Proponents of Women’s Ordination just don’t get it!

September 3, 2009

Mantilla-twitch to Fr. Z who posted a request to weigh in on a survey about womens’ ordination. If the poll is still open, please vote no.

The Archbishop of Cincinnati has banned a nun from teaching in the Archdiocese.

Why?

She supports Women’s Ordination.

Problem?

Yes, indeed! Catholics are supposed to be Catholic. In addition to weekly Sunday Mass and regular Confession, Catholics are meant to adhere to church teaching.

That means all of it.

While there are a few things that I have some difficulty with, which is probably true with everyone, it’s one thing to have thoughts in my head. It’s another for others to know what they are. I’m not in a position to speak for, or to appear to be speaking for the Church; however, I don’t discuss those things with which I struggle. If I did? Pastor, Spiritual Director and Confessor are those with whom I may discuss these things. They’re not for public consumption.

If I worked for the church or volunteered with religious education, it would be a problem for me to allow my difficult areas to be known; public dissent would be inappropriate.

How much more inappropriate, then, is it for a professed religious to speak publicly against church teaching? A nun or religious sister has professed vows, usually including obedience; in addition to obeying church teaching, she must obey her superiors in her order. In turn, her order must obey the Bishop in whose territory it operates. That means that public dissent from church teaching is forbidden. If she is told to publicly recant, she must do so.

The nun in this story refuses. While she’s willing to remove her name from a webpage advocating for Women’s Ordination, she refuses Archbishop Pilarczyk’s requirement that she publicly recant. He, with good reason and with authority, properly bans her from teaching in his Archdiocese.

Her supporters bring up her 40 years of teaching, which is material only inasmuch as she has had 40 years to spread her dissent within the church. It’s no wonder that people are confused. The fact that she has taught for 40 years in no way relates to the fact that she is publicly advocating for something that is outside of church teaching. The Church is not a Democracy!

She says it’s about equality. It isn’t. It’s about wanting what you can’t have. If she thinks women’s ordination is that important, she should leave her order and join a church that ordains women.

The Church is true to Christ. Why settle for anything less?


Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, September 1

September 1, 2009

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera

Blessed Pedro Rivera Rivera, Priest and Martyr

Villacreces, Spain, September 3, 1912 – Barcelona, Spain, late August / early September 1936

He is remembered on September 1


Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, also in Spain, Martyr Pedro Rivera, a priest of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, Maria Carmela Moreno Benítez and Maria del Rifugio Carbonell Muñoz, Institute of virgin Mary Help of Christians, who in the same persecution, complied with the Passion of Christ the Bridegroom, came to the reward of eternal peace.

Candido Rivera Rivera was born September 3, 1912 at Villacreces in the Spanish diocese of Leon. Entering the Order of Friars Minor Conventual with the name of Pedro, he made his novitiate in Granollers and he made his temporary vows in 1928. Posted in Italy to attend his theological studies in Osimo, he made his solemn vows in Rome in 1933, while in 1935 he obtained a licentiate in theology and was ordained a priest.

“ He then returned home and, despite his young age, he was appointed superior of the community of Granollers, in recognition of his moral qualities, spiritual and cultural. He always showed genuine disciple of St. Francis, full of love for the consecrated life, excellent higher education, humble and kind to the brethren, a man of peace, particularly pious and devout to the Blessed Sacrament and the Virgin Mary.

“ At the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Father Pedro was expelled from the monastery with his fellow revolutionaries and sought refuge with some family friends. However, he was discovered and arrested on July 25, 1936. So he just had to prepare for the imminent martyrdom confessing to the priest of Llinas, who confided: “If I have the grace to be killed, die shouting ‘Long live Christ the King.” Two days later he was released and went to Barcelona, but was arrested again August 22. Probably between late August and early September 1936 he was shot. Everyone immediately considered him a martyr of the faith.

“ Pedro Rivera Rivera and her fis brothers belonging to the Order of Friars Minor Conventual were Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II with a group made a total of no less than 233 martyrs of that persecution.

