states, or if you succeeded in passing an Amendment to the Constitution repealing Roe vs Wade, or if the Supreme Court were tipped by Republican appointments toward a reversal of Roe vs. Wade, these women would take to the streets; they’d burn your courthouses down, their feelings regarding this “right” are so strong. Read the rest of this entry »


What is Wrong with Post Modern Religion in 2 minutes 39 seconds

August 15, 2008

“I think it is up for each one of us to interpret what God wants.”

Post modernism is the direct fruit of Sola Scriptura, by which everyone can just come up with their own interpretation of revelation.


Telegraph: ‘Substantial number’ of clergy will leave over plans for women bishops

August 14, 2008

Here is the bombshell:

A group of 14 traditionalist bishops claim that there are “irreconcilable differences” over historic reforms that would introduce women as bishops without giving proper concessions to oponents of the move.

In a letter to 1,400 clergy who have indicated that they are considering defecting from the Church of England, they are highly critical of a decision by the General Synod – the Church’s parliament – to ignore proposals for a compromise over the divisive issue. Read the rest of this entry »


Anglican Bitterness over Converts to Rome

August 14, 2008

It’s all over the net. All kinds of talk about Anglicans swimming, put on swim trunks, taking the plunge, testing the waters, dipping the toe, crossing over, etc. It will be a wonder if the Tiber can handle the traffic as well as it handles the copious references to the metaphor … if they all come.

Those who do come are deserving of a hearty welcome from those of us standing along the shore. They certainly will have paid a hefty price in strained and even lost friendships as they have made a momentous and meaningful journey to the Catholic Church.

As an Anglican watcher I have noticed a distinct pattern on most Anglican blogs. Whenever something positive about the Catholic Church is posted there is a strong and bitter reaction among many of the commenters. Antipathy toward the Catholic Church is deeply ingrained in the minds of Anglicans and protestants from an early age. So it erupts almost without reflection whenever the moment calls for it. It has been particularly heavy in the wake of word of talks between some Diocese of Fort Worth Episcopal clergy and the local Catholic bishop.

Here is an example of the kind of visceral bitterness that has surfaced at blogs like the Continuum: Read the rest of this entry »


Tiber Crossings, Anglican Mass Conversion in Fort Worth?

August 12, 2008

5 Bob to: Midwest Conservative Journal:

Will the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth make the ultimate jump?

A delegation of Episcopal priests from Fort Worth paid a visit to Catholic Bishop Kevin Vann earlier this summer, asking for guidance on how their highly conservative diocese might come into “full communion” with the Catholic Church.

Whether that portends a serious move to turn Fort Worth Episcopalians and their churches into Catholics and Catholic churches is a matter of dispute.

The Rev. William Crary, senior rector of the Fort Worth diocese, confirmed that on June 16 he and three other priests met with Bishop Vann, leader of the Fort Worth Catholic diocese, and presented him a document that is highly critical of the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.

The document states that the overwhelming majority of Episcopal clergy in the Fort Worth diocese favor pursuing an “active plan” to bring the diocese into full communion with the Catholic Church.

While declining to specify what that might mean, Mr. Crary said it likely would not mean “absorption” by the Catholic Church.

He cast the initiative as following Anglican and Catholic leaders in longstanding efforts to bring the two groups into greater cooperation, with the ultimate goal of honoring Jesus’ call in John 17:21 for Christian unity.

“These discussions between the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion have been going on for 42 years,” he said. “We would like to bring these down to the local level.”

But other local Episcopalians interpret the meeting and document differently.

“There’s a very serious attempt on the part of Episcopal clergy in the Diocese of Forth Worth to petition Rome for some kind of recognition,” said the Rev. Courtland Moore, who is retired as rector of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Arlington.

“They make it clear that they no longer believe there is truth in the Anglican Communion, and the only way they can find truth is reunion with Rome.”

Mr. Moore is co-chairman of Steering Committee North Texas Episcopalians, a group that wants the Fort Worth diocese to remain in the Episcopal Church. He obtained a copy of the document the priests gave to Bishop Vann and made it available to reporters. Read the rest of this entry »


Map: Largest Non-Catholic Denominations by State

August 12, 2008

It’s not all surprising, but some of this is shocking. This map from Adherents.com, shows us the largest denominations in each state after the Catholic Church is excluded. Catholicism which comprises about 25% of the US population is the largest single church in the country, that is, the Catholic Church has the largest plurality. Read the rest of this entry »


St. Peter Claver

August 12, 2008

For those convinced that the Catholic Church was forcing conversions in New Spain, let me introduce you to St. Peter Claver.

A native of Catalonia, Spain, Peter Claver spent all his adult life in Cartagena, Colombia, the center of the slave trade in the new world. Appalled at the dehumanization of the whole dirty business of slave trading, he made a personal vow in addition to those of his religious profession as a Jesuit–that until his death, he would serve and advocate on behalf of the Africans sold into slavery.

