7 YEARS LATER: Eye Opening Article: “Disorder among the Orders”

April 21, 2015

Eye Opening Article: “Disorder among the Orders”

In 2008 I am wondering:

  • What became of the dissident orders listed below?
  • How has the model of the “sister who lives in an apartment alone and drinks beer on tap at the local watering hole” worked out?  Have folks like that stuck with the orders as the much older members needed care in nursing homes and the motherhouses got consolidated or sold?
  • What became of all the motherhouses?  We are just a few years away from a massive sell off of motherhouses that are the last homes to communities that no longer need them for formation.  For a number of them, they can’t today and most certainly won’t be able to use them in the next 10 years for existing members….  The combination of size, expense and unsuitability of a lot of these locations as nursing homes… And that is where the majority of today’s women religous who belong to the “Leadership Conference of Women Religious” will be – if they are still in this vale of tears – in the next 10-20 years.  Longevity for women who failed to have spiritual daughters will not prove to be a picnic.
  • Conversely, how are the Domincians in Nashville doing?  Ann Arbor?  What about in New Jersey?  How are the women of the Franciscans of the Eternal Word faring?  Are they in need of downsizing today?  Have they been forced into selling motherhouses for lack of bodies to fill them?
  • A recent study of 142 new or emerging communities of consecrated life by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University concluded that “the Catholic Church in the United States may be on the threshold of another cycle of rebirth in consecrated life — new groups of Catholics committed to a shared spirituality and the evangelical counsels [vows of poverty, chastity and obedience] that will address the changing times, concerns and needs in new and creative ways.”” – How did that play out?
  • What happened to the Basilian Sisters of Saint Basil the Great in Union Town?  Are they still at the motherhouse?
  • What happened to the Holy Cross Sisters at Notre Dame?

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Monday, April 21, 2008

SOURCE: http://romancatholicvocations.blogspot.com/2008/04/eye-opening-article-disorder-among.html

Eye Opening Article: “Disorder among the Orders”

From Our Sunday Visitor

By Ann Carey
Emphases and (comments) mine – BW
With vocations shrinking and financial problems looming large, some women Religious find themselves at a crossroads
When leaders of Religious orders met with Pope Benedict XVI earlier this year, he praised and encouraged them, but also expressed concern that many orders are in crisis, with shrinking numbers, confusion over their role and identity, and even disagreement with Church teaching.

Speaking to a group of superiors general, Pope Benedict said that many orders are experiencing “a difficult crisis due to the aging of members, a more or less accentuated fall in vocations and, sometimes, a spiritual and charismatic weariness.”

Three days later, the pope met with leaders of the Jesuits and reminded them of their fundamental duty of “keeping the harmony with the magisterium, which avoids creating confusion and bewilderment among the people of God.”

It may seem strange to Catholics in the pews that Pope Benedict felt compelled to remind superiors that many Religious orders are in disarray and that they should be in harmony with the magisterium. After all, canon law says that sisters, brothers and priests in Religious orders are to be “totally dedicated to God” and to “the upbuilding of the Church.”

Yet, the pope was voicing the obvious: Many Religious orders that thrived for a century or more have given up their traditional work and common life and are struggling to decide who they are and how they relate to the Church.

Furthermore, many of the most outspoken Church dissidents are members of Religious orders, a fact that naturally raises this question: “How can one remain a member of a Religious order while at the same time rejecting Church teaching?”

While Religious orders of both men and women are struggling today, the men’s orders have remained more stable, probably because about three-quarters of the approximately 19,000 men Religious are priests, an identity that grounds them.

The crisis is more pronounced among women’s orders, which have about 65,000 members. What follows is a closer look at the current concerns about Religious orders via a focus on women Religious.

These include a loss of identity, shrinking vocations, retirement worries and at-risk property. Some of the sisters interviewed for this article asked not to be named out of concern for repercussions from their orders.

Some orders have lost a sense of themselves

Before the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), Religious sisters almost always lived in convents, where they shared Eucharist and common prayer with other sisters. They worked in their orders’ institutions in jobs like teachers, nurses, retreat leaders, counselors and administrators, and carried out their work in communion with the Church. They also understood their identity as vowed, consecrated persons dedicated to Jesus Christ and his Church — a role clearly defined by the Church.

