May 22: Saint Michael Ho Dinh Hy

May 22, 2010

Saint Michael Ho Dinh Hy, 1808 – 1857 Read the rest of this entry »

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St. Francis Jaccard, September 21

September 21, 2009

St. Francis JaccardSt. Francis Jaccard, Priest and Martyr
+ Vietnam, September 20, 1838


Roman Martyrology: In the fortress of Quang-Tr in Annam, now Viet Nam, the holy martyr Francis Jaccard, a priest of the Society for Foreign Missions of Paris, who, under Emperor Minh Ming, for Christ, suffered imprisonment and beatings and died, finally, strangled.

He was born in Onion (now dioc. Annecy) on Sept. 6. 1799 and then completed his studies in the seminaries of Melanie and Chambery, came in 1821 in the Foreign Missions of Paris. Ordained a priest, he was sent to the mission of Cochin China, and appointed Metropolitan General, took up residence at Phuong-Ru. Denounced by a treacherous pay (14 July, 1827), when he saw the village surrounded by soldiers, managed to hide in the thick of a forest of bamboo, but then, seeing no escape and ruin on the other hand, fearing that if he was not found, the fury of the troops would be unleashed upon the faithful, came out of hiding and surrendered to the soldiers. Conducted to Hue, he was charged with various translations and was able to earn the esteem of so deeply attached to the court, which obtained permission for him to return to his missionary work, while continuing to deal with any translation requirements. But he always lived in a state of alert because the prosecution did not promise in place a secure life. While, in fact, he was in the Christian village of Duong-Son, the pagans of the nearby village of Lao Cai-accused him of having led his people to rob, which is perfectly true. But the prefect did not accept his defense and informed the king, which put the punishment.

Past court to court, he was first sentenced to death and then his sentence was commuted to exile in the province of Ai-Lao (1833), then at Cam-Lo.

But here’s a novel question: the school is open from Candah Di-Loan aroused the ire of the king, who ordered its destruction, promoting, at the same time, surveys to find out what part he ad the Jaccard. Mandarins recognized him innocent, but no other questions, told him to apostate, his refusal to do so resulted in the Canga and chains being imposed and he was dragged to the prison in Quang-Tri, where he found his future companion in martyrdom, Tommaso Thien. There he had to undergo many floggings until he could no longer stand. Later the tongs were burning in the thighs thickened, thus burning his flesh to the bone, finally, on Sept. 20. 1838 he suffered death by strangulation, along with Thien.

The bodies of the martyrs were buried in them were, side by side, and in 1847 the relics were transported to Paris in the seminary of Foreign Missions. He was beatified by Pope Leo XIII on May 27. 1900. Canonized on June 19, 1988 by Pope John Paul II, together with 117 other Martyrs of Tonkin.

Author: Celestino Testore

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Jean-Charles Cornay, September 20

September 20, 2009

Saint Jean-Charles Cornay

Saint Jean-Charles Cornay, Priest and Martyr
Loudun, France, February 27, 1809 – Son Tay, Vietnam, September 20, 1837

Today the Church remembers the many Martyrs, ancient and modern. For example, the massive group of those killed in Korea in the nineteenth century. Jean-Charles Cornay was a French priest who, instead, was killed in contempt of faith in Tonkin (Vietnam). And in a very bloody: he was torn to pieces. He belonged to the Institute for Foreign Missions of Paris and had arrived in Macao. Precusagli the way to China, his goal, he remained in Tonkin. Here he was betrayed, falsely accused of fomenting an insurgency, tortured, and – after refusing to recant – sentenced to death in 1837 at age 28.

Roman Martyrology: In the fortress of Son-Tay Tonkin, now Vietnam, San Giovanni Carlo Cornay, priest of the Society for Foreign Missions of Paris, and Martyr, who, after cruel tortures, by decree of Emperor Minh M Ng was rendered into pieces and eventually beheaded for his Christian faith.

Many missionaries and indigenous Christians sprayed the Vietnamese earth with their blood, being killed for their faith in God. 117 of them, Tonkin Martyrs, were canonized in Rome June 19, 1988 by Pope John Paul II and among them was the French priest Jean-Charles Cornay.

Born in Loundun, in the French department of Vienne, 27 February 1809, his parents were Jean-Baptiste and Françoise Mayaud, they raised him and his two sisters in the faith. Subsequently he studied at the college of Saint-Louis, Saumur and later with the Jesuits of montmorillonite. He wast a regular student, humble and with a gentle character.

His vocation surprised his parents; when he expressed the desire to become a missionary he was met with reluctance and misunderstanding. He had to start his first battle at a time to respond positively to the call of God, opposing the opinion of parents, while affirming his filial love.

He spent a brief period at the Seminary of Foreign Missions of Paris, a period of uncertainty due to the revolution of July, in which the seminary was a target. Jean-Charles recorded it in his memoirs: “Hier on penetrate dans notre séminaire et l’on a affiché sept ou huit portant Mort aux billets Jésuites de la rue du Bac, et comme poignard a signature”.

His departure was sudden for Cornay replaced another missionary. His destination was to be Seu-Tchouan in China two thousand kilometers from the coast. He landed in Macau after six months of travel. Had to reach Tonkin, but the two guides sent to meet him never arrived. Jean-Charles Cornay finally arrived in Tonkin in 1831, the height of anti-Christian persecution.

As time passed, his hopes of reaching China one day decreased. He decided to remain in this land and on April 26, 1834 he was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop at Havard Hanio after a trip on the Red River disguised as Chinese. During the grueling period in which he exercised his ministry he was always calm, cheerful and characterized by a spirit of holiness.

In 1835 he was arrested by French missionaries and others against him, the authorities forged a charge of treason for having buried the weapons in a land they tilled. He was then locked in a series of bamboo cages, a torture very common in Vietnam at that time, and since he was young and had a beautiful voice was forced to sing for his persecutors, but he chose to sing the Salve Regina. Finally he was sentenced to death by the court subremo and, on the orders of Emperor Minh Mang, beheaded September 20, 1837 at the fortitude of Son Tay.

In his last letter to his parents, he wrote: “You will receive Lorsque cette lettre, mon cher père, ma chere mere, affligez ne vous pas de ma mort, en consentant à mon départ, vous avez déjà fait la plus grande partie du sacrifice. Under the terms of the award, his body was then “cut into pieces and […] the head, after being exposed for three days, […] thrown into the river.” The courageous example of Cornay determined the vocation of St. Theophane Venard. The Martyrologium Romanum today commemorates St Giancarlo Cornay, on the anniversary of his birth into heaven.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Ignacio Delgado y Cebrian, July 12

July 12, 2009

Blessed Ignatius Delgado, Henares etc

Saint Ignatius Delgado

Villafeliche, Spain, 1761-July 12, 1838, Tonkin, Vietnam

Canonized together with 116 other Martyrs of Vietnam whose Memorial is November 24

“This stranger, who was introduced clandestinely into the kingdom, spends his life in the study of things of the heart and in meditation on what is incomprehensible…(From the death sentence of Bishop Ignatius Delgado.)”

Continuing the saga of the martyrs of Tonkin, nearly a hundred years after the death of Blessed Peter Martyrs Sanz and companions, two more Dominicans bishops died for the faith . They were Bishop Ignatius Delgado and Bishop Dominic Henares. With them a tertiary catechist died, Francis Chien, and the group (beautified in 1900 by Pope Leo XIII) also includes a Spanish priest, Joseph Fernandez, Father Augustine Schoeffler of the Paris Foreign Mission Society, who was a Dominican Tertiary, and twenty-one native confraternity members. Read the rest of this entry »