Author: Fabio Arduino

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret, August 31

August 31, 2009

Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret

Blessed Pere Tarres i Claret, Priest
Manresa (Barcelona), May 30, 1905 – Barcelona, August 31, 1950

Born in Spain in Manresa (Barcelona) on May 30, 1905 to parents who believed. He was a student of the Jesuit fathers and Scolopi, studying medicine; build the clinic of Our Lady of Mercy in Barcelona. Are the years of the Spanish Civil War in July of 1938 the Pere Tarrés Claret is enlisted as a doctor in the Republican military activities which heundertook with exemplary charity. Meanwhile the blessed studied Latin and philosophy, had only one desire to become a priest; he entered the seminary in ’39, four years later, he was ordained priest. He graduated in theology at the Pontifical University of Salamanca. He returned to Barcelona, where he held positions in Catholic education in particular for the youth in the parish ministry and as chaplain of the religious institutes of women. In May 1950, after being biopsied, he was diagnosed with lymphoma lymphosarcoma, and died a few months later, on August 31, just 45, on the clinic he founded. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II at Loreto on September 5, 2004, during the largest gathering of Catholic Action which was held in the Marian city, and the two young members of Italian Catholic Alberto Rimini Marvelli and Pina Suriano Partinico were present. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, August 29

August 29, 2009

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon, Dominican Priest and Martyr
Híjar, Spain, March 29, 1912 – August 29, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Híjar always at Teruel in Spain, blessed Francis Monzón Romeo, Priest and Martyr of the Order of Preachers, who in the same persecution confirmed with blood for his fidelity to the Lord.

Blessed Francis Romeo Monzon was Beatified as one of the Blessed Martyrs of the Spanish Dominicans of Aragon on March 11, 2001, one of 233 Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Beatified that day by Pope John Paul II.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), August 28

August 28, 2009

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample)

Blessed Aurelio Vinalesa (José Alcaide Ample), Priest and Martyr
February 3, 1896, Viñales (Valencia), Spain-
August 28, 1938, Viñales (Valencia), Spain

Roman Martyrology: Near the village of Viñales still in the same area, blessed Aurelio (Joseph) Ample Alcaide, Order of Friars Minor Capuchin Priest and Martyr, who, during the same period in the battle for the faith brought the glorious prize.

Was born February 3, 1896 in Viñales (Valencia), third of seven children who were spouses D. Ample and Donna Manuela Vicente Alcaide. He was baptized the day after birth, ie February 4, in the parish of San Honorato bishop, and received Confirmation April 21, 1899.

“ He first studied the Seraphic Seminary of Massamagrell (Valencia). Wore the Capuchin habit in 1912, he made his temporary profession of vows on, August 10, 1913 and perpetual December 18, 1917. He was then sent to Rome to perfect himself in his studies and was ordained a priest in the Eternal City March 26, 1921 by the Archbishop of Filipos, Bishop Joseph Palica. Back in Spain, he was appointed director of the student of philosophy and theology of the Capuchins in Orihuela (Alicante), office held, and overall satisfaction with care until death.

“ “Among the faithful he enjoyed the reputation of a saint – said the priest Worker Diocesan D. Pascual Ortells – and that fame also joined the test. Was faithful observant of all the rules of St. Francis, commit itself to helping its total so that young men were perfect. “

“ During the Revolution of 1936 all the religious of the convent of Orihuela dispersed on July 13. P. Aurelio sought refuge in the family home in Viñales, in which, on 28 August, was captured by gunmen and taken to his place of death. Before being killed he urged all his comrades to die well, gave them absolution, and then added, “Cry aloud, live Christ the King.”

“ He was killed August 28, 1936. His body was interred in the cemetery of Foyos (Valencia), near where he had been killed. After the civil war, his remains were exhumed and carried into the cemetery Vinalesa September 17, 1937. He is currently buried in the chapel of the convent of the Capuchin martyrs Maddalena Massamagrell.

“ P. Aurelio retain the use within, since he was captured until death, all remaining faithful to Christ. “He kept the peace until the last moment – he says Rafael Rodrigo, the witness of his martyrdom – encouraging all of us that we were going to die. When everything was ready for execution, urges us to recite the formula of the act of contrition. So we did, and when the Servant of God was reciting the formula of a militiaman gave him two slaps. One of the militiamen said to his companion not to slap him more, because it was not worth the trouble, given the time of life we have left. The Servant of God remained unchanged and continued to injury before the acquittal until the end. As soon as the Servant of God had finished his sacred duty, a volley rang out and we fell with him all repeating the cry: ‘Long live Christ the King!’.

He was Beatified as one of the Blessed Spanish Capuchins, Martyrs of Valencia, 12 friars and 5 Poor Clares, who suffered martyrdom during the civil war and religious persecution that through their homeland in the 30s of the twentieth century. Pope John Paul II Beatified them on March 11, 2001, together with a group totaling 233 martyrs of the same persecution.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, August 27

August 27, 2009

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano

Blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, Priest and Martyr
August 27

Roman Martyrology: Along the road between the towns of Godella Bétera and in the same region in Spain, blessed Raimondo Martí Soriano, priest and martyr who shed their blood for Christ during the same persecution against the faith.On March 11, 2001, Pope John Paul II Beatified in St. Peter’s Square in Rome 233 Spanish martyrs, including the thickest cloud of witnesses of faith elevated to the glory of the altars in the course of his pontificate.