When Vatican II documents directed Religious orders to update obsolete practices and to examine their lives and ministry according to their founders’ vision, confusion reigned in many orders. Some orders did manage to renew their practices — perhaps 10 percent to 20 percent of women’s orders — while maintaining their identity as consecrated Religious.

Pope Benedict alluded to those renewed orders in his remarks to superiors, saying they are a positive sign, “especially when communities have chosen to return to the origins and live in a way more in keeping with the spirit of the founder.”

However, many orders of women Religious went far beyond the mandates of Vatican II, even blurring the distinction between their vowed members and lay “associate members.” These orders have been outspoken in their efforts to “transform,” bring “systemic change” and “re-image” Religious life and Read the rest of this entry »


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Society of Saint Vincent Ferrier

November 25, 2009

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NOTE TO READERS: If you have any suggestions for orders or communities you feel should be highlighted for TCB’s “Vocations Tuesday” please Contact us! @ ASimpleSinner@gmail.com! Include “VOCATIONS TUESDAY” in the subject line please!


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Institute Of Christ The King

May 12, 2009

Institute of Christ the King

 
The Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest is a society of priests in the Catholic Church that celebrates the liturgy in Latin in accordance with its constitutions and founding documents based on permissions granted by Rome. The Institute also preserves and patronizes traditional Latin Rite liturgical art and music and has undertaken the restoration and beautification of several churches. The Institute is a Society of Apostolic Life, whose rule of life is based generally on that of the secular canons. The Institute has its own choir dress adopted in 2006 and solemnly given to members by the Cardinal Archbishop of Florence. The Institute Read the rest of this entry »

VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Children Of Mary

December 23, 2008

 

The Children of Mary is a semi-contemplative community of Sisters forming in the diocese of Columbus (Ohio) under the guidance of Bishop Frederick Campbell. The Sisters spend time each day in humble adoration of Our Eucharistic King. We chant the Liturgy of the Hours (in English) and attend daily Mass. We serve our neighbor by praying and sacrificing for all of our brothers and sisters throughout the world, begging God to give grace to all to come to love and adore Him in the Most Holy Eucharist. Living simply and prayerfully, we seek ever deeper union with God. Each Sister spends part of each day in community prayer, work, recreation, adoration, and solitude, alone with God, in order to make ourselves available to God for the gift of contemplation, which deepens our love and increases our virtue. After preparation, each Sister consecrates her life to the Sacred Heart of Jesus through the Immaculate Heart of Mary and makes an act of abandonment to God’s loving, divine Providence.

The Sisters study the Faith so as to grow in love and appreciation for the gift of Faith, and also in order to be able to share the Faith with those who come in search of truth. Gently, humbly, we wish to share with everyone the beauty of the Catholic Faith and the astounding reality that God is with us in the Holy Eucharist. We pray for a greater awareness and appreciation of God’s Presence with us in the Holy Eucharist so that the natural consequences of such understanding – reverence and adoration, will blossom throughout the world.

SEE: http://www.childrenofmary.net/

Children of Mary
8353 Pleasant Chapel Road
Newark, Ohio 43056 USA

Phone: 740-323-1977

E-mail: childrenofmary@juno.com


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Third Order Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate

December 9, 2008

The Third Order Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate is an offshoot of the Franciscans Tertiaries of the Immaculate founded by Fr. Stefano Manelli, FI. They are totally dedicated to Our Lady sealed by the Marian vow of total consecration to the Immaculate, after the recent example of St. Maximilian Kolbe. They live a penitential life of prayer in community; have made private vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

 

Starting the day with Morning Prayer, the Sisters go out to work in a variety of church related occupations centered in the parish. They also make and sell rosaries, rosary bracelets, and a variety of craft items to help support the FI missions. Spiritually united with the other Sisters, each sister prays the Angelus, Rosary, Chaplet of Divine Mercy and other community prayers. Living a life of love and joy in the Immaculate, the Sisters seek to make Our lady known and loved and to bring all to Christ through the Immaculate. Coming together for meals, the Sisters are spiritually renewed with readings from a variety of pious works.

