Blessed Thomas Somers, December 10

December 10, 2009

Blessed Thomas Somers, Priest and Martyr
+ Tyburn, England, December 10, 1610

Thomas Somers, a Priest from the Westmoreland, shared the fate of the Benedictine John Roberts: both because they were accused, convicted and hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to convert to Anglicanism. Thomas Somers was beatified in 1929 by Pope Pius XI and some of his relics are found in the Abbey of Downside.

Roman Martyrology: At Tyburn, nineteen years later, Saint John Roberts, the Order of St. Benedict, and Blessed Thomas Somers, Priests and Martyrs, who, under King James I were condemned for their priesthood, they were hung together at the same scaffold as sixteen criminals.

source: Santi e Beati


Saint Alexander Briant, December 1

December 1, 2009

Saint Alexander Briant, Jesuit Priest and Martyr

Somerset, England, about 1556 – Tyburn, London, December 1, 1581

Roman Martyrology: In London, England, Saint Edmund Campion, Rodolfo Sherwin and Alexander Briant, priests and martyrs under Queen Elizabeth I, celebrated for their ingenuity and strength in faith. Edmund, who from an early age he professed the Catholic faith, admitted into the Society of Jesus in Rome and was ordained priest in Prague, he returned home, where, for their efforts in comforting the souls of the faithful with his words and his writings , was killed, after many torments, at Tyburn. With him suffered the same torments the saints Rudolph and Alexander, the second of which he obtained in prison to be admitted into the Society of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »


St John Lloyd, July 22

July 22, 2009

Saint John Lloyd

St John Lloyd Priest and Martyr
July 22
+ Cardiff, Wales, 22 July 1679

Roman Martyrology: At Cardiff, Wales, Saint John Lloyd, priest and martyr, who under King Charles II was hanged for having exercised the priesthood in his homeland.

He was a native of Brecknockshire and belonged to an ancient Welsh family, very little information is available about his life. We do know that he entered the English College in Valladolid, Spain, in1649, under the fictitious name of Floyd, where he received the sacred order on July 7, 1653 (cf. Bnglish Registers of the College at Valladolid 11589-1862, ed. E. Henson, London 1930, p. 164). He studied philosophy and theology, and was immediately launched on a mission to England, so he returned on April 17, 1654, going to his native Wales, whhere, for almost twenty-five years he continued his activities. We don’t have much information abou his missionary work or the circumstances of his capture, which occurred on the end of 1678 in the house of Turberville at Penllyne in the county of Glamorgan.

St. John Lloyd is one of the many victims of the merciless persecution caused by the alleged Papist plot conceived by the evil English adventurer Titus Oates. Locked in a secret castle of Cardano for over five months before the persecutors were able to induce someone to testify against him, he was finally tried on May 5, 1679, and declared guilty of high treason to be ordained a priest abroad and have practiced at home the functions of the ministry against the prohibition of the law then in force, thus condemned to death by hanging and subsequent rendering. The execution of the sentence, however, was held over two and a half months later, in Cardiff on July 22, 1679. Before being executed, Saint John Lloyd, exposed the real reasons for their deaths in a short speech, the text of which is reported by R. Challoner (see op. Cit.).

Beatified by Pope Pius XI on 15 December. 1929 (cf. AAS, XXII [1930], p. 18, n. CXLVI), St. John Lloyd is commemorated July 22, together with the Jesuit Priest, Philip Evans who was captured shortly before he was and met the same fate.

Canononized on October 29, 1970 by Pope Paul VI, as one of 40 Martyrs of England and Wales.

Source: Santi e Beati


July 19: St. John Plessington, English Martyr, d. 1679

July 19, 2008

John William Plessington, Priest of the Apostolic Vicariate of England

Born: 1637 in Dimples, Lancashire, England (United Kingdom)

Martyred: 19 July 1679 in Chester, Cheshire, England (United Kingdom)

One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born at Dimples, Lancashire, England, the son of a Royalist Catholic. Educated at Valladolid, Spain, and St. Omer’s in France. he was ordained in Segovia in 1662. John returned to England after ordination and served as a missionary in Cheshire. He became a tutor at Puddington Hall near Chester until his arrest and martyrdom by hanging at Barrowshill, Boughton. near Chester. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1970.

Source.