Proponents of Women’s Ordination just don’t get it!

September 3, 2009

Mantilla-twitch to Fr. Z who posted a request to weigh in on a survey about womens’ ordination. If the poll is still open, please vote no.

The Archbishop of Cincinnati has banned a nun from teaching in the Archdiocese.

Why?

She supports Women’s Ordination.

Problem?

Yes, indeed! Catholics are supposed to be Catholic. In addition to weekly Sunday Mass and regular Confession, Catholics are meant to adhere to church teaching.

That means all of it.

While there are a few things that I have some difficulty with, which is probably true with everyone, it’s one thing to have thoughts in my head. It’s another for others to know what they are. I’m not in a position to speak for, or to appear to be speaking for the Church; however, I don’t discuss those things with which I struggle. If I did? Pastor, Spiritual Director and Confessor are those with whom I may discuss these things. They’re not for public consumption.

If I worked for the church or volunteered with religious education, it would be a problem for me to allow my difficult areas to be known; public dissent would be inappropriate.

How much more inappropriate, then, is it for a professed religious to speak publicly against church teaching? A nun or religious sister has professed vows, usually including obedience; in addition to obeying church teaching, she must obey her superiors in her order. In turn, her order must obey the Bishop in whose territory it operates. That means that public dissent from church teaching is forbidden. If she is told to publicly recant, she must do so.

The nun in this story refuses. While she’s willing to remove her name from a webpage advocating for Women’s Ordination, she refuses Archbishop Pilarczyk’s requirement that she publicly recant. He, with good reason and with authority, properly bans her from teaching in his Archdiocese.

Her supporters bring up her 40 years of teaching, which is material only inasmuch as she has had 40 years to spread her dissent within the church. It’s no wonder that people are confused. The fact that she has taught for 40 years in no way relates to the fact that she is publicly advocating for something that is outside of church teaching. The Church is not a Democracy!

She says it’s about equality. It isn’t. It’s about wanting what you can’t have. If she thinks women’s ordination is that important, she should leave her order and join a church that ordains women.

The Church is true to Christ. Why settle for anything less?

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Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, September 1

September 1, 2009

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, Priest and Martyr

Villacreces, Spain, September 3, 1912 – Barcelona, Spain, late August / early September 1936

He is remembered on September 1


Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, Martyr Pedro Rivera, a priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, Maria Carmela Moreno Benítez and Maria del Rifugio Carbonell Muñoz, Institute of virgin Mary Help of Christians, who in the same persecution, complied with the Passion of Christ the Bridegroom, came to the reward of eternal peace.

Candido Rivera Rivera was born September 3, 1912 at Villacreces in the Spanish diocese of Leon. Entering the Order of Friars Minor Conventual with the name of Pedro, he made his novitiate in Granollers and he made his temporary vows in 1928. Posted in Italy to attend his theological studies in Osimo, he made his solemn vows in Rome in 1933, while in 1935 he obtained a licentiate in theology and was ordained a priest.

“ He then returned home and, despite his young age, he was appointed superior of the community of Granollers, in recognition of his moral qualities, spiritual and cultural. He always showed genuine disciple of St. Francis, full of love for the consecrated life, excellent higher education, humble and kind to the brethren, a man of peace, particularly pious and devout to the Blessed Sacrament and the Virgin Mary.

“ At the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Father Pedro was expelled from the monastery with his fellow revolutionaries and sought refuge with some family friends. However, he was discovered and arrested on July 25, 1936. So he just had to prepare for the imminent martyrdom confessing to the priest of Llinas, who confided: “If I have the grace to be killed, die shouting ‘Long live Christ the King.” Two days later he was released and went to Barcelona, but was arrested again August 22. Probably between late August and early September 1936 he was shot. Everyone immediately considered him a martyr of the faith.

“ Pedro Rivera Rivera and her fis brothers belonging to the Order of Friars Minor Conventual were Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II with a group made a total of no less than 233 martyrs of that persecution.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret, August 31

August 31, 2009

Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret

Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret, Priest
Manresa (Barcelona), May 30, 1905 – Barcelona, August 31, 1950

Born in Spain in Manresa (Barcelona) on May 30, 1905 to parents who believed. He was a student of the Jesuit fathers and Scolopi, studying medicine; build the clinic of Our Lady of Mercy in Barcelona. Are the years of the Spanish Civil War in July of 1938 the Pere Tarrés Claret is enlisted as a doctor in the Republican military activities which heundertook with exemplary charity. Meanwhile the blessed studied Latin and philosophy, had only one desire to become a priest; he entered the seminary in ’39, four years later, he was ordained priest. He graduated in theology at the Pontifical University of Salamanca. He returned to Barcelona, where he held positions in Catholic education in particular for the youth in the parish ministry and as chaplain of the religious institutes of women. In May 1950, after being biopsied, he was diagnosed with lymphoma lymphosarcoma, and died a few months later, on August 31, just 45, on the clinic he founded. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II at Loreto on September 5, 2004, during the largest gathering of Catholic Action which was held in the Marian city, and the two young members of Italian Catholic Alberto Rimini Marvelli and Pina Suriano Partinico were present. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, August 29

August 29, 2009

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Híjar, Spain, March 29, 1912 – August 29, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Híjar always at Teruel in Spain, blessed Francis Monzón Romeo, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who in the same persecution confirmed with blood for his fidelity to the Lord.

