Blessed Jan Beyzym, October 2

October 2, 2010

Blessed Jan BezymBlessed Jan Beyzym

Beyzymy Wielkie, Volhynia, 15 May 1850 – Marana, Madagascar, October 2, 1912

The Servant of God Father John Beyzym was born in Beyzymy Wielkie in Volhynia May 15, 1850.  After finishing high school in Kiev, he entered the novitiate of the Jesuits in Stara Wieś near Brzozów.  Received Holy Orders in Krakow from the hands of Bishop Albin Dunajewski in 1881. For many years he was an educator and patron of young people in the colleges of the Society of Christ in Tarnopol and Chyrow. Read the rest of this entry »


May 23: Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski

May 23, 2010


Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski, 1869 – 1940


Father Jacques Marqette, May 18

May 18, 2010

Father Marquette preachingFather Jacques Marquette

Laon, France, June 1o, 1637 – May 18, 1675, Ludington, MI

Father Jacques Marquette SJ, sometimes known as Pere Marquette, was a French missionary who founded Michigan’s first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first non-Native Americans to see and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

Jacques Marquette was born in Laon, France, on June 1, 1637 and joined the Society of Jesus at age seventeen. After working and teaching in France for several years, he was dispatched to Quebec in 1666 to preach to the Native Americans, where he showed great proficiency in the local languages, especially Huron. In 1668 Father Marquette (French: Père Marquette) was redeployed by his superiors to missions farther up the St. Lawrence River in the western Great Lakes. He worked at Sault Ste. Marie and at the Mission of the Holy Spirit in La Pointe, on Lake Superior, near the present-day city of Ashland, Wisconsin. Here, he came into contact with members of the Illinois tribes, who told him of the existence of the Mississippi River and invited him to come teach further south. Because of wars between the Hurons at La Pointe and the neighboring Dakota people, however, Father Marquette had to relocate to the Straits of Mackinac; he informed his superiors about the rumored river and requested permission to explore it.

Leave was granted, and in 1673, Marquette was joined by Louis Joliet, a French Canadian explorer. They departed from St. Ignace on May 17, with two canoes and five other voyageurs of French-Indian ancestry. They followed Lake Michigan to the Bay of Green Bay and up the Fox River. From there, they portaged to the Wisconsin River, which they were told led to the river they sought. On June 17, they entered the Mississippi near Prairie du Chien.

The Joliet-Marquette expedition traveled to within 435 miles (700 km) of the Gulf of Mexico but turned back at the mouth of the Arkansas River. By this point they had encountered several natives carrying European trinkets, and they feared an encounter with explorers or colonists from Spain.[2] They followed the Mississippi back to the mouth of the Illinois River, which they learned from local natives was a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. They returned to Lake Michigan near the location of modern-day Chicago. Marquette stopped at the mission of St. Francis Xavier in Green Bay in September, while Joliet returned to Quebec to relate the news of their discoveries.

Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. In the spring of 1675, the missionary again paddled westward and celebrated a public Mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery picked up during the Mississippi expedition, however, had sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.

The Michigan Historical Marker at this location reads:

Father Marquette Memorial Father Jacques Marquette, the great Jesuit missionary and explorer, died and was buried by two French companions somewhere along the Lake Michigan shore on May 18, 1675. He had been returning to his mission at St. Ignace which he had left in 1673 to go exploring in the Mississippi country. The exact location of his death has long been a subject of controversy. A spot close to the southeast slope of this hill, near the ancient outlet of the Pere Marquette River, corresponds with the death site as located by early French accounts and maps and a constant tradition of the past. Marquette’s remains were reburied at St. Ignace in 1677. ”

His grave is now located at what is currently the Ojibway Museum on State Street in downtown St. Ignace. Father Marquette is memorialized in several towns and rivers that bear his name (such as Marquette, Michigan), as well as the Father Marquette National Memorial near St. Ignace. Pere Marquette State Park near Grafton, Illinois, is located at the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and is the site where Indians of the Illini Confederation showed Marquette a faster return route to the Great Lakes.

SOURCE


Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, November 26

November 26, 2009

Saint Leonardo de Porto Maurizio, Priest
Porto Maurizio, Imperia, 1676 – Rome, November 26, 1751

It is this saint to whom we owe the credit for having conceived the Via Crucis. Ligure (1676-1751), was the son of a sea captain. Born in Porto Maurizio, Imperia today, he studied in Rome at the Collegio Romano, then entered the retirement of St. Bonaventure, on the Palatine Hill, where he would wear the Franciscan habit. Posted in Corsica by the Pope to restore harmony among the citizens, he was able to obtain, despite the serious divisions among the inhabitants, an unthinkable embrace. The theme of the Cross was at the center of his preaching drew crowds to repentance and Christian piety. Alfonso Maria de Liguori called him “the greatest missionary of our century.”

Roman Martyrology: In Rome in the convent of Saint Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, Priest of the Order of Friars Minor, who, full of love for souls, engaged all his life in preaching, in publishing books of devotion and to visit in over three hundred missions in Rome, Corsica and Northern Italy.

Young Franciscan Leonardo had asked to be a missionary in China. Cardinal Colloredo had replied: “Your China will be Italy.”

And at the end of the seventeenth century, Italy had enough misery and misfortune enough to be considered mission territory.

Leonardo was a student in Rome, when a friend suggested going to hear a sermon. A few steps, they found that a hanged man dangling from the gallows. “This is the sermon,” said the two young men.
A few days later, the son of a sea captain of Porto Maurizio, Liguria, followed by two figures of monks who climbed to the convent of San Bonaventura on the Palatine Hill, where he donned the habit of the Franciscans called “the riformella” or “displaced” .

Devoting himself to preaching, perhaps remembering that torture hanging from the gallows, including Leonardo was always in mind the other execution, hanging on the Cross. Therefore, his favorite theme was that of the Via Crucis, typically Franciscan devotion to which he gave the largest spread.

His preaching had something dramatic and tragic, often by torchlight and voluntary torture, which underwent between Leonardo, now placing his hand on the torch lit, now scourging blood.

Immense crowds flocked to hear him and be impressed by his fiery speech, which re-called to repentance and Christian piety. “He is the greatest missionary of our century,”said St. Alphonsus de Liguori. Often, the entire audience, during his sermons, burst into sobs.

He preached throughout Italy, but the region of Tuscany was beaten because of the cold Jansenism, he wanted to fight first of all with the fervor of his heart, then with his themes more effective, namely the Name of Jesus, the Madonna and the Via Crucis.

In a visit to Corsica, the island’s troubled robbers fired their muskets into the air, shouting: “Viva friar Leonardo, long live peace.”

Back in Liguria, was launching a galley, named in his honor, San Leonardo. But he was gravely ill, the sailors said: “The boat is water.”