“ These numerous innocent lambs of the cause of Christ were killed out of hatred for their faith during the brutal religious persecution that characterized the Spanish Civil War in the 30s of the twentieth century. In this bloody massacre that through Spain, the number of victims over a million, affecting people of all ages and social class: bishops, priests, religious and laity of both sexes. It was well established by historians that, within this terrible massacre, anarchists and socialists-communists perpetrated a real persecution aimed at destroying the Catholic Church in Spain.

The martyrs were divided into smaller groups, based on their Archdiocese. Blessed Raimondo is part of the group known as José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia who were Decreed on Martyrs on December 18, 2000

Source:  Santi e Beati


Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, August 24

August 24, 2009

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz

Blessed Maximilian (Maksymilian) Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr
Gmina Żarnowiec, Poland, February 21, 1908 – Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942

Blessed Maksymilian Binkiewicz, Polish diocesan priest, was born in Gmina Żarnowiec (Olkusz) February 21, 1908 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 24, 1942. He was Beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) June 13, 1999 together with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp at Dachau near Munich in Germany, Monaco, blessed Maximian Binkiewicz, Priest and Martyr, who, during the war, was deported by the invading soldiers from Poland because of his faith in Christ and he died under torture and torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, August 21

August 21, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves

Blessed Salvatore Estrugo Solves, Priest and Martyr
August 21

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 others from the Archdiocese of Valencia who were victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Alberic on the territory of Valencia in Spain, blessed Savior Estrugo solves, priest and martyr, who, during the persecution endured for the love of Christ every hardship to obtain the palm of victory.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Mirone of Cizici, August 17

August 17, 2009

Saint Mirone of Cizici, Priest and Martyr
August 17
m. Cizici, 250

Saint Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who according to legend was beheaded after many torments at Cizici nell’Ellesponto under the governor Antipatro and the reigning emperor Decius.

Roman Martyrology: At Cizici in Ellesponto, in modern Turkey, St. Mirone, Priest and Martyr, who, as we passed, was beheaded after many torments under the Emperor Decius and the governor Antipatro.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya, August 15

August 15, 2009

Blessed Domenico Maria da AlborayaBlessed Domenico Maria da Alboraya (Augustine Hurtado Soler), Priest and Martyr

Alboraya (Valencia) on 28 Aug, 1872-August 15

Ordained a priest on Dec. 19, 1896. An experienced teacher, working and cartatevole, had positions of responsibility in his institute. A man of prayer and great devotee of Our Lady of Sorrows, he celebrated the Eucharist with devotion

Roman Martyrology: Always in Madrid, Blessed Domenico (Augustine) Soler Hurtado, a priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and martyr, who had witnessed Christ, received the crown of glory.

Beatified together with a group known as the Blessed Martyrs Third Spanish Capuchins dell’Addolorata, he was one of 19 religious Spaniards belonging to the Congregation of the Third Capuchins of Our Lady of Sorrows (or Amigoniani), founded by Venerable Louis Amigó y Rerrer, and a sister, also Tertiary Cappuccina, victims of religious persecution of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39).

The cause of canonization of these twenty religious martyrs was conducted at the Valencia archidiocese together with seven other cases relating to the martyrdom of so many cases of members of various religious orders and congregations. In 1993-94 was issued the decree of validity of the unified diocesan process of these cases, on 13 May. 1997 the Positio super martyria was delivered to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Albocacer da Modesto, August 13

August 13, 2009

Blessed Modesto da Albacar

Blessed Albocacer Modesto (Modesto Garcia Marti),Priest and Martyr
Modesto, Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880 – Valencia, August 13, 1936

Roman Martyrology: At the village of Albocàsser in the same region in Spain, Bl Modesto García Martí, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who during the persecution against the faith with martyrdom crowned the evangelical precept.

Fr Albocácer was born in Modesto, the diocese of Tortosa and the province of Castellón de la Plana, January 18, 1880. He was the third of seven children of a Christian family, whose parents were D. Francisco Garcia and Donna Joaquina Martí. He was baptized on January 19, 1880 in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Albocácer. As a child he entered the Seraphic Seminary of the Capuchins of the Province of Valencia in Massamagrell. He took the habit in the same convent on January 1, 1896; took his temporary vows January 3 1897 and perpetual vows on January 6, 1900. He completed his studies in philosophy and those of Orihuela to Massamagrell theology, and was ordained a priest on December 19, 1903. He lived most of his apostolic ministry as a missionary in Colombia in the Custody of Bogota. On his return to Valencia was appointed guardian for several years.