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon on March 11, 2001, one of 233 Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Beatified that day by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), August 28

August 28, 2009

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample)

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), Priest and Martyr
February 3, 1896, Viñales (Valencia), Spain-
August 28, 1938, Viñales (Valencia), Spain

Roman Martyrology: Near the village of Viñales still in the same area, blessed Aurelio (Joseph) Ample Alcaide, Order of Friars Minor Capuchin Priest and Martyr, who, during the same period in the battle for the faith brought the glorious prize.

Was born February 3, 1896 in Viñales (Valencia), third of seven children who were spouses D. Ample and Donna Manuela Vicente Alcaide. He was baptized the day after birth, ie February 4, in the parish of San Honorato bishop, and received Confirmation April 21, 1899.

“ He first studied the Seraphic Seminary of Massamagrell (Valencia). Wore the Capuchin habit in 1912, he made his temporary profession of vows on, August 10, 1913 and perpetual December 18, 1917. He was then sent to Rome to perfect himself in his studies and was ordained a priest in the Eternal City March 26, 1921 by the Archbishop of Filipos, Bishop Joseph Palica. Back in Spain, he was appointed director of the student of philosophy and theology of the Capuchins in Orihuela (Alicante), office held, and overall satisfaction with care until death.

“ “Among the faithful he enjoyed the reputation of a saint – said the priest Worker Diocesan D. Pascual Ortells – and that fame also joined the test. Was faithful observant of all the rules of St. Francis, commit itself to helping its total so that young men were perfect. “

“ During the Revolution of 1936 all the religious of the convent of Orihuela dispersed on July 13. P. Aurelio sought refuge in the family home in Viñales, in which, on 28 August, was captured by gunmen and taken to his place of death. Before being killed he urged all his comrades to die well, gave them absolution, and then added, “Cry aloud, live Christ the King.”

“ He was killed August 28, 1936. His body was interred in the cemetery of Foyos (Valencia), near where he had been killed. After the civil war, his remains were exhumed and carried into the cemetery Vinalesa September 17, 1937. He is currently buried in the chapel of the convent of the Capuchin martyrs Maddalena Massamagrell.

“ P. Aurelio retain the use within, since he was captured until death, all remaining faithful to Christ. “He kept the peace until the last moment – he says Rafael Rodrigo, the witness of his martyrdom – encouraging all of us that we were going to die. When everything was ready for execution, urges us to recite the formula of the act of contrition. So we did, and when the Servant of God was reciting the formula of a militiaman gave him two slaps. One of the militiamen said to his companion not to slap him more, because it was not worth the trouble, given the time of life we have left. The Servant of God remained unchanged and continued to injury before the acquittal until the end. As soon as the Servant of God had finished his sacred duty, a volley rang out and we fell with him all repeating the cry: ‘Long live Christ the King!’.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Spanish Capuchins, Martyrs of Valencia, 12 friars and 5 Poor Clares, who suffered martyrdom during the civil war and religious persecution that through their homeland in the 30s of the twentieth century. Pope John Paul II Beatified them on March 11, 2001, together with a group totaling 233 martyrs of the same persecution.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, August 27

August 27, 2009

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, Priest and Martyr
August 27

Roman Martyrology: Along the road between the towns of Godella Bétera and in the same region in Spain, blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, priest and martyr who shed their blood for Christ during the same persecution against the faith.On March 11, 2001, Pope John Paul II Beatified in St. Peter’s Square in Rome 233 Spanish martyrs, including the thickest cloud of witnesses of faith elevated to the glory of the altars in the course of his pontificate.

“ These numerous innocent lambs of the cause of Christ were killed out of hatred for their faith during the brutal religious persecution that characterized the Spanish Civil War in the 30s of the twentieth century. In this bloody massacre that through Spain, the number of victims over a million, affecting people of all ages and social class: bishops, priests, religious and laity of both sexes. It was well established by historians that, within this terrible massacre, anarchists and socialists-communists perpetrated a real persecution aimed at destroying the Catholic Church in Spain.

The martyrs were divided into smaller groups, based on their Archdiocese. Blessed Raimondo is part of the group known as José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia who were Decreed on Martyrs on December 18, 2000

Source:  Santi e Beati


Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, August 24

August 24, 2009

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr
Gmina Żarnowiec, Poland, February 21, 1908 – Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942

Blessed Maksymilian Binkiewicz, Polish diocesan priest, was born in Gmina Żarnowiec (Olkusz) February 21, 1908 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 together with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp at Dachau near Munich in Germany, Monaco, blessed Maximian Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr, who, during the war, was deported by the invading soldiers from Poland because of his faith in Christ and he died under torture and torture.

Source: Santi e Beati