Consumed by the missionary labors, he was finally recalled to Rome, where, with his impassioned sermons, which also assisted the Pope, he prepared the spiritual climate for the Jubilee of 1750. On that occasion, he planted the Via Crucis at the Colosseum, declaring that place sacred to the martyrs.

Historians have also demonstrated that the Colosseum was never martyred Christians, but the preaching ~ in good faith – of San Leonardo prevented the further destruction of the monument, hitherto regarded as a quarry of good stone.

It was his last effort. He died the following year, and San Bonaventura al Palatino it took the soldiers to hold back the crowd who wanted to see the Holy priest and take away his relics. “We lose a friend on earth – the Pope Lambertini said – but we gain a protector in heaven.”

It was he who suggested the definition of the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception, through consultation letters with all the pastors of the Church.

Source: Parish Archives

Note: The site of the Compagnia di San Leonardo da Porto Maurizio

source: Santi e Beati


The Priest Hunts

November 7, 2009

Rev Christopher Wenthe

Here’s an interesting article about a priest who hunts.  He grew up in a family that hunted, which is typical in Minnesota; we rank 5th in state for number of hunters. There’s really no reason to think about the morality of hunting, as it’s what people do here.

This particular priest is in a rural area, so of course they hunt.

Read the article.

It’s deerhunting season.


Blessed Vincenzo Grossi, November 7

November 7, 2009

Blessed Vincenzo Grossi

Blessed Vincenzo Grossi, Priest
Pizzighettone, Cremona, March 9, 1845 – November 7, 1917

Blessed Vincent Grossi was born March 9, 1845 in Pizzighettone (CR): next to last of seven brothers. In 1866 he entered the seminary of Cremona and was ordained May 22, 1869. First he was commissioned to curate in several parishes, then a parish priest in 1873 and in 1883 he went to Regona Vicobellignano.

He had… for all the illustrious example of poverty, a spirit of self-denial, austere life, totally subservient obedience to the Pope and his bishop. So with gentleness, combined with a usual good humor and geniality – which recommended warmly to his sisters – are easily won over the confidence of many to win for Jesus Christ.

In 1885 he founded the Institute of the Daughters of the Oratory, giving rules in the spirit of St. Philip Blacks and the charisma of the Christian education of youth. He died November 7, 1917, when we celebrate the liturgical memorial. Read the rest of this entry »


St. Gaetano Errico, October 29

October 29, 2009

Blessed Gaetano ErricoBlessed Gaetano Errico

October 19, 1791, Secondigliano, Italy-10 am, October 29, 1860

Second of nine children born to Pasquale, a pasta factory manager, and Marie Marseglia Errico, who worked weaving plush. A good child, pious, always ready to help his father at work, or with his younger siblings. He felt a call to the priesthood at age fourteen. He was turned away by the Capuchins and Redemptorists due to his youth. Studied at a diocesan seminary in Naples from age sixteen, walking the five miles to class each day, and was ordained on 23 September 1815 in Naples. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Luigi Guanella, October 24

October 24, 2009

Blessed Luigi Guanella

Blessed Luigi Guanella, Priest and Founder
Fraciscio of Campodolcino, December 19, 1842 – Como, October 24, 1915

Luigi Guanella was born in Fraciscio of Campodolcino (Sondrio) in 1842. In 1866 he became a Priest. In his pastoral activity ahe pproached the experiences of Cottolengo and Don Bosco, who he met in Turin, with whom he spent three years. In 1881 he founded the Servants of Charity and the Daughters of St. Mary of Providence. Soon they spread from Como in Italy and also to America, Asia and Africa. In Rome, with the help of Pope Pius X, was built the basilica of St. Joseph Transit. Orion Don Guanella intervened in the earthquake of Marsica: January 1915. He died a few months later. He was Beatified in 1964 by Pope Paul VI.

Roman Martyrology: At Como, Blessed Luigi Guanella, the priest who founded the Congregation of the Servants of Charity and the Daughters of St. Mary of Providence to take care of the needs of the poor and the afflicted and to ensure their safety.

Source: Santi e Beati


Father Emil Kapuan, Servant of God

October 19, 2009

Father Emil Kapuan

Pilsen, KS, April 20, 1916-Korea, May 23, 1951

The only relation today has with Father Kapuan, is that I learned more about him during the Deacon’s homily. He served in WWII and upon return home asked to be reassigned to the Chaplain Corps so went to Korea. In Korea he was captured, escaped with assistance from his comrades, but was recaptured the next day as he was ministering to the wounded on the battlefield. Despite having been assigned to a more comfortable barracks as an officer, he snuck out and ministered to the enlisted men, Catholics and Protestant, until he was no longer able to do so. He died in captivity.

I had previously read that he was nominated for the Medal of Honor, the US Military’s highest decoration. Of course, more relevant to those of us who are Catholic, is that he was elevated to Servant of God in 1993 and the Diocese of Wichita opened his Cause for Canonization on June 29, 2008.

For anyone in or near Kansas, the date of the annual Military Pilgrimage to Pilsen is November 11.

If you can afford to, please support his cause; I’m sure they accept outright donations, but there’s a memorabilia section on the Cause webpage. You can buy Father Kapuan dogtags or many other items to support this cause. For those of you with Catholic relatives in the military, there are also two different styles of Father Kapuan rosaries. The perfect patron for someone on the front lines.


Blessed Thomas Helye, October 19

October 19, 2009

helye

Blessed Thomas Helye, Priest
Biville, France, October 19, 1257

Roman Martyrology: At Biville near Cherbourg in Normandy, Blessed Thomas Helye, priest, who undertook the days in the exercise of sacred ministry, the nights in prayer and penance.

There is especially known for contemporary report written by Clement immediately after his death, and worthy of credit because its author could make use of the minutes of the investigation conducted by the Bishop of Coutances in 1260 and the depositions of witnesses of miracles.

The son of Elijah and Matilda, Thomas Helye was born in the early thirteenth century, at Biville at Cherbourg. He was first governor to Biville and then to Cherbourg, where he directed a school. He was diligent to the offices and undergoing corporal mortification, fasting several times a week. Having made a pilgrimage to Rome, he returned to Paris to study theology and was ordained to the 1236.

For twenty years he devoted himself to the apostolate traveling in all the parishes of the diocese of Coutances avran-ches and, accompanying his preaching with exercises of piety and austerity, which caught the imagination of his listeners. When he arrived in a parish, he said: “Behd the man of God! . His devotion to the Eucharist was high and several times came to be favored during the celebration of Holy Mass.

The traditions that say that Thomas Helye had exercised his ministry outside the diocese, and especially the two short S. Louis as chaplain, are not based on any serious foundation. He died October 19, 1257.

