Reclaiming Christmas from the Mall

November 27, 2009

On this Eve of Black Friday, it turns out that there are people who don’t worship at the altar of the retail gods the day after Thanksgiving.

What I find striking about this article, coming from the Catholic tradition, in which Mass is available every day of the week, is that the Unitarians have to have a special service on Black Friday. They have nothing scheduled otherwise. Apparently they just go to church on Sunday and call it good.

Granted, I live in a historically Catholic area, and there are churches with Mass in the morning, convenient for people before work; but there’s a church three blocks from my workplace with 12:10 Mass every day. And there are several in the area with 5:15 pm daily Mass. Sometimes, like Thanksgiving, the schedule is curtailed, and there’s only one Mass and no Confession.

Tomorrow? Many churches with daily Mass will be on their regular schedule. If not? The Cathedral where I live is on its regular schedule. I bet the Basilica is too. If you need a respite from extreme shopping, there’s a Catholic Church near you with Mass, Confession and Adoration.


All Souls Day Plenary Indulgences for the Poor Souls in Purgatory for All Souls Day

November 1, 2009

All Souls

Plenary indulgences for the Poor Souls in Purgatory are  granted to the faithful who:

On All Souls Day, November 2, piously visit a church, a public oratory or — for those entitled to use it — a semipublic oratory. This is easy. There are plenty of Requiem Masses in my area, but even if that’s not true in where you are, there should also be Daily Mass as usual.

In visiting the church or oratory, it is required, according to recite “one Our Father and the Creed.” Another easy one as that’s included in Mass.

You must also pray at least one Hail Mary and one Our Father, or other appropriate prayer for the Pope’s intentions.

Communion must be received;

You must also go to Confession; and,

Have no attachment to sin, even venial sin.


LA Times on Catholic Outreach

September 11, 2009

5 Bob to the Curt Jester, for linking to an article in the LA Times about a Catholic Outreach program in Sacramento that has had a couple of test runs.

I hope other Dioceses are paying attention. I’m acquainted with and related to many alleged Catholics and would love for them all to return to the church. Some left due to lifestyle changes, others due to changes in marital status; in one case, a man called his daughter to find out if he and his wife ever got their marriage annulled. Not that I have experience in that area, but I don’t think it’s quite that passive a process that it would’ve taken place without his knowledge or memory thereof, so if it had been annulled, he’d know.

Others have issues regarding church teaching. Nothing I can do about that but pray and tell them to shut up when they say nasty things about the Pope or the Church in my presence.

What is it, about 30% of Baptized Catholics sit in the pews each Sunday? I don’t know if that’s accurate but I think it’s close.


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Pope Preaches in Public after breaking wrist

July 19, 2009

You didn’t think a little thing like a broken wrist would slow him down, did you? Please join me in praying that Pope Benedict may heal easily and remain in good health.

The pope celebrates mass with his broken wrist in plaster.

ROME, Italy (CNN) — Pope Benedict XVI preached and greeted well-wishers Sunday, three days after breaking his wrist in a fall. Read the rest of this entry »


Summer Sunday Mass: Obligation or Option?

July 3, 2009

51772329

By Father Michael Van Sloun – Special for The Catholic Spirit

Tuesday, 23 June 2009

Sunday is the Lord’s Day. Jesus rose from the dead on Sunday morning, so Sunday is reserved as the “Lord’s Day,” the day to remember the Resurrection and to offer our praise and worship. Sunday is the Christian “Sabbath,” a shift from the Jewish Sabbath that runs from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday. God gave us the Third Commandment as a solemn obligation, not a suggestion or an option: “Keep holy the Sabbath day (Ex 20:8-11; Dt 5:12-15) (see the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Numbers 2174 – 2178). Read the rest of this entry »


10 Years Later: Ritus Narcissus: Why Do We Sing Ourselves and Celebrate Ourselves?

March 1, 2009

Ritus Narcissus:
Why Do We Sing Ourselves and Celebrate Ourselves?