The Sisters live in community, wear a traditional habit, and are in total conformity with the church magisterium. Under the guidance of the FI priests, the Sisters share the same charism and spirituality as the FI missionary friars and Sisters, and also evangelize through mission appeals to support the FI missions. The formation program consists of aspirancy, postulancy, novitiate, and profession. The Sisters accept candidates beginning with the age of 18, as well as delayed vocations. They have one retreat Sunday a month, make a variety of novenas during the year, pray the Stations of the Cross, Franciscan crown and have choir practice as well as other spiritual exercises throughout the month.

After coming together for evening prayer, the Sisters enjoy each other’s company at recreation. Closing the day with night prayers, the Sisters retire after singing a hymn to Our Lady enclosing themselves under her mantle with the knowledge that they have brought joy and solace to mission lands through their prayer and support of Our Lady’s missionaries.

If you are interested of knowing more about these sisters, please write or contact:

Franciscan Tertiary Sisters of the Immaculate
E-Mail: maryqueenofapostles@cox.net
Telephone (401) 725-8417

SOURCE: http://www.marymediatrix.com/religious-life/franciscan-tertiary-sisters-of-the-immaculate/

NOTE TO READERS: If you have any suggestions for orders or communities you feel should be highlighted for TCB’s “Vocations Tuesday” please Contact us! @ ASimpleSinner@gmail.com!

 


Happy 20th Anniversary, Fraternity of Saint Peter (FSSP)

October 25, 2008

Today the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter celebrates the 20 anniversary of its canonical erection as a society of apostolic life of pontifical right by His Holiness of happy memory, Pope John Paul II. It began humbly with 11 priests and 1 deacon.

Today they are 300+ members strong with two packed seminaries – one in Austria and one in Nebraska.

Consider sending a birthday card with a $5 bill to:

The Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter
North American Headquarters
Griffin Rd, PO Box 196
Elmhurst, PA 18416

“Who would have thought that this small group of traditional, Latin rite priests would so quickly grow to over 300 members working and studying on 5 continents in the 17 different countries serving over 85 dioceses … and then become THE main force for the implementation of a papal decree expressly promoting the return of the traditional Latin Mass, now known as the “extraordinary form” of the Roman missal, as well as all the sacraments and devotions that go along with it?” (from: http://www.fssp.com/main/News071019.htm)


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Sisters of Mary, Mother of The Church

October 21, 2008

Sisters of Mary Mother Of The Church

Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Church
Immaculate Heart Retreat Center
6910 S. Ben Burr Road
Spokane, WA 99223

An amazing story of a group of sisters who were fully reconciled to the Catholic Church just this year. Keep them in your prayers and – if possible – consider offering them whatever support that you may.

Forty Years on the Mount
by Matthew T. Gamber, SJ

Last July, 15 nuns from a schismatic convent in Washington state rejoined the Catholic Church. They left the motherhouse of the Religious Congregation of Mary Immaculate Queen (CMRI), located on the outskirts of Spokane, to form a new congregation: the Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Church. They formally renounced their state of schism, made a profession of the Catholic faith, became a private association of the faithful under the care of Spokane Bishop William Skylstad, and recognized the legitimacy of the popes from Paul VI through Benedict XVI.

Their former order, which still has approximately 35 sisters, holds to the sedevacantist position that popes elected since John XXIII are invalid and that Vatican II was a heretical council.

The new order’s title reflects its pilgrimage to full communion with Rome. “Mary is our guide. With a title so ancient and yet so popular today, ‘Mother of the Church; she understands the need for unity in the Church,” explains Sister Mary Eucharista, one of the new sisters. “It may be that part of our mission is to help draw those into the Church who have been where we were. Who better to show us how to accomplish that than the Mother of the Church, to whom we give our loyalty and allegiance?”

While maintaining the full habit, the new Catholic sisters have Read the rest of this entry »