Those who knew him speak of him as a priest dedicated to apostolic preaching, spiritual exercises, spiritual direction, … which were, among others, his favorite activities. So said those who lived with him: “His field of apostolate favorite – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was preaching, spiritual exercises and the direction of souls. I heard criticism ever in its work “. He enjoyed a reputation for holiness among the faithful. “His was a peaceful temperament. His most remarkable quality – notes Mr. Daniel Garcia – was kindness. He enjoyed good a reputation among his companions of religion and among the faithful. He was loyal observant of the Franciscan Rules and Constitutions.”

At the time of the Revolution was the guardian of national Olleria (Valencia), where “the community was violently destroyed, the convent and the church destroyed by fire, the pine wood cut from the same monastery, destroyed the walls, so that everything was reduced nothing “. When communications were restored, P. Modesto went to his country and took refuge in the house of his sister Teresa, along with his brother Miguel Mosen priest, pastor of Torrembesora. For her safety he fled the farm la Masa, where he was captured by armed militiamen. P. Modesto was delivered with gentleness and humility – said Mr. Arturo Adell – and without any protest. His attitude during this period – said Sig.na Pilar Beltrán – was the total abandonment to the Lord and an exemplary life.” He was killed at four in the afternoon of August 13, near the basin of the Valley Albocácer between the farm and the Masa, about 600 meters from the farmhouse, on the same road that goes from the farm to the country. After the release of Albocácer exhumations were the remains of P. Modest and then found that his skull had been crossed from side to side by a large nail. His remains – according to Mr. Felipe Mateu were buried in a mass grave of the cemetery in the country and are currently resting in a niche of the cemetery.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 as one of 17 Blessed Spanish Capuchins of Valencia.

Source: Holy See


Blessed Mauritius Tornay, August 11

August 11, 2009

Blessed Maurizio Tornay

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, Priest and Martyr

Rosière, Switzerland, August 31, 1910 – To Thong, Tibet, August 11, 1949

Blessed Mauritius (Maurice) Tornay, professed priest of the Order of Canons Regular of St. Augustine of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bemardo “Montis Iovis”, was born in Rosière (Joint Orsières – canton of Valais), Switzerland, August 31, 1910 and died a martyr at To Thong, Tibet, on August 11, 1949. His tomb is located at the Mission Yerkalo, Tibet-China. He was beatified in Rome by Pope John Paul II on May 16, 1993.

Roman Martyrology: In the region of Tibet, Blessed Mauritius Tornay, Priest and Martyr who, canon regular of the Congregation of Saints Nicholas and Bernard of Mont Joux-announced engagement with the Gospel in China and Tibet and was killed by the enemies of Christ. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Edward Gryzmala, August 10

August 10, 2009

Blessed Edward Gryzmala

Blessed Edward (Edward) Grzymala, Priest and Martyr


Kolodziaz, Poland, September 29, 1906 – Dachau, Germany, August 10,

1940

Blessed Edward Grzymala, a diocesan priest, was born in Kolodziaz, Poland, September 29, 1906 and died in Dachau, Germany, August 10, 1940. He wasbeatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw (Poland) on June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria inGermany, Drzewiecki blessed Francis of the Congregation of the Little Work of Divine Providence, and Edoardo Grzymała, priests and martyrs, who, ofPolish origin, during the devastation of their homeland in time of war were made by their persecutors in a foreign prison and reached Christ killed in a gas chamber.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed German of Carcaixent, August 9

August 9, 2009

Blessed German of Cartaxeint

Blessed German of Carcaixent (José Maria Hernandez Garrigues) Capuchin Priest and Martyr
Carcaixent, Valencia, Spain, February 12, 1895 – 1936

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Carcaixent in Valencia in Spain, Blessed Germanus ( José Maria) Garrigues Hernández, a Priest of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin and Martyr, who, during persecution against the faith, won the tortures of body with precious death.