by Father Paul Scalia

Imagine the following scene: You arrive at Mass on Sunday, eager to thank God for His goodness to you. You slide into the pew early, kneel in prayer, and direct your praise and worship to your Lord and God. You stand as the song leader introduces the opening hymn: “Table of Plenty”. Suddenly your praise comes to a screeching halt, not because of your own prayers, but because of what you are singing. In fact you are no longer praising God at all, but singing to the others:

Come to the feast of heaven and earth!
Come to the table of plenty!
God will provide for all that we need,
here at the table of plenty. Read the rest of this entry »


Happy First Birthday Summorum Pontificum!

July 7, 2008


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Institute of the Good Shepherd

June 24, 2008

5 bob to Traditional Vocations Blog which writes:

Institute of the Good Shepherd

 


ego sum pastor bonus: et cognosco meas, et cognoscunt me meæ
I am the good Shepherd: and I know Mine, and Mine know Me (
Jn. 10:14)

Under the Roman calendar of 1962, yesterday was often called “Good Shepherd Sunday”, so called because the Gospel tells us of Jesus as the Good Shepherd. As pointed out on The New Liturgical Movement this also means it was a feast day for the Institute of the Good Shepherd.

The Institute of the Good Shepherd is a Society of Apostolic Life of traditionalist Priests in full communion with the Holy See. Founded only in September 2006, the Institute has grown quickly. Read the rest of this entry »


J.I. Packer Quits Anglican Church of Canada

April 30, 2008

J.I. Packer Quits Anglican Church of Canada

Packer, 81, is one of the most renowned evangelical theologians. He is joining a more orthodox traditional Anglican group – See this story.
————————–
Gravatar I am going to have a Mass offered for the intention of his conversion and those has influenced to the Catholic Church. Folks interested in doing the same can do so at the Catholic Near East Welfare Association where for $5 a priest in desperate need will be supported.
Keep going Rev. Packer!

Holy Father, Ohio Can Top That!

April 18, 2008

45,000+ people at the papal Mass with 500,000+ people wanting tickets between DC & NY…

It occurs to this Buckeye we can top that here in Ohio, easily. With a seating capacity of 102,329 (not counting seats on the field),  plenty of lodging, great parking, and an good airport in Columbus… The Pope could stay up the street at the Pontifical College Josephinum (he literally owns the place, he does have a room there)…

Just doing the math, 5 Masses over 5 days…  That adds up. 

Maybe next time, eh? Think about it.

And Rob from AZ – you are welcome to sleep on the couch as you take in the glory of the Heartland. What are friends for?  You bring the beer.


Father Mitch Pacwa On The Aging Left

April 16, 2008

Father Mitch Pacwa On The Aging Left


SOURCE: http://thenewliturgicalmovement.blogspot.com/2008/04/fr-mitch-pacwa-sj-on-liturgy.html

…The left is aging and has no young followers to push its agenda. The young either become apathetic about a faith emptied of its truth and power through the progressive agenda, or they become orthodox. I describe the heterodox liberals as spiritual geldings and spays; they have removed the essentials of their faith and cannot reproduce, bringing in neither converts nor vocations. The best they can do is make geldings and spays of those who do possess the faith: this is not an appealing prospect for most people.

 

Over a decade ago I met Father Pacwa.  He is just as amazing and impressive in real life.


Isn’t “Eat My Flesh” Just Symbolic?

April 6, 2008


Q. When Jesus said, “This is my body, eat it,” my friend says he was speaking symbolically?

A. No, that would be impossible. In the Aramaic language that Jesus spoke, to symbolically “eat the flesh” or “drink the blood” of someone meant to persecute and assault him. Did you know that there are several places in the Bible where “eating flesh and drinking blood” is used in a symbolic or metaphorical way? Lets take a look at what this phrase means when it is used metaphorically.

