Proponents of Women’s Ordination just don’t get it!

September 3, 2009

Mantilla-twitch to Fr. Z who posted a request to weigh in on a survey about womens’ ordination. If the poll is still open, please vote no.

The Archbishop of Cincinnati has banned a nun from teaching in the Archdiocese.

Why?

She supports Women’s Ordination.

Problem?

Yes, indeed! Catholics are supposed to be Catholic. In addition to weekly Sunday Mass and regular Confession, Catholics are meant to adhere to church teaching.

That means all of it.

While there are a few things that I have some difficulty with, which is probably true with everyone, it’s one thing to have thoughts in my head. It’s another for others to know what they are. I’m not in a position to speak for, or to appear to be speaking for the Church; however, I don’t discuss those things with which I struggle. If I did? Pastor, Spiritual Director and Confessor are those with whom I may discuss these things. They’re not for public consumption.

If I worked for the church or volunteered with religious education, it would be a problem for me to allow my difficult areas to be known; public dissent would be inappropriate.

How much more inappropriate, then, is it for a professed religious to speak publicly against church teaching? A nun or religious sister has professed vows, usually including obedience; in addition to obeying church teaching, she must obey her superiors in her order. In turn, her order must obey the Bishop in whose territory it operates. That means that public dissent from church teaching is forbidden. If she is told to publicly recant, she must do so.

The nun in this story refuses. While she’s willing to remove her name from a webpage advocating for Women’s Ordination, she refuses Archbishop Pilarczyk’s requirement that she publicly recant. He, with good reason and with authority, properly bans her from teaching in his Archdiocese.

Her supporters bring up her 40 years of teaching, which is material only inasmuch as she has had 40 years to spread her dissent within the church. It’s no wonder that people are confused. The fact that she has taught for 40 years in no way relates to the fact that she is publicly advocating for something that is outside of church teaching. The Church is not a Democracy!

She says it’s about equality. It isn’t. It’s about wanting what you can’t have. If she thinks women’s ordination is that important, she should leave her order and join a church that ordains women.

The Church is true to Christ. Why settle for anything less?


May 22: Blessed Maria Domenica Brun Barbantini

May 22, 2009

Blessed Maria Domenica Brun Barbantini, 1789 – 1868 Read the rest of this entry »


How not to Raise Funds in the Catholic Church

June 19, 2008

This past weekend at the parish where I help out we had a visiting priest make an appeal for a development organization, Cross International. It raised some red flags:

  1. To Catholic audiences, Cross International presents itself as a Catholic ministry. The term “Catholic Outreach” is all over their literature complete with pictures of the pope, religious sisters, priests and bishop. But, I suspect that “Catholic Outreach” does not refer to Catholics reaching out to the poor as it may appear, but refers to that organization’s outreach to Catholics to fund their ministries. On the phone, once I had identified myself as a Catholic priest, the spokeswoman claimed that the organization was founded by Catholic lay people some 8 years ago.
  2. Their website indicates that they are a ministry of the Kielar Family Foundation. Some further research online revealed that the organization is, in fact, a Baptist organization. See this web link: http://www.crosstv.com/crossint.htm and then click on the “Statement of Faith” link. Read the rest of this entry »