May 17: Blessed Giulia Salzano

May 17, 2010

Blessed Giulia Salzano, 1846 – 1929 Read the rest of this entry »

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Proponents of Women’s Ordination just don’t get it!

September 3, 2009

Mantilla-twitch to Fr. Z who posted a request to weigh in on a survey about womens’ ordination. If the poll is still open, please vote no.

The Archbishop of Cincinnati has banned a nun from teaching in the Archdiocese.

Why?

She supports Women’s Ordination.

Problem?

Yes, indeed! Catholics are supposed to be Catholic. In addition to weekly Sunday Mass and regular Confession, Catholics are meant to adhere to church teaching.

That means all of it.

While there are a few things that I have some difficulty with, which is probably true with everyone, it’s one thing to have thoughts in my head. It’s another for others to know what they are. I’m not in a position to speak for, or to appear to be speaking for the Church; however, I don’t discuss those things with which I struggle. If I did? Pastor, Spiritual Director and Confessor are those with whom I may discuss these things. They’re not for public consumption.

If I worked for the church or volunteered with religious education, it would be a problem for me to allow my difficult areas to be known; public dissent would be inappropriate.

How much more inappropriate, then, is it for a professed religious to speak publicly against church teaching? A nun or religious sister has professed vows, usually including obedience; in addition to obeying church teaching, she must obey her superiors in her order. In turn, her order must obey the Bishop in whose territory it operates. That means that public dissent from church teaching is forbidden. If she is told to publicly recant, she must do so.

The nun in this story refuses. While she’s willing to remove her name from a webpage advocating for Women’s Ordination, she refuses Archbishop Pilarczyk’s requirement that she publicly recant. He, with good reason and with authority, properly bans her from teaching in his Archdiocese.

Her supporters bring up her 40 years of teaching, which is material only inasmuch as she has had 40 years to spread her dissent within the church. It’s no wonder that people are confused. The fact that she has taught for 40 years in no way relates to the fact that she is publicly advocating for something that is outside of church teaching. The Church is not a Democracy!

She says it’s about equality. It isn’t. It’s about wanting what you can’t have. If she thinks women’s ordination is that important, she should leave her order and join a church that ordains women.

The Church is true to Christ. Why settle for anything less?


US Nuns Facing Vatican Scrutiny

July 3, 2009

The Vatican is investigating American Nuns; for dissident behavior such as teaching and promoting Reiki, a healing modality of which the Church does not approve, and other various things, such as advocating for married priests and ordination of women. In short, the Vatican is trying to see if the nuns are actually Catholic.

Many religious orders have dispersed their ranks and are living in society, rather than in convents as was traditional;  are wearing street clothes rather than habits; are advocating ideas that are opposed to Church teaching, and their orders are declining, this investigation is a good thing. In contrast, orders that are more traditional and wear habits are growing. Hmmm.

Mother Mary Clare Millea

By LAURIE GOODSTEIN

The New York Times

The Vatican is quietly conducting two sweeping investigations of American nuns, a development that has startled and dismayed nuns who fear they are the targets of a doctrinal inquisition.

Nuns were the often-unsung workers who helped build the Roman Catholic Church in this country, planting schools and hospitals and keeping parishes humming. But for the last three decades, their numbers have been declining — to 60,000 today from 180,000 in 1965.

While some nuns say they are grateful that the Vatican is finally paying attention to their dwindling communities, many fear that the real motivation is to reel in American nuns who have reinterpreted their calling for the modern world. Read the rest of this entry »


April 20: Blessed Chiara Bosatta

April 20, 2009

Blessed Chiara Bosatta, 1858 – 1887


Happy 7th Anniversary To The Children Of Mary

January 17, 2009

Children of Mary –

An Emerging Semi-contemplative Community of Sisters to tell the world WE LOVE OUR EUCHARISTIC LORD AND THAT OUR EUCHARISTIC LORD THIRSTS TO BE LOVED BY ALL!

The Children of Mary is a semi-contemplative community of Sisters forming in the diocese of Columbus, Ohio. Read the rest of this entry »


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Third Order Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate

December 9, 2008

The Third Order Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate is an offshoot of the Franciscans Tertiaries of the Immaculate founded by Fr. Stefano Manelli, FI. They are totally dedicated to Our Lady sealed by the Marian vow of total consecration to the Immaculate, after the recent example of St. Maximilian Kolbe. They live a penitential life of prayer in community; have made private vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

 

Starting the day with Morning Prayer, the Sisters go out to work in a variety of church related occupations centered in the parish. They also make and sell rosaries, rosary bracelets, and a variety of craft items to help support the FI missions. Spiritually united with the other Sisters, each sister prays the Angelus, Rosary, Chaplet of Divine Mercy and other community prayers. Living a life of love and joy in the Immaculate, the Sisters seek to make Our lady known and loved and to bring all to Christ through the Immaculate. Coming together for meals, the Sisters are spiritually renewed with readings from a variety of pious works.

The Sisters live in community, wear a traditional habit, and are in total conformity with the church magisterium. Under the guidance of the FI priests, the Sisters share the same charism and spirituality as the FI missionary friars and Sisters, and also evangelize through mission appeals to support the FI missions. The formation program consists of aspirancy, postulancy, novitiate, and profession. The Sisters accept candidates beginning with the age of 18, as well as delayed vocations. They have one retreat Sunday a month, make a variety of novenas during the year, pray the Stations of the Cross, Franciscan crown and have choir practice as well as other spiritual exercises throughout the month.

After coming together for evening prayer, the Sisters enjoy each other’s company at recreation. Closing the day with night prayers, the Sisters retire after singing a hymn to Our Lady enclosing themselves under her mantle with the knowledge that they have brought joy and solace to mission lands through their prayer and support of Our Lady’s missionaries.

If you are interested of knowing more about these sisters, please write or contact:

Franciscan Tertiary Sisters of the Immaculate
E-Mail: maryqueenofapostles@cox.net
Telephone (401) 725-8417

SOURCE: http://www.marymediatrix.com/religious-life/franciscan-tertiary-sisters-of-the-immaculate/

NOTE TO READERS: If you have any suggestions for orders or communities you feel should be highlighted for TCB’s “Vocations Tuesday” please Contact us! @ ASimpleSinner@gmail.com!

 


VOCATIONS TUESDAY: Portsmouth Poor Claires

July 15, 2008

5 bob to: Roman Catholic Vocations which reprints:

“Poor Clares discuss their religious vocations”

By Tim Puet
2/26/2008
Catholic Times of Coumbus

CLOISTER – Sister Marie Therese (far left) Sister Imelda Marie (center) and Sister Marie St. Claire (right)pray at St. Joseph Monastery in Portsmouth, Ohio. (Catholic Times/Jack Kuston)

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio (Catholic Times) – Any notion that cloistered nuns who constantly pray before the Blessed Sacrament and spend much of their lives in silence must live a solemn, somewhat grim existence quickly disappears on a visit to St. Joseph Monastery in Portsmouth. Read the rest of this entry »