The Ordinariate as the Church’s front porch

October 23, 2010

It is perhaps a bit premature, but I’ve been thinking for years that a new Anglican body within the Catholic Church will bring with it to Peter’s barque more than tasteful vestments and glorious formal hymnody and a sense for the  quaint and antiquated. It will bring fishers of men.

 

That has been my hope and it seems to be confirmed here and there that evangelization will be its mission.  Catholicism in English speaking lands Read the rest of this entry »


Ex-Muslim Wafa Sultan Tells it Like it is

August 15, 2008

What is Wrong with Post Modern Religion in 2 minutes 39 seconds

August 15, 2008

“I think it is up for each one of us to interpret what God wants.”

Post modernism is the direct fruit of Sola Scriptura, by which everyone can just come up with their own interpretation of revelation.


Anglican Bitterness over Converts to Rome

August 14, 2008

It’s all over the net. All kinds of talk about Anglicans swimming, put on swim trunks, taking the plunge, testing the waters, dipping the toe, crossing over, etc. It will be a wonder if the Tiber can handle the traffic as well as it handles the copious references to the metaphor … if they all come.

Those who do come are deserving of a hearty welcome from those of us standing along the shore. They certainly will have paid a hefty price in strained and even lost friendships as they have made a momentous and meaningful journey to the Catholic Church.

As an Anglican watcher I have noticed a distinct pattern on most Anglican blogs. Whenever something positive about the Catholic Church is posted there is a strong and bitter reaction among many of the commenters. Antipathy toward the Catholic Church is deeply ingrained in the minds of Anglicans and protestants from an early age. So it erupts almost without reflection whenever the moment calls for it. It has been particularly heavy in the wake of word of talks between some Diocese of Fort Worth Episcopal clergy and the local Catholic bishop.

Here is an example of the kind of visceral bitterness that has surfaced at blogs like the Continuum: Read the rest of this entry »


St. Peter Claver

August 12, 2008

For those convinced that the Catholic Church was forcing conversions in New Spain, let me introduce you to St. Peter Claver.

A native of Catalonia, Spain, Peter Claver spent all his adult life in Cartagena, Colombia, the center of the slave trade in the new world. Appalled at the dehumanization of the whole dirty business of slave trading, he made a personal vow in addition to those of his religious profession as a Jesuit–that until his death, he would serve and advocate on behalf of the Africans sold into slavery.

While the commonly regarded among Europeans as little more than advanced animals, he insisted that they were truly equal in worth and dignity to the Europeans. In his lifetime Peter Claver ministered to over 300,000 Africans brought to South America as slaves. Despite the contempt for him among the merchant and landed classes, his work was supported by the Jesuit Order and he was canonized a saint by Pope Leo XIII in 1888. His work and writings along with others such as Bartolome de las Casas, while broadly rejected in his time laid the foundation for the eventual rejection of the institution of slavery by the Catholic Church and the European powers by the early 19th Century.

An exerpt from one of his letters: Read the rest of this entry »


Inca Processional Hymn from 1631

August 11, 2008

“Hanacpachap cussicuinin” is processional hymn in the Quechua language of Peru (Inca), this piece was most likely written by a native composer and later published by the Franciscan scholar Juan Pérez Bocanegra in 1631, thus becoming the first example of polyphony printed in the Americas.

Read the rest of this entry »


Witness the Devotion of a New Generation

July 20, 2008

I know the music is contemporary and many traditionalists will not like it. Still, it captures the Spirit of modern youth and fits with the Holy Father’s them of the Holy Spirit for WYD 2008. When I saw these images I was truly moved.


WYD: Benedict Bedazzles at Sydney Harbor

July 20, 2008

Having been to two WYD’s (Toronto and Cologne) I can attest that they are supremely powerful experiences. To have the gospel sifted for its specific message for today’s youth by the greatest spiritual authorities on earth is just impossible to express. It is overwhelming.

But, it can be hard to convey that experience to those who were not there.

However, Benedict’s words in themselves, even without all the experiencial props to heighten the experience, have a power to clear ones thinking and set ones heart aright. He seamlessly weaves together concerns for the environment, sexual exploitation, materialism and secularism all in light of the universal spiritual hunger for the Gospel. Powerful!

Here are some of his words at Sydney Harbor on Thursday:

“…Dear friends, life is not governed by chance; it is not random. Your very existence has been willed by God, blessed and given a purpose (cf. Gen 1:28)! Life is not just a succession of events or experiences, helpful though many of them are. It is a search for the true, the good and the beautiful. It is to this end that we make our choices; it is for this that we exercise our freedom; it is in this – in truth, in goodness, and in beauty – that we find happiness and joy. Do not be fooled by those who see you as just another consumer in a market of undifferentiated possibilities, where choice itself becomes the good, novelty usurps beauty, and subjective experience displaces truth. Read the rest of this entry »


July 19: St. John Plessington, English Martyr, d. 1679

July 19, 2008

John William Plessington, Priest of the Apostolic Vicariate of England

Born: 1637 in Dimples, Lancashire, England (United Kingdom)

Martyred: 19 July 1679 in Chester, Cheshire, England (United Kingdom)

One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born at Dimples, Lancashire, England, the son of a Royalist Catholic. Educated at Valladolid, Spain, and St. Omer’s in France. he was ordained in Segovia in 1662. John returned to England after ordination and served as a missionary in Cheshire. He became a tutor at Puddington Hall near Chester until his arrest and martyrdom by hanging at Barrowshill, Boughton. near Chester. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1970.

Source.