While the commonly regarded among Europeans as little more than advanced animals, he insisted that they were truly equal in worth and dignity to the Europeans. In his lifetime Peter Claver ministered to over 300,000 Africans brought to South America as slaves. Despite the contempt for him among the merchant and landed classes, his work was supported by the Jesuit Order and he was canonized a saint by Pope Leo XIII in 1888. His work and writings along with others such as Bartolome de las Casas, while broadly rejected in his time laid the foundation for the eventual rejection of the institution of slavery by the Catholic Church and the European powers by the early 19th Century.

An exerpt from one of his letters: Read the rest of this entry »


5 Transalpine Redemptorist – Now Known As Sons Of The Most Holy Redeemer Seminarians to study in the US

August 12, 2008

It’s a long way from the windswept shores of Papa Stronsay, Northern Scotland to the plains of Nebraska. The robust traditionalist community, the Transalpine Redemptorists, having restored its relationship with Rome, it will now send 5 of its youngest members to study theology at the Society of Saint Peter’s seminary, in Denton, Nebraska. Read the rest of this entry »


Vatican ‘Surprised’ at Plan to Move Parish into Anglican church

August 11, 2008

Sts. Peter and Paul Church, Wirral, to be abandoned

No, it’s not a case of Church swapping.  They are going to live together.  Ignoring all recent developments to the contrary, some “ecumenists” will not be deterred from their plans to blur the important distinctions between Anglicanism and Catholicism.  Apparently, this wacky idea includes the dumping of a grand Depression-era basilica style Catholic church building. Read the rest of this entry »


Inca Processional Hymn from 1631

August 11, 2008

“Hanacpachap cussicuinin” is processional hymn in the Quechua language of Peru (Inca), this piece was most likely written by a native composer and later published by the Franciscan scholar Juan Pérez Bocanegra in 1631, thus becoming the first example of polyphony printed in the Americas.

Read the rest of this entry »


Fr. Joseph Gelineau, SJ, dead at 87

August 11, 2008

If you are Catholic, over 60 and into liturgical music, you will know his name and remember his psalm tones which were all the rage in the early 60’s. His psalm tones were much influenced by Gregorian chant, had simple, poignant phrasing typically in a minor tone conveying an often sad-sweet, sublime mood appropriate to the ancient liturgy but also modern. His later chants written for the Taize community were much brighter in spirit and reached several generations of European youth seeking access to the contemplative through music. Read the rest of this entry »


HLI Video: Pro-Life Counselors Homosexually Assaulted

August 11, 2008

Abortionists hire thugs to homosexually assault sidewalk counselors:

View Video: Read the rest of this entry »


TLM Parished Closed in Britain Despite Strong Attendance

August 11, 2008

Sanctuary of St John the Evangelist, Allerton Bywater

It seems this little charmer of a Church with strong attendance will be permanently close a week from today. Tragic.

Next Sunday, a thriving little Catholic church in Yorkshire mining country which just happens to offer the traditional Latin Mass will be shut by the Bishop of Leeds, Arthur Roche (who, I learn, is a patron of an organisation called STOP – Start Treating Others Positively).

After I posted about this yesterday, parishioners of St John the Evangelist, Allerton Bywater, have contacted me with heartbreaking messages of support for their priest and their church. The more I learn, the more cruel the decision of the diocese appears. Read the rest of this entry »


Orthodox Metropolitan Soft on Sacred Tradition

August 5, 2008

Metropolitan Kallistos Ware was waxing philosophical in the wake of the Lambeth Conference, presenting a soft approach to Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture. There are some interesting parallels with an earlier post of mine, Orthodox EP Soft Like Anglicans on Abortion, in that these comments are given with the intention of being sympathetic with the current Anglican predicament. Still, this cannot be understood as mere diplomatic speech as it was given in the wake of the Vatican’s stunningly frank language on the same matters delivered by Cardinal Kasper just days prior. The full interview is found here.

An interesting exerpt (emphasis mine):

… First, I admire deeply the way in which Archbishop Rowan is fulfilling his role as Archbishop of Canterbury, at this moment of crisis. It’s easy to say, with reference to his position here at the Lambeth Conference or generally in the current Anglican world, that he is in a no-win situation. But granted the immense difficulties that he is facing, he is not doing too badly. Now, what should he be doing here at Lambeth? Should he be offering very firm and clear leadership, insisting on a particular point of view, putting forward resolutions to the plenary gathering of the bishops for their acceptance? He has not chosen to do that. Some people feel disappointed. Some people feel he should be doing that. But if he were to do that, it would create confrontation and division. If you walk through the mountains and you find a large rock in your path, one method is to kick it out of the way. The other is to walk around it and go on with your journey. Now Archbishop Rowan has probably understood that if he tries to kick this particular stone, or this double rock – the ordination of women and homosexual relations – if he tries to confront it head-on and insist on a clear expression of the position of the Anglican Communion, to kick the stone out of the path, he is likely to hurt his toe. Read the rest of this entry »