Bonfires, Baptist Style

October 23, 2009

By now you all know about the little North Carolina church that plans to have a bonfire next Saturday night. Even though Baptists haven’t been around for more than a couple hundred years, the pastor thinks his word is the be-all and end-all of religion because they don’t have a central authority. Interestingly, Baptists claim to have been around since before Catholics and disclaim the idea that they’re Protestants. Yet, what Bible does this minister prefer?

The King James PROTESTANT Bible! Read the rest of this entry »


Text of Cardinal Kasper to Anglican Bishops: It’s Over

August 1, 2008

Anglicanism Fading from Historic Christianity

Cardinal Kasper, the best Catholic friend to the Anglican Communion, the one who has remained most optimistic for an ongoing relationship with Anglicanism, delivers the coup de grace wearing a velvet glove. Anglican orders will never be recognized and Anglican-Catholic relations are no longer ordered toward a future unity.

Emphasis mine.

Full text here.

The Catholic Church’s teaching regarding human sexuality, especially homosexuality, is clear, as set forth in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 2357-59. We are convinced that this teaching is well founded in the Old and in the New Testament, and therefore that faithfulness to the Scriptures and to apostolic tradition is at stake. I can only highlight what IARCCUM’s “Growing Together in Unity and Mission” said: “In the discussions on human sexuality within the Anglican Communion, and between it and the Catholic Church, stand anthropological and biblical hermeneutical questions which need to be addressed” (§86e). Not without reason is today’s principal theme at the Lambeth Conference concerned with biblical hermeneutics.

I would like briefly to draw your attention to the ARCIC statement “Life in Christ”, where it was noted (nn. 87-88) that Anglicans could agree with Catholics that homosexual activity is disordered, but that we might differ in the moral and pastoral advice we would offer to those seeking our counsel. We realise and appreciate that the recent statements of the Primates are consistent with that teaching, which was given clear expression in Resolution 1.10 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference. In light of tensions over the past years in this regard, a clear statement from the Anglican Communion would greatly strengthen the possibility of us giving common witness regarding human sexuality and marriage, a witness which is sorely needed in the world of today. Read the rest of this entry »


July 19: St. John Plessington, English Martyr, d. 1679

July 19, 2008

John William Plessington, Priest of the Apostolic Vicariate of England

Born: 1637 in Dimples, Lancashire, England (United Kingdom)

Martyred: 19 July 1679 in Chester, Cheshire, England (United Kingdom)

One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born at Dimples, Lancashire, England, the son of a Royalist Catholic. Educated at Valladolid, Spain, and St. Omer’s in France. he was ordained in Segovia in 1662. John returned to England after ordination and served as a missionary in Cheshire. He became a tutor at Puddington Hall near Chester until his arrest and martyrdom by hanging at Barrowshill, Boughton. near Chester. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1970.

Source.


GAFCON did nothing…

July 10, 2008

…well next to nothing. Status of conservative Anglicans prior to GAFCON:

  1. problematic membership in the AC which de facto now ordains gay bishops.
  2. odd structures not recognized by Canterbury (bishops of some provinces exercising authority in the territory of other provinces)
  3. inability to force the ABC to enforce church discipline
  4. a unity of agreement on gay issues between Anglocatholics and evangelical Anglicans
  5. status a party within Anglicanism rather than defining Anglicanism

So, what is the status of conservative Anglicans post GAFCON? Exactly the same with some minor differences: Read the rest of this entry »


The Best Hope for GAFCON

June 26, 2008

I have not always been a fan of Rev. Matt Kennedy. But, lately my estimation of him, a conservative Anglican cleric, has risen significantly. First, he changed his mind on WO and is now opposed. Second, he led his parish out of TEC. Both, are very good moves for this evangelical Anglican who has now written enough on Catholic theology at Stand Firm to make me wonder if he is edging toward becoming a crypto-Catholic.

Anyway, here is his very lucid explanation of what may come of GAFCON:

The brighter vision is that of a “Communion within a Communion.”

If we might leave here with at least the foundations laid for a new confessional and conciliar entity with its own leadership, its own “instruments of communion”, its own process of decision-making and discipline distinct from Canterbury then we will have created, or be well along the path to creating, a cohesive entity capable of gathering, growing, and empowering orthodox Anglicans that is not dependent upon the invitational decisions of one man. Read the rest of this entry »