Father was born in Germán Carcagente (Valencia), in the bosom of a Christian family, February 12, 1895. He was baptized on his day of birth in the parish of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción of Carcagente Confirmation was received on July 22, 1912 by Bishop Athanasius Fr. Royo Soler, duly authorized by the archbishop of the diocese. In the family of D. Juan Bautista and Donna Garrigues Ana María Hernández were born eight children, three of whom became like our Capuchin, José Maria. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, August 8

August 8, 2009

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski

Blessed Vladimir (Wlodzimierz) Laskowski, Priest and Martyr
Rogoznica, Poland, January 30, 1886 – Gusen, Austria, August 8, 1940

Wlodzimierz Laskowski, a priest of the Archdiocese of Poznan, fell victim of the Nazis in their hatred of the Christian faith. On June 13, 1999, Pope John Paul II raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution. While they were beatified together, their deaths took place separately so there is not a collective memorial.

Roman Martyrology: At Gusen Germany blessed Vladimiro Laskowski, priest and martyr, who, in times of war, was deported for his faith in this prison camp and, cruelly tortured, reached the glory of martyrdom.

Source: Santi e Beati


How Long do Catholics keep a Pope?

August 7, 2009

Pope john paul IIPope John Paul II

Today I talked to someone who commented on how much he had liked Pope John Paul II but wondered why we had him so long. When I said he was one of the longest reigning Popes ever, the guy said he thought the Pope was elected every four years, just like the President of the US.

I informed him that we keep the Pope until he dies, like the Supreme Court Justices but didn’t think to mention that he lives in our hearts forever.

And chose not to mention that in some cases, we keep them longer.

PopeGregoryVIITombPope St. Gregory VII


St. Cassian, August 5

August 5, 2009

st. cassian

St. Cassian, Bishop

Roman Martyrology: At lugdunense Autun in Gaul, now France, St. Cassian, Bishop.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, August 3

August 3, 2009

Blessed Salvatore Ferrandis SeguiBlessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr,Third Spanish Capuchins
August 3

Roman Martyrology: At Alicante in Spain, followed blessed Salvatore Ferrandis Segui, Priest and Martyr, who spilled the blood of Christ during the persecution against the faith and obtained the palm of victory.

Pope John Paul II Beatified him on March 11, 2001 in St. Peter’s Square, together wtih 232 other victims of the bloody Spanish Civil War. This wide range of martyrs is divided into several subgroups according to the diocese or congregation to which they belong. The Romanum Martyrologium commemorates those blessed individually or in small groups based on the date and place of where the slaughter occurred.

Blessed Salvatore is part of the subgroup José Aparicio Sanz and 73 companions, priests and laity of the Archdiocese of Valencia.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, August 2

August 2, 2009

Blessed Francis Tomas Serer

Blessed Francesco Tomas Serer Priest and Martyr

Alicante, Spain, Oct. 11, 1911-August 2, 1936

He professed his temporary vows on September, 15, 1928 and his perpetual vows on December 21. 1933. He was Ordained a priest on May 24, 1934, spent his 2 years of ministry in the reformatory of Amurri (Alava) and Carabanchel Bajo (Madrid). He was persecuted and martyred at 24.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II on December 18, 2000, together with 17 others of his order and a layman.

Roman Martyrology: In Madrid always in Spain, Blessed Francesco Tomás Serer, a Priest of the Third Order of St. Francis of hooded Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and Martyr, in the same persecution that deserved to pay the blood of Christ.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Alex Sobaszek, August 1

August 1, 2009

Blessed Alex Sobacsek

Blessed Alessio Sobaszek Priest and Martyr
Przygodzice Wielkie, Poland, July 17 ,1895 – Dachau, Germany, August 1, 1942

Diocesan priest. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Warsaw, Poland on June 13, 1999 with 107 other Polish martyrs.

Roman Martyrology: In the prison camp near Dachau Monaco of Bavaria in Germany, Blessed Alessio Sobaszek, priest and martyr, who, of Polish birth, in time of war brutally deported by the invaders, dying for Christ under torture, defending his faith.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, July 31

July 31, 2009

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, Priest and Martyr
Izdebno, Poland, September 28, 1900 – Dachau, Germany, July 31, 1942

Michal Ozieblowski, priest of the Archdiocese of Warsaw, fell victim of the Nazis in the famous German concentration camp at Dachau. Pope John Paul II on June 13, 1999 raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution.

Roman Martyrology: Near Monaco of Bavaria in Germany in the prison camp at Dachau, Blessed Michael Oziębłowski, Priest and Martyr, who, deported to his faith in a foreign prison in Poland, his homeland, forced under an enemy of religion, brought to completion martyred under torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, July 29

July 29, 2009

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués

Blessed José Calasanz Marqués, Priest and Martyr
Huesca, November 23, 1872 – Valencia, July 29, 1936

Professed priest of the Salesian Society of Saