Reclaiming Christmas from the Mall

November 27, 2009

On this Eve of Black Friday, it turns out that there are people who don’t worship at the altar of the retail gods the day after Thanksgiving.

What I find striking about this article, coming from the Catholic tradition, in which Mass is available every day of the week, is that the Unitarians have to have a special service on Black Friday. They have nothing scheduled otherwise. Apparently they just go to church on Sunday and call it good.

Granted, I live in a historically Catholic area, and there are churches with Mass in the morning, convenient for people before work; but there’s a church three blocks from my workplace with 12:10 Mass every day. And there are several in the area with 5:15 pm daily Mass. Sometimes, like Thanksgiving, the schedule is curtailed, and there’s only one Mass and no Confession.

Tomorrow? Many churches with daily Mass will be on their regular schedule. If not? The Cathedral where I live is on its regular schedule. I bet the Basilica is too. If you need a respite from extreme shopping, there’s a Catholic Church near you with Mass, Confession and Adoration.

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All Souls Day Plenary Indulgences for the Poor Souls in Purgatory for All Souls Day

November 1, 2009

All Souls

Plenary indulgences for the Poor Souls in Purgatory are  granted to the faithful who:

On All Souls Day, November 2, piously visit a church, a public oratory or — for those entitled to use it — a semipublic oratory. This is easy. There are plenty of Requiem Masses in my area, but even if that’s not true in where you are, there should also be Daily Mass as usual.

In visiting the church or oratory, it is required, according to recite “one Our Father and the Creed.” Another easy one as that’s included in Mass.

You must also pray at least one Hail Mary and one Our Father, or other appropriate prayer for the Pope’s intentions.

Communion must be received;

You must also go to Confession; and,

Have no attachment to sin, even venial sin.


LA Times on Catholic Outreach

September 11, 2009

5 Bob to the Curt Jester, for linking to an article in the LA Times about a Catholic Outreach program in Sacramento that has had a couple of test runs.

I hope other Dioceses are paying attention. I’m acquainted with and related to many alleged Catholics and would love for them all to return to the church. Some left due to lifestyle changes, others due to changes in marital status; in one case, a man called his daughter to find out if he and his wife ever got their marriage annulled. Not that I have experience in that area, but I don’t think it’s quite that passive a process that it would’ve taken place without his knowledge or memory thereof, so if it had been annulled, he’d know.

Others have issues regarding church teaching. Nothing I can do about that but pray and tell them to shut up when they say nasty things about the Pope or the Church in my presence.

What is it, about 30% of Baptized Catholics sit in the pews each Sunday? I don’t know if that’s accurate but I think it’s close.


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Pope Preaches in Public after breaking wrist

July 19, 2009

You didn’t think a little thing like a broken wrist would slow him down, did you? Please join me in praying that Pope Benedict may heal easily and remain in good health.

The pope celebrates mass with his broken wrist in plaster.

ROME, Italy (CNN) — Pope Benedict XVI preached and greeted well-wishers Sunday, three days after breaking his wrist in a fall. Read the rest of this entry »


Summer Sunday Mass: Obligation or Option?

July 3, 2009

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By Father Michael Van Sloun – Special for The Catholic Spirit

Tuesday, 23 June 2009

Sunday is the Lord’s Day. Jesus rose from the dead on Sunday morning, so Sunday is reserved as the “Lord’s Day,” the day to remember the Resurrection and to offer our praise and worship. Sunday is the Christian “Sabbath,” a shift from the Jewish Sabbath that runs from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday. God gave us the Third Commandment as a solemn obligation, not a suggestion or an option: “Keep holy the Sabbath day (Ex 20:8-11; Dt 5:12-15) (see the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Numbers 2174 – 2178). Read the rest of this entry »


10 Years Later: Ritus Narcissus: Why Do We Sing Ourselves and Celebrate Ourselves?

March 1, 2009

Ritus Narcissus:
Why Do We Sing Ourselves and Celebrate Ourselves?

by Father Paul Scalia

Imagine the following scene: You arrive at Mass on Sunday, eager to thank God for His goodness to you. You slide into the pew early, kneel in prayer, and direct your praise and worship to your Lord and God. You stand as the song leader introduces the opening hymn: “Table of Plenty”. Suddenly your praise comes to a screeching halt, not because of your own prayers, but because of what you are singing. In fact you are no longer praising God at all, but singing to the others:

Come to the feast of heaven and earth!
Come to the table of plenty!
God will provide for all that we need,
here at the table of plenty. Read the rest of this entry »