Father Jacques Marqette, May 18

May 18, 2010

Father Marquette preachingFather Jacques Marquette

Laon, France, June 1o, 1637 – May 18, 1675, Ludington, MI

Father Jacques Marquette SJ, sometimes known as Pere Marquette, was a French missionary who founded Michigan’s first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first non-Native Americans to see and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

Jacques Marquette was born in Laon, France, on June 1, 1637 and joined the Society of Jesus at age seventeen. After working and teaching in France for several years, he was dispatched to Quebec in 1666 to preach to the Native Americans, where he showed great proficiency in the local languages, especially Huron. In 1668 Father Marquette (French: Père Marquette) was redeployed by his superiors to missions farther up the St. Lawrence River in the western Great Lakes. He worked at Sault Ste. Marie and at the Mission of the Holy Spirit in La Pointe, on Lake Superior, near the present-day city of Ashland, Wisconsin. Here, he came into contact with members of the Illinois tribes, who told him of the existence of the Mississippi River and invited him to come teach further south. Because of wars between the Hurons at La Pointe and the neighboring Dakota people, however, Father Marquette had to relocate to the Straits of Mackinac; he informed his superiors about the rumored river and requested permission to explore it.

Leave was granted, and in 1673, Marquette was joined by Louis Joliet, a French Canadian explorer. They departed from St. Ignace on May 17, with two canoes and five other voyageurs of French-Indian ancestry. They followed Lake Michigan to the Bay of Green Bay and up the Fox River. From there, they portaged to the Wisconsin River, which they were told led to the river they sought. On June 17, they entered the Mississippi near Prairie du Chien.

The Joliet-Marquette expedition traveled to within 435 miles (700 km) of the Gulf of Mexico but turned back at the mouth of the Arkansas River. By this point they had encountered several natives carrying European trinkets, and they feared an encounter with explorers or colonists from Spain.[2] They followed the Mississippi back to the mouth of the Illinois River, which they learned from local natives was a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. They returned to Lake Michigan near the location of modern-day Chicago. Marquette stopped at the mission of St. Francis Xavier in Green Bay in September, while Joliet returned to Quebec to relate the news of their discoveries.

Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. In the spring of 1675, the missionary again paddled westward and celebrated a public Mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery picked up during the Mississippi expedition, however, had sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.

The Michigan Historical Marker at this location reads:

Father Marquette Memorial Father Jacques Marquette, the great Jesuit missionary and explorer, died and was buried by two French companions somewhere along the Lake Michigan shore on May 18, 1675. He had been returning to his mission at St. Ignace which he had left in 1673 to go exploring in the Mississippi country. The exact location of his death has long been a subject of controversy. A spot close to the southeast slope of this hill, near the ancient outlet of the Pere Marquette River, corresponds with the death site as located by early French accounts and maps and a constant tradition of the past. Marquette’s remains were reburied at St. Ignace in 1677. ”

His grave is now located at what is currently the Ojibway Museum on State Street in downtown St. Ignace. Father Marquette is memorialized in several towns and rivers that bear his name (such as Marquette, Michigan), as well as the Father Marquette National Memorial near St. Ignace. Pere Marquette State Park near Grafton, Illinois, is located at the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and is the site where Indians of the Illini Confederation showed Marquette a faster return route to the Great Lakes.

SOURCE

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Albania wants Mother Teresa’s Bones

October 17, 2009

It’s reported that Albania has told India that it wants the Relics of Mother Teresa and India says, “hell no!”. While Mother Teresa was a resident and citizen of India, she had two passports; an Indian Diplomatic Passport and one from that tiny little place called The Holy See. She was raised in Skopje, Macedonia, when it was still part of Yugoslavia, though her family was Albanian and she initially traveled on an Albanian passport. Her Albanian passport was revoked under Communist rule; now that Communism has passed, Albania wants her relics on their shores to bury her with her mother and sister. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed James Desire Laval, September 9

September 9, 2009

Blessed James Desire Laval

Blessed James Desire Laval Priest
Croth (Evreux), Normandy, September 18, 1803 – Port-Louis, Mauritius, September 9, 1864

He was born in France in 1803 to a middle-class family that pushed him to graduate in medicine. Escaping from an accident, he decided to leave the medical profession to become a missionary. Sent in 1841 on the island of Mauritius, he enthusiastically devoted himself to the evangelization of the Blacks who had been legally freed from slavery, but left to themselves. His “chosen field” caused serious conflicts with other missionaries and even with the bishop, who wanted to devote himself only to the children of white settlers. His “incarnation” in the world of “negritude” led him to value all the positive elements of local culture not, only religious, but also the indigenous. James Laval was beatified by Pope John Paul II, who stressed the fact that he had placed “on one side, the side of the last, the Blacks in a time of racism.” Read the rest of this entry »


Catholics In Need: Ivory Coast

April 28, 2009

One Bread Delivers Bibles to St. John the Baptist Mission in Mandallah

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Africa:

 

This summer our African Missionary in the Ivory Coast, West Africa, travelled north in his country to the city of Mandallah, and the St. John the Baptist Mission to delivery 688 bibles in two native languages spoken by the villagers.

 

Above, at a special Mass at which the bibles were presented to the congregation, the altar servers carried some of the bibles to the altar.

The grant to purchase these bibles for the mission was provided by a Catholic foundation in Raleigh, North Carolina. The congregation was most grateful and will use these bibles in their catechism classes.

Below One Bread’s African representative, Bekoli Boika, presents the bibles to the priest in front of the congregation.

 

The Congregation of St John the Baptist Mission at the start of the Mass at which the bibles were presented.

 

To request materials for use in Africa, please contact:
Mr. Boika Bekoli Louis
One Bread Lay Apostolate-Africa
25 BP 1100 Abidjan 25
Ivory Coast, West Africa
1bread-africa@excite.com
(+225) 07845050

 


Dominican Mission to Pakistan

January 15, 2009

Click to watch a vintage documentary.

From Ordo Praedicatorum.


Help Needed In Ivory Coast

April 28, 2008

One Bread Delivers Bibles to St. John the Baptist Mission in Mandallah

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Africa:

 

This summer our African Missionary in the Ivory Coast, West Africa, travelled north in his country to the city of Mandallah, and the St. John the Baptist Mission to delivery 688 bibles in two native languages spoken by the villagers.

 

Above, at a special Mass at which the bibles were presented to the congregation, the altar servers carried some of the bibles to the altar.

The grant to purchase these bibles for the mission was provided by a Catholic foundation in Raleigh, North Carolina. The congregation was most grateful and will use these bibles in their catechism classes.

Below One Bread’s African representative, Bekoli Boika, presents the bibles to the priest in front of the congregation.

 

The Congregation of St John the Baptist Mission at the start of the Mass at which the bibles were presented.

 

To request materials for use in Africa, please contact:
Mr. Boika Bekoli Louis
One Bread Lay Apostolate-Africa
25 BP 1100 Abidjan 25
Ivory Coast, West Africa
1bread-africa@excite.com
(+225) 07845050


April 7: Blessed Maria Assunta Pallotta, Missionary To China

April 7, 2008

blessed-maria-assunta-pallotta.jpg
Blessed Maria Assunta Pallotta, 1878-1905
“the first non-martyr missionary sister to be beatified in the history of the Church.”