Since 1260 he had his chapel in the church of Biville and that same year, Jean d’Essais, Bishop of Coutances, was to begin the process of canonization in Rome, having conducted an investigation, which Clement used to write the Life. In 1266, Eudes Rigaud, archbishop of Rouen, on a visit to Biville, found evidence of the extraordinary miracles derived from the servant of God in the fourteenth century. The parish church of Biville gradually changed its patronage and became the church of Saint Thomas. In 1794, during the French Revolution, the inhabitants were able to to rescue his relics and prevent their desecration.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Isaac Jogues, October 18

October 19, 2009

Saint Isaac Jogues

Saint Isaac Jogues, Priest and Martyr
Orléans, France, January 10, 1607 – Ossernenon, Canada, October 18, 1646

He was born January 10, 1607 at Orleans in France. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and in 1636, after receiving ordination, he was sent to North America to evangelize indigenous peoples. Hhe went to the Great Lakes, where he lived for six years always exposed to various dangers. In 1642, Isaac Jogues, Rene Goupil and coadjutor with the forty Hurons, fell into an ambush stretched by the Iroquois. They were all tortured and savagely mutilated. The night they put them on the floor, naked and chained, and pour over them hot coals and ashes. Jogues was transferred to Albany, where the merchants Dutch Calvinists helped him to escape. He returned to France. But in 1644 the missionary departed for Canada. Two years later he was shot in the neck and decapitated. There were eight Jesuit Martyrs in North America, all Beatified in 1925 and Canonized in 1930 by Pope Pius XI.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Ossernenon in Canada, the passion of St. Isaac Jogues, Jesuit Priest and Martyr, who was enslaved by some pagans and had his fingers mutilated, then died with his head smashed by a blow of the ax.

More information about St. Isaac may be found here.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Jose Canet Giner, October 4

October 4, 2009

Blessed Jose Canet Giner

Blessed Jose Canet Giner, Priest and Martyr
October 4

Roman Martyrology: Near the town of Gandia in the same territory in Spain, Blessed Jose Canet Giner, Priest and Martyr, who for his loyalty to Christ deserved to be associated with the sacrifice of the Savior. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo, October 3

October 3, 2009

Blessed Crescenzio Garcia PoboBlessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo, Priest and Martyr
April 15, 1903 Ccladas (Teruel)-October 3, 1936


Garcia Pobo, Crescenzo was born April 15 1903 Ccladas (Teruel), In 1927 he made his perpetual vows and was ordained a priest September 16 ,1928. He carried out the apostolate among children in various rehabilitative centers. Religious smiling, simple and humble, he distinguished himself for his generous dedication to youth in distress. He was with a group of eight who were surprised by the militia in the Reformatory S. Rita Madrid and locked in the manager. Aware of the imminence of death, a witness said: “We made a collective act of contrition, and we took each other absolution. There was a profound silence. ” Released through the intervention of the President of the juvenile court, they were again arrested and killed on dates and places of Madrid.

Roman Martyrology: At Madrid in Spain, blessed Crescenzo Pobo Garcia, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of the hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, who, during the persecution against the faith, shed his blood for Christ.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs, Spanish Tertiary Capuchins, 19 Spanish members of the Congregation of Our Lady of Sorrows Capuchin Tertiary (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigo y Rerrer, and a sister, also a Capuchin Tertiary, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). The cause of canonization of these twenty religious Martyrs was conducted at the archidiocese of Valencia together with seven other cases relating to as many cases of the martyrdom of members of different religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these causes, May 13, 1997 the Positio super martyrdom was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints. These 20 religious Martyrs were Beatified as part of the 233 Blessed Spanish Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II.

Author: Agripino Gonzalez


Source:
Santi e Beati

Blessed Crescenzio Garcia Pobo

Blessed Maria de Leon Alacuas (Emanuele Legua Martí), September 26

September 26, 2009

Blessed Maria de Leon Alacuas (Emanuele Legua Mars)

Blessed Maria de Leon Alacuas (Emanuele Legua Martí), Priest and Martyr
Alacuas (Valencia) April 23 1875-September 26


Roman Martyrology: In Madrid, also in Spain, blessed Leone (Emanuele) Legua Martí, a Priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of the hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, in the same persecution that still got the crown of glory.

Leone (Emanuele) Legua Martí EIA was born in Alacuas (Valencia) April 23, 1875. He entered the congregation June 21, 1890, professed temporary vows on June 17 ,1892, perpetual vows on April 12, 1904 and was ordained a priest July 15, 1906. He occupied high positions in the institution and promoted religious observance. With great apostolic zeal against the boys from reeducate, he was the director of the Reformer in Madrid at the outbreak of civil war. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Joseph Pasquale Raimondo Ferrer Botella, September 24

September 24, 2009

Blessed Joseph Pasquale Raimondo Ferrer Botella

Blessed Joseph Pasquale Raimondo Ferrer Botella, Priest and Martyr
September 24


Roman Martyrology: In the village of Abalat de la Ribera in the territory of Valencia in Spain, Blessed Joseph Pasquale Raimondo Ferrer Botella, Priest and Martyr who suffered martyrdom during the persecution against the faith.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, as one of 233 Blessed Spanish Martyrs of Valencia

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Vincent Ballester Far, September 23

September 23, 2009

Blessed Vincent Ballester Far

Blessed Vincent Ballester Far, Priest and Martyr
September 23

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Benisa in the territory of Valencia in Spain, blessed Vincent Ballester Far, Priest and Martyr, who, during the persecution, faced the glorious battle for Christ.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II as one of 233 Blessed Spanish Martyrs of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Vincenzo Pelufo Corts, September 22

September 22, 2009

Blessed Vincenzo Pelufo Corts

Blessed Vincenzo Pelufo Corts, Priest and Martyr
September 22

Roman Martyrology: At Alzira in the territory of Valencia in Spain always, Blessed Martyr Vincenzo Pelufo Corts, Priest, who, during the same persecution against the faith, deserves to carry the palm of victory before God Almighty.

One of 233 Blessed Spanish Martyrs of Valencia, Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. Francis Jaccard, September 21

September 21, 2009

St. Francis JaccardSt. Francis Jaccard, Priest and Martyr
+ Vietnam, September 20, 1838


Roman Martyrology: In the fortress of Quang-Tr in Annam, now Viet Nam, the holy martyr Francis Jaccard, a priest of the Society for Foreign Missions of Paris, who, under Emperor Minh Ming, for Christ, suffered imprisonment and beatings and died, finally, strangled.