Psalm 27:2 When evil men advance against me to devour my flesh, when my enemies and my foes attack me…”
Micah 3:2-3 you who hate good and love evil;…who eat my people’s flesh…
Rev 17: 6 I saw that the woman was drunk with the blood of the saints, the blood of those who bore testimony to Jesus.
Rev. 17:16 The beast and the ten horns you saw will hate the prostitute. They will bring her to ruin and leave her naked; they will eat her flesh and burn her with fire.

So, we see that when “eating flesh” and “drinking blood” is used metaphorically or symbolically in the Bible it means destruction and murder. And it is still true today. If you got a letter that said someone wanted “to eat your flesh and drink your blood” you would take it as an evil threat of some kind and not an invitation to loving communion. Jesus was speaking literally in John 6 but no one would know just what He had in mind until the Last Supper. Communion in His body and blood is literal but not cannibalistic. Jesus feeds us spiritually with Bread from Heaven. Only the faithful stayed with him. Only faith helps us believe Him.

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,


Where is the Real Presence in the Eucharist in Scripture?

April 4, 2008


Q. Where in the Bible does it say that Jesus is actually bodily present in the bread and wine of the Eucharist?

A. In John 6, After demonstrating His power to feed 5,000 people with a few loaves and fishes, Jesus tells his listeners seven times that they must eat His flesh and drink His blood in order to have eternal life. The Jewish leaders and even some of Jesus’ followers rejected this teaching as preposterous and left him at this time, precisely because they understood Him to be speaking literally. One year later, Jesus instituted Eucharistic Communion (Mt. 26:26) saying of the bread, “This is my body” and also of the cup, “This is my blood.” From the beginning of Christianity, Church Fathers describe the mystery of the miraculous transformation of the Eucharistic meal into Christ’s Presence under the appearance of bread and wine.

Q. But how do we know for sure Jesus meant this literally?

A. We can ask ourselves, “What did the earliest Christians believe about communion?” The writings of the early Church Fathers tell us what these first century Christians believed about the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. In 110 A.D. St. Ignatius of Antioch, who was taught the Christian faith by the apostle John, wrote about the heretics of his day:

“They abstain from the Eucharist and from prayer, because they do not confess that the Eucharist is the Flesh of our Savior Jesus Christ. Flesh which suffered for our sins and which the Father, in His goodness raised up again.” Letter to the Smyrneans 6,2

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,


Is the Mass a Meal or a Sacrifice?

April 2, 2008


Q. Is the Mass a communal meal or a sacrifice?
A. It is both.
First, it is a re-presentation of Jesus’ sacrificial death on the cross. At the mass, the scrim of time is pulled away and we communally leave “Now” and enter the precincts of the Eternal. Everything looks normal. But, the spiritual reality is that we are transported “back in time” to the foot of the Cross, with Holy Mary and St. John, as well as, the angels and archangels. All present themselves to adore our Blessed Lord’s sacrifice at calvary.

And then, in obedience to Jesus, we partake of a communal meal of His body and blood under the appearance of bread and wine.

“Jesus said to them, “I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood abides in me, and I in him.” John 6: 53-58

Q. Then, is Jesus dying over and over?
A. No.
For Christ… died for sins once for all” (I Peter 3:18)
The sacrifice of Christ happened once, in time, and is an historical fact. Unlike the sacrifices in the Old Testament, Christ’s sacrifice is eternal. It is we, who are in time, who must return over and over in thanksgiving to adore Him and be nourished for our journey to heaven.

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,


Ad Altare Dei

March 16, 2008
st-iggy5.jpg

I recently found a fascinating artifact, a “People’s Mass Book” dated 1966, the year the transitional sacramentary came out in both English and Latin. It was the period when every so often a new piece of the mass would come out in the vernacular. In the Order of the Mass at the opening of the rite, I found this:

Read the rest of this entry »