He was born in Onion (now dioc. Annecy) on Sept. 6. 1799 and then completed his studies in the seminaries of Melanie and Chambery, came in 1821 in the Foreign Missions of Paris. Ordained a priest, he was sent to the mission of Cochin China, and appointed Metropolitan General, took up residence at Phuong-Ru. Denounced by a treacherous pay (14 July, 1827), when he saw the village surrounded by soldiers, managed to hide in the thick of a forest of bamboo, but then, seeing no escape and ruin on the other hand, fearing that if he was not found, the fury of the troops would be unleashed upon the faithful, came out of hiding and surrendered to the soldiers. Conducted to Hue, he was charged with various translations and was able to earn the esteem of so deeply attached to the court, which obtained permission for him to return to his missionary work, while continuing to deal with any translation requirements. But he always lived in a state of alert because the prosecution did not promise in place a secure life. While, in fact, he was in the Christian village of Duong-Son, the pagans of the nearby village of Lao Cai-accused him of having led his people to rob, which is perfectly true. But the prefect did not accept his defense and informed the king, which put the punishment.

Past court to court, he was first sentenced to death and then his sentence was commuted to exile in the province of Ai-Lao (1833), then at Cam-Lo.

But here’s a novel question: the school is open from Candah Di-Loan aroused the ire of the king, who ordered its destruction, promoting, at the same time, surveys to find out what part he ad the Jaccard. Mandarins recognized him innocent, but no other questions, told him to apostate, his refusal to do so resulted in the Canga and chains being imposed and he was dragged to the prison in Quang-Tri, where he found his future companion in martyrdom, Tommaso Thien. There he had to undergo many floggings until he could no longer stand. Later the tongs were burning in the thighs thickened, thus burning his flesh to the bone, finally, on Sept. 20. 1838 he suffered death by strangulation, along with Thien.

The bodies of the martyrs were buried in them were, side by side, and in 1847 the relics were transported to Paris in the seminary of Foreign Missions. He was beatified by Pope Leo XIII on May 27. 1900. Canonized on June 19, 1988 by Pope John Paul II, together with 117 other Martyrs of Tonkin.

Author: Celestino Testore

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Laureano (Salvatore) Cardet Ferrer, September 16

September 16, 2009

Blessed Laureano (Salvatore) Cardet Ferrer

Blessed Laureano (Salvatore) Cardet Ferrer was born in Burriana (Castellón) August 13, 1884, made his first vows in 1900 and perpetual vows April 12, 1907; the set. the same year was ordained a priest. He distinguished himself for his great piety and charity. He died a martyr at age 52. He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 18 other Spanish Tertiary Capuchins of Our Blessed Martyrs, a subgroup of 233 Spanish Martyrs of Valencia.

Roman Martyrology: In the town of Turís in the territory of Valencia in Spain always, Blessed Martyr Laureano (Salvatore) Cardet Ferrer, Priest, of the Third Order of St. Francis of hoods of the Blessed Virgin of Sorrows, that in the same persecution, killed by man, God raised to the kingdom of heaven.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Miegon, September 15

September 16, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Miegon

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Miegon, Priest and Martyr
Samborzec, Poland, September 30, 1892 – Dachau, Germany, September 15, 1942


Blessed Wladyslaw Miegon priest chaplain, was born in Samborzec (Sandomierz) September 30, 1892 and died in Dachau, Germany, September 15, 1942. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish Martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: Near Monaco of Bavaria in Germany, Blessed Ladislaus Miegon, Priest and Martyr who, deported from Poland for his faith subjugated by a regime enemy of God and men at the Dachau prison camp, came through the torture crown of glory.

Source: Santi e Beati


Father Thomas Frederick Price, September 12

September 12, 2009

Father Thomas Frederick Price
August 19, 1860, Wilmington, North Carolina-September 12, 1919, Hong Kong

Father Price is the first Native North Carolinian priest. He is Co-Founder of the Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America.

Diocese of Raleigh

Maryknoll Society

Cause for Canonization


Raleigh Seminarian
who could use a Miracle.


Blessed Giuseppe Maria Segura Penadés, September 11

September 11, 2009

Blessed Giuseppe Maria Segura Penadés

Blessed Giuseppe Maria Segura Penadés, Priest and Martyr
September 11

Roman Martyrology: In the village of the Genoese in the territory of Valencia, Spain, Blessed Giuseppe Maria Segura Penadés, Priest and Martyr whose blood was shed blood in the same persecution as Christ.

Beatified as one of 233 Spanish Matryrs of Valencia by Pope John Paul on March 11, 2001, he is part of the subgroup known as Jose Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Sebastian Kimura, September 10

September 10, 2009

Blessed Sebastian Kimura

Blessed Sebastian Kimura, First Japanese Priest, Martyr
Firando, Japan, 1565 – Nagasaki, Japan, September 10, 1622

Roman Martyrology: At Nagasaki, Japan, blessed Sebastian Kimura, Jesuit, Francisco Morales, of the Order of Preachers, priests, and fifty companions, martyrs, priests, religious, married couples, youth, catechists, widows and children, Christ died on a hill in front of a large crowd of cruel torture.

In the long history of the evangelization of Japan, there were two periods of terrible persecution against Christians and foreign missionaries in Japan.

The first began December 9, 1596 by the ‘shogun’ Hideyoshi and led to the martyrdom of the first 26 Catholics, including three Japanese Jesuits and six Franciscans, crucified and pierced February 5, 1597, in the area of Nagasaki on the ‘holy hill’ these martyrs were proclaimed saints by Pope Pius IX in 1862.

The second prosecution after a useful period of peace which saw the arrival of other missionaries, not only the Jesuits and Franciscans, Dominicans and Augustinians as well, was unleashed by the ‘shogun’ Ieyasu, in 1614 and its successors until 1632; a furious carnage that struck missionaries, catechists, lay people of every social condition, even children and entire families killed in the style of Eastern and refined among various tortures.

Most of the martyrs, who were thousands, died tied to a stake and burned over a slow fire, so that the ‘holy hill’ of Nagasaki, which experienced the first persecution, was eerily illuminated by rows of torches for several evenings and nights; other martyrs were beheaded or chopped to pieces. In this second, longer and more numerous persecution, collecting evidence, the Church was able to recognize among the many thousands of victims, the historical validity of martyrdom for at least 205 of them, that Pope Pius IX, July 7, 1867 proclaimed Blessed.

Among them is one blessed Kimura, descendant of the first newcomer to be educated and baptized in Hirado s. Francis Xavier and a relative of two other Japanese martyrs, Kimura (Leonardo) and Kimura (Antonio) who will become blessed as well.

Kimura was born in Firando in 1565 into a family converted to Catholicism, at Baptism, he was also given the Christian name of Sebastian. For 11 years, he devoted himself to the service of the Jesuit church in the city of Firando, then passed to Bungo in the seminary of the Jesuit fathers, aged 19 and got asked to join the Order of St. Ignatius. Seminarian said the catechism Meace and the district of the monkey, then moved to the College of Macao to China to study theology. In September 1601, he returned to Japan, and was ordained a priest in Nagasaki, the first of the Japanese nation.

The second raging fierce persecution against Christians, Father Kimura (Sebastian), who was gifted with remarkable eloquence, was skilled at disguise and transform, to evade the spies, in the most diverse characters, as a soldier, merchant, farmer, carrier, doctor. This allowed him to penetrate even the most dangerous places in prisons to comfort the future martyrs.

Learning that he was wanted, the father provincial of the Jesuits urged him to leave Nagasaki as soon as possible, but it was too late, June 30, 1621, betrayed by a Korean slave, Father Kimura was arrested while he was staying at the home of Anthony, a Korean Catholic, taken with him were also his catechists and Suzuta, locked up in prison, where they were prisoners for four years, Father Charles Spinola (1564-1622) and four novices.

The conditions of the prisoners were terrible, the prison was on a mountain top, cold and exposed to the winds, and they were given a single blanket, some food; rice and two sardines, just enough to keep them alive but without satisfying their hunger.

The hygienic conditions were miserable, unable to wash a cloth and dry them without a bit ‘n the sun, the time spent in this terrible prison, saw them engaged in prayer, penance and fervent spiritual talks.

At last September 9, 1622, orders came to transfer the prisoners to Nagasaki, Father Kimura, Father Spinola and 22 others, novices and faithful Catholics, now sentenced to death by the governor Gourocu were combined with others from local jails and transported on boats to Nagaic and from there on mules up above the hills above Nagasaki, where the stakes were ready and the wood to be burned alive.

The torment of the stake fell to 22 of them, while 30 others were beheaded, it was September 10, 1622, Father Kimura, and Father Charles Spinola were among those burned at the stake, to make longer torment the wood shed had been put off circle.

The barbaric execution, which lasted three hours, was witnessed by a huge crowd scattered on the mountain and on boats at sea, Father Sebastian Kimura, First Priest of Japan, died last, after being motionless for three hours, and tied with his arms crossed, until the fire reached him.

His liturgical feast is on September 10.

Author: Antonio Borrelli

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed James Desire Laval, September 9

September 9, 2009

Blessed James Desire Laval

Blessed James Desire Laval Priest
Croth (Evreux), Normandy, September 18, 1803 – Port-Louis, Mauritius, September 9, 1864

He was born in France in 1803 to a middle-class family that pushed him to graduate in medicine. Escaping from an accident, he decided to leave the medical profession to become a missionary. Sent in 1841 on the island of Mauritius, he enthusiastically devoted himself to the evangelization of the Blacks who had been legally freed from slavery, but left to themselves. His “chosen field” caused serious conflicts with other missionaries and even with the bishop, who wanted to devote himself only to the children of white settlers. His “incarnation” in the world of “negritude” led him to value all the positive elements of local culture not, only religious, but also the indigenous. James Laval was beatified by Pope John Paul II, who stressed the fact that he had placed “on one side, the side of the last, the Blacks in a time of racism.” Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski, September 8

September 8, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Bladzinski, Priest and Martyr
My_latycze, Ukraine, January 6, 1908 – Gross-Rosen, Germany, September 8, 1944


Blessed Wladyslaw Bladzinski, priest of the Congregation of St. Michael the Archangel, was born in My_latycze, Ukraine, January 6, 1908 and died at Gross-Rosen, Germany, September 8, 1944. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In Gross-Rosen locations in Germany, Bladzinski Blessed Ladislaus, a priest of the Congregation of St. Michael and martyr, at the same time the enemies of the Church deported from his native Poland in a stone quarry, where he was later killed.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. Stephen Pongracz, September 7

September 7, 2009

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice, Jesuit and Martyr
Alvincz, Romania, around 1582 – Kosice, Slovakia, September 7, 1619

Roman Martyrology: In the Carpathian mountains, in Košice, Slovakia today, holy martyr Stephen Pongracz, priest of the Society of Jesus, could not be lead to deny their Catholic faith by hunger, nor the torture of the wheel and fire.

Scion of the Hungarian nobility, he was born in 1582 in the castle Alvincz in Transylvania. After classical studies in his native land and in the Jesuit College in Cluj (Romania today) he entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus in Brno, in 1602. Then he continued his studies in philosophy and theology in Prague to Graz Read the rest of this entry »


Father Darin Didier, September 6

September 6, 2009

DarinDidier

Father Darin J. Didier
September 27, 1972, in St. Paul, MN-September 6, 2005, Fargo, ND

Obituary

Miracles.

More info.


Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, September 1

September 1, 2009

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, Priest and Martyr

Villacreces, Spain, September 3, 1912 – Barcelona, Spain, late August / early September 1936

He is remembered on September 1


Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, Martyr Pedro Rivera, a priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, Maria Carmela Moreno Benítez and Maria del Rifugio Carbonell Muñoz, Institute of virgin Mary Help of Christians, who in the same persecution, complied with the Passion of Christ the Bridegroom, came to the reward of eternal peace.

Candido Rivera Rivera was born September 3, 1912 at Villacreces in the Spanish diocese of Leon. Entering the Order of Friars Minor Conventual with the name of Pedro, he made his novitiate in Granollers and he made his temporary vows in 1928. Posted in Italy to attend his theological studies in Osimo, he made his solemn vows in Rome in 1933, while in 1935 he obtained a licentiate in theology and was ordained a priest.

“ He then returned home and, despite his young age, he was appointed superior of the community of Granollers, in recognition of his moral qualities, spiritual and cultural. He always showed genuine disciple of St. Francis, full of love for the consecrated life, excellent higher education, humble and kind to the brethren, a man of peace, particularly pious and devout to the Blessed Sacrament and the Virgin Mary.

“ At the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Father Pedro was expelled from the monastery with his fellow revolutionaries and sought refuge with some family friends. However, he was discovered and arrested on July 25, 1936. So he just had to prepare for the imminent martyrdom confessing to the priest of Llinas, who confided: “If I have the grace to be killed, die shouting ‘Long live Christ the King.” Two days later he was released and went to Barcelona, but was arrested again August 22. Probably between late August and early September 1936 he was shot. Everyone immediately considered him a martyr of the faith.

“ Pedro Rivera Rivera and her fis brothers belonging to the Order of Friars Minor Conventual were Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II with a group made a total of no less than 233 martyrs of that persecution.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Vincenzo Mattia Cabanes Badenas, August 30

August 30, 2009

Blessed Vincenzo Mattia Cabanes Badenas,Priest and Martyr
February 25 1908, in Torrent (Valencia), Spain-September 29, 1936,
Torrent (Valencia), Spain

He is remembered on August 30

Roman Martyrology: In Bilbao also in Spain, blessed Cabanes Badenas Vincent, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of the hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who, during the same persecution against the faith, deserved to be admitted to the eternal banquet.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of Our Spanish Tertiary Capuchin, 19 Spanish members of the Congregation of Our Lady of Sorrows Capuchin Tertiary (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigo y Rerrer, and a sister, also a Capuchin Tertiary, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), a sub-group of the 233 victims of the Spanish Civil War Beatified by Pope John Paul on March 11, 2001 .

“ Badenas Cabanes, Vincenzo, eldest of four siblings, was born February 25 1908, in Torrent (Valencia). He had pronounced his religious vows and completed sludi philosophical and theological, March 12, 1932 he was ordained a priest in Madrid. In the set. “ 1933 was rated top of the reformatory of the Prince of Asturias, in Madrid, and optics. the following year he went on to head the Cabinet of psycho-pedagogy of the reformatory Amurrio (Alava), where he was surprised the civil war broke out July 18, 1936.

On the evening of September 27 the same year, militants arrested him in the house where he had fled. During the ride to Orduna (Vizcaya) demanded that the murderers to deny the German, but he opposed proudly displaying the crucifix. Once in Orduna did get in a ditch near the Prado de San Bartolomé where they shot him with several gunshots. Abandoned and badly wounded, managed to crawl to the first houses in the country, where the family Elejalde Arroyo welcomed him: the priest asked for a doctor and a priest. During the night, still clutching the crucifix, he was transferred to the hospital of Basurto (Bilbao). When asked to explain what had happened, he replied: “Do not ask me these things, I speak only of God Let us pray, the pardon of those who have wounded heart,” and did not reveal the names of those who had sho himt. Died September 29, 1936, after two days of great suffering. His remains rest in the ‘chapel of the martyrs, “the convent of Mount Sion in Torrent (Valencia).

“ The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the archidioccsi of Valencia together with seven other cases relating to as many cases of the martyrdom of members of different religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these causes, May 13 1997 the Positio super martyrdom was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, August 29

August 29, 2009

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Híjar, Spain, March 29, 1912 – August 29, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Híjar always at Teruel in Spain, blessed Francis Monzón Romeo, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who in the same persecution confirmed with blood for his fidelity to the Lord.

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon on March 11, 2001, one of 233 Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Beatified that day by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), August 28

August 28, 2009

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample)

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), Priest and Martyr
February 3, 1896, Viñales (Valencia), Spain-
August 28, 1938, Viñales (Valencia), Spain

Roman Martyrology: Near the village of Viñales still in the same area, blessed Aurelio (Joseph) Ample Alcaide, Order of Friars Minor Capuchin Priest and Martyr, who, during the same period in the battle for the faith brought the glorious prize.

Was born February 3, 1896 in Viñales (Valencia), third of seven children who were spouses D. Ample and Donna Manuela Vicente Alcaide. He was baptized the day after birth, ie February 4, in the parish of San Honorato bishop, and received Confirmation April 21, 1899.

“ He first studied the Seraphic Seminary of Massamagrell (Valencia). Wore the Capuchin habit in 1912, he made his temporary profession of vows on, August 10, 1913 and perpetual December 18, 1917. He was then sent to Rome to perfect himself in his studies and was ordained a priest in the Eternal City March 26, 1921 by the Archbishop of Filipos, Bishop Joseph Palica. Back in Spain, he was appointed director of the student of philosophy and theology of the Capuchins in Orihuela (Alicante), office held, and overall satisfaction with care until death.

“ “Among the faithful he enjoyed the reputation of a saint – said the priest Worker Diocesan D. Pascual Ortells – and that fame also joined the test. Was faithful observant of all the rules of St. Francis, commit itself to helping its total so that young men were perfect. “

“ During the Revolution of 1936 all the religious of the convent of Orihuela dispersed on July 13. P. Aurelio sought refuge in the family home in Viñales, in which, on 28 August, was captured by gunmen and taken to his place of death. Before being killed he urged all his comrades to die well, gave them absolution, and then added, “Cry aloud, live Christ the King.”

“ He was killed August 28, 1936. His body was interred in the cemetery of Foyos (Valencia), near where he had been killed. After the civil war, his remains were exhumed and carried into the cemetery Vinalesa September 17, 1937. He is currently buried in the chapel of the convent of the Capuchin martyrs Maddalena Massamagrell.

“ P. Aurelio retain the use within, since he was captured until death, all remaining faithful to Christ. “He kept the peace until the last moment – he says Rafael Rodrigo, the witness of his martyrdom – encouraging all of us that we were going to die. When everything was ready for execution, urges us to recite the formula of the act of contrition. So we did, and when the Servant of God was reciting the formula of a militiaman gave him two slaps. One of the militiamen said to his companion not to slap him more, because it was not worth the trouble, given the time of life we have left. The Servant of God remained unchanged and continued to injury before the acquittal until the end. As soon as the Servant of God had finished his sacred duty, a volley rang out and we fell with him all repeating the cry: ‘Long live Christ the King!’.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Spanish Capuchins, Martyrs of Valencia, 12 friars and 5 Poor Clares, who suffered martyrdom during the civil war and religious persecution that through their homeland in the 30s of the twentieth century. Pope John Paul II Beatified them on March 11, 2001, together with a group totaling 233 martyrs of the same persecution.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, August 27

August 27, 2009

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, Priest and Martyr
August 27

Roman Martyrology: Along the road between the towns of Godella Bétera and in the same region in Spain, blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, priest and martyr who shed their blood for Christ during the same persecution against the faith.On March 11, 2001, Pope John Paul II Beatified in St. Peter’s Square in Rome 233 Spanish martyrs, including the thickest cloud of witnesses of faith elevated to the glory of the altars in the course of his pontificate.

“ These numerous innocent lambs of the cause of Christ were killed out of hatred for their faith during the brutal religious persecution that characterized the Spanish Civil War in the 30s of the twentieth century. In this bloody massacre that through Spain, the number of victims over a million, affecting people of all ages and social class: bishops, priests, religious and laity of both sexes. It was well established by historians that, within this terrible massacre, anarchists and socialists-communists perpetrated a real persecution aimed at destroying the Catholic Church in Spain.

The martyrs were divided into smaller groups, based on their Archdiocese. Blessed Raimondo is part of the group known as José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia who were Decreed on Martyrs on December 18, 2000

Source:  Santi e Beati


State investigation of Fr. Tim Vakoc’s death finds negligence by nursing home staff

August 26, 2009

Fr. Tim VakocFr. Tim Vakoc

2 nursing assistants blamed for priest’s fall

Report: They gave “incongruous” explanations of an accident that led to the Army chaplain’s death.

By MAURA LERNER, 2 nursing assistants blamed for priest’s fall

Report: They gave “incongruous” explanations of an accident that led to the Army chaplain’s death.

By MAURA LERNER, Star Tribune

A state investigation has found that two nursing assistants were responsible for the June accident that led to the death of the Rev. Tim Vakoc, a Roman Catholic priest and Army chaplain, at St. Therese nursing home in New Hope.

The two staffers, who were not identified, were attempting to transfer the paralyzed priest from his wheelchair to his bed when he fell to the floor and injured his head on June 20, according to the report, released Tuesday by the state Office of Health Facility Complaints.

This is the first detailed report of what happened to Vakoc, 49, who died that same day after he was rushed to a hospital. Vakoc, who was widely known as Father Tim, had needed round-the-clock care ever since a devastating head injury in 2004 from a roadside bomb in Iraq. Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Melchizedek, August 26

August 26, 2009

Melchizedeck

Saint Melchizedek, King of Salem and Priest

August 26, Second Millennium BC


“Melchizedek, king of Salem and priest of God Most High” is mentioned twice in the Old Testament. He met Abraham, offered him bread and wine and blessed him. In return, Abraham gave him a tithe of the booty recently conquered (Gen 14:18-20). When Jerusalem became the capital of the Kingdom of Israel, King David was proclaimed “a priest forever after the manner of Melchizedek” (Ps. 110.4). This allusion to another priesthood, different from the Levite, was used in Hebrews: Christ is a priest not of carnal descent, but “the manner of Melchizedek” (Hebrews 6:20). The Christian tradition saw in Melchizedek a prophecy of Christ and the offering of bread and wine the prophecy of the Eucharist.

Etymology: = Melchizedek the King, that God is justice
Emblem: Bread and wine
Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, August 25

August 25, 2009

Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa

Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Zaragoza, Spain, June 3, 1882 – Valencia, Spain, August 25, 1936.

Roman Martyrology: At Valencia in Spain, Blessed Luigi Urban Lanaspa, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who faced trial for the glorious Christ.

He was Beatified by Pope John Paul on March 11, 2001, together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War as part of the group known as Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, August 24

August 24, 2009

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr
Gmina Żarnowiec, Poland, February 21, 1908 – Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942

Blessed Maksymilian Binkiewicz, Polish diocesan priest, was born in Gmina Żarnowiec (Olkusz) February 21, 1908 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 together with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp at Dachau near Munich in Germany, Monaco, blessed Maximian Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr, who, during the war, was deported by the invading soldiers from Poland because of his faith in Christ and he died under torture and torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Findysz, August 23

August 23, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Findysz2

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Findysz, Priest and Martyr
Kroscienko Nizne, Poland, December 13, 1907 – Zmigrod Nowy, Poland, August 21, 1964


Born in Kroscienko Nizne near Krosno (Poland) on December 13, 1907. Ordained a priest June 19, 1932 in Przemysl. In 1942 he was appointed parish priest in Nowy Żmigród. During and after the Second World War, he was generously devoted to spiritual and material aid of all the inhabitants of his parish, regardless of their nationality or confession.

In the years of Vatican Council II, he began the pastoral work of “works council of goodness,” from the pulpit and through letters-appeals calls for a renewal of Christian life. The communist authorities reacted to his zealous pastoral work with numerous persecutions. On December 17, 1963, he was sentenced to two years and six months in jail accused of “forcing the faithful to religious practices.” In the prison he was subjected to mistreatment and humiliation, physical, mental and spiritual. Authorities with premeditation did not allow him to receive cancer surgery previously planned. He was conditionally released from prison in a state of extreme exhaustion. He died a few months later, on August 21, 1964.

Cardinal Jozef Glemp Beatified him on June 19, 2005, by reading the Apostolic Letter of Pope Benedict XVI.

Emblem: Palma

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, August 21

August 21, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, Priest and Martyr
August 21

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 others from the Archdiocese of Valencia who were victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Alberic on the territory of Valencia in Spain, blessed Savior Estrugo solves, priest and martyr, who, during the persecution endured for the love of Christ every hardship to obtain the palm of victory.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski, August 20

August 20, 2009

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski

Blessed Ladislaus (Wladyslaw) Maczkowski, Priest and Martyr
Ociaz, Poland, June 24, 1911 – Dachau, Germany, August 20, 1942

Wladyslaw Maczkowski, priest of the Archdiocese of Gniezno, fell victim of the Nazis in the famous German concentration camp at Dachau. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar together with 107 other victims of that persecution.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria in Germany, Blessed Ladislaus Mączkowski, priest and martyr, who, of Polish origin, was deported during the war and to the persecutors of human dignity and defense of Christianity among the torture his faith until death.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

August 19, 2009

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Gerona, Spain, March 21, 1866 – Gandia, Spain, August 19, 1936

Father Tomás Sitjar Forti, professed Priest of the Society of Jesus, was born in the city of Gerona and joined the Society in 1880. He was Rector of the Novitiate and Superior of the Residence of Gandía. He was assassinated in Gandía Bianca Cruz at August 19, 1936 at the age of 70 years.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the city of Gandía in the same territory, Blessed Thomas Sitjar Forti, a priest of the Society of Jesus and Martyr, who scattered in the same persecution for Christ his blood.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Mirone of Cizici, August 17

August 17, 2009

Saint Mirone of Cizici, Priest and Martyr
August 17
m. Cizici, 250

Saint Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who according to legend was beheaded after many torments at Cizici nell’Ellesponto under the governor Antipatro and the reigning emperor Decius.

Roman Martyrology: At Cizici in Ellesponto, in modern Turkey, St. Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who, as we passed, was beheaded after many torments under the Emperor Decius and the governor Antipatro.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya, August 15

August 15, 2009

Blessed Domenico Maria da AlborayaBlessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya (Augustine Hurtado Soler), Priest and Martyr

Alboraya (Valencia) on 28 Aug, 1872-August 15

Ordained a priest on Dec. 19, 1896. An experienced teacher, working and cartatevole, had positions of responsibility in his institute. A man of prayer and great devotee of Our Lady of Sorrows, he celebrated the Eucharist with devotion

Roman Martyrology: Always in Madrid, Blessed Domenico (Augustine) Soler Hurtado, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who had witnessed Christ, received the crown of glory.

Beatified together with a group known as the Blessed Martyrs Third Spanish Capuchins dell’Addolorata, he was one of 19 religious Spaniards belonging to the Congregation of the Third Capuchins of Our Lady of Sorrows (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigó y Rerrer, and a sister, also Tertiary Cappuccina, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39).

The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the Valencia archidiocese together with seven other cases relating to the martyrdom of so many cases of members of various religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these cases, on 13 May. 1997 the Positio super martyria was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney, August 14

August 14, 2009

Venerable Father McGivney

Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney

Founder of Knights of Columbus, together with 24 lay members

August 12, 1852, Waterbury, CT-August 14, 1890, New Haven, CT

Cause for Canonization

In this Year for Priests, a reminder that, whether they’re recognized as such after death, many of our parish priests are saints, though I suspect founding the Knights of Columbus may be a factor in this priest’s cause.

Parish Priests, Too, May Become Saints, from Catholicity

by Fr. Roger J. Landry – March 28, 2008

Though in our lifetimes, probably all of us have gotten to know some very holy priests, no native born American priest has ever been formally declared a saint. Moreover, in the history of the Church, no matter what the country, it’s very rare for a parish priest to be canonized— unless he went on to become a saintly bishop or founded a new religious order. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Mauritius Tornay, August 11

August 11, 2009

Blessed Maurizio Tornay

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, Priest and Martyr

Rosière, Switzerland, August 31, 1910 – To Thong, Tibet, August 11, 1949

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, professed priest of the Order of Canons Regular of St. Augustine of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bemardo “Montis Iovis”, was born in Rosière (Joint Orsières – canton of Valais), Switzerland, August 31, 1910 and died a martyr at To Thong, Tibet, on August 11, 1949. His tomb is located at the Mission Yerkalo, Tibet-China. He was beatified in Rome by Pope John Paul II on May 16, 1993.

Roman Martyrology: In the region of Tibet, Blessed Mauritius Tornay, Priest and Martyr who, canon regular of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bernard of Mont Joux-announced engagement with the Gospel in China and Tibet and was killed by the enemies of Christ. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed German of Carcaixent, August 9

August 9, 2009

Blessed German of Cartaxeint

Blessed German of Carcaixent (José Maria Hernandez Garrigues) Capuchin Priest and Martyr
Carcaixent, Valencia, Spain, February 12, 1895 – 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Carcaixent in Valencia in Spain, Blessed Germanus ( José Maria) Garrigues Hernández, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who, during persecution against the faith, won the tortures of body with precious death.

Father was born in Germán Carcagente (Valencia), in the bosom of a Christian family, February 12, 1895. He was baptized on his day of birth in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Carcagente Confirmation was received on July 22, 1912 by Bishop Athanasius Fr. Royo Soler, duly authorized by the archbishop of the diocese. In the family of D. Juan Bautista and Donna Garrigues Ana María Hernández were born eight children, three of whom became like our Capuchin, José Maria. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, August 8

August 8, 2009

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, Priest and Martyr
Rogoznica, Poland, January 30, 1886 – Gusen, Austria, August 8, 1940

Wlodzimierz Laskowski, a priest of the Archdiocese of Poznan, fell victim of the Nazis in their hatred of the Christian faith. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution. While they were beatified together, their deaths took place separately so there is not a collective memorial.

Roman Martyrology: At Gusen Germany blessed Vladimiro Laskowski, priest and martyr, who, in times of war, was deported for his faith in this prison camp and, cruelly tortured, reached the glory of martyrdom.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Gaetano Thiene, August 7

August 7, 2009

Saint Gaetano ThieneSaint Gaetano Thiene, Priest

Vicenza, October 1480 – Naples, August 7, 1547
Born in Vicenza to the noble family of Thiene in 1480, and baptized with the name of Gaetano, in memory of his famous uncle, who was called so because he was born in Gaeta.  Protontario apostolic of Julius II, left Leo X in the papal court maturing, especially nell’Oratorio of Divine Love, the joint experience of prayer and service to the poor and the excluded. And restoration of the priesthood and religious life, inspired by the Sermon on the Mount and the model of the apostolic Church. Devotee of the crib and passion of the lord, he founded (1524) with Gian Pietro Carafa, bishop of Chieti (Teate), then Paul IV (1555-1559), the Clerics Regular Teatini. For his unlimited trust in God is revered as the saint of providence.

Roman Martyrology: Saint Gaetano da Thiene, a priest who dedicated himself to Naples at the foot works of charity, in particular striving for the sick incurable sponsored associations for the religious formation of the laity and the Clerics Regular instituted for the renewal of the Church, calling for His disciples the duty to observe the ancient lifestyle of the Apostles.

Source: Santi e Beati

Blessed Matteo da Bascio, August 6

August 6, 2009

Blessed Matteo da Bascia

Blessed Matteo da Bascio, founder of the Capuchins
Pennabilli, Pesaro-Urbino, circa 1495 – Venezia, August 6, 1552

Born in the village of Bascio, today in the town of Pennabilli (PU), he became a Franciscan of the Observant branch of the convent of Montefiorentino at Frontino (PU) and was ordained a priest in 1525. Desiring to return to the primitive rigor of Franciscan life, in 1525 he left his monastery and was granted by Pope Clement VII the personal privilege of dressing in a long tunic of rough cloth (such as Francis of Assisi, but with a longer hood and sharp) to observe strictly the rule of absolute poverty, to make a hermitic life and to preach freely. His example gave rise to a number of imitators who began restoring the original spirit of the Franciscan way home and had the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, which thanks to the support of Katherine duchess of Camerino Cybo was approved by the pope on July 3, 1528 with the Bull religionis zelus. In the first general chapter of the order, held in April 1529 in the church of Santa Maria di dell’Acquarella Albacina at Fabriano, Matthew was elected first superior general. Bright omileta, he took part in the great reform movement of the religious life of the sixteenth century. He died in Venice, in the church of San Moisè and buried in the church of San Francesco della Vigna.

Source: Santi e Beati


St. John Mary Vianney, August 4, the 150th Anniversary of his Passing

August 4, 2009

Saint John VianneySt John Vianney

Dardilly, near Lyons, France, May 8, 1786-Ars, 4 August, 1859

Please note that today is one of the days in which the faithful may potentially earn a plenary indulgence .

In 1806, the curé at Ecully, M. Balley, opened a school for ecclesiastical students, and Jean-Marie was sent to him. Though he was of average intelligence and his masters never seem to have doubted his vocation, his knowledge was extremely limited, being confined to a little arithmetic, history, and geography, and he found learning, especially the study of Latin, excessively difficult. One of his fellow-students, Matthias Loras, afterwards first Bishop of Dubuque, assisted him with his Latin lessons. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, August 3

August 3, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis SeguiBlessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr,Third Spanish Capuchins
August 3

Roman Martyrology: At Alicante in Spain, followed blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr, who spilled the blood of Christ during the persecution against the faith and obtained the palm of victory.

Pope John Paul II Beatified him on March 11, 2001 in St. Peter’s Square, together wtih 232 other victims of the bloody Spanish Civil War. This wide range of martyrs is divided into several subgroups according to the diocese or congregation to which they belong. The Romanum Martyrologium commemorates those blessed individually or in small groups based on the date and place of where the slaughter occurred.

Blessed Salvatore is part of the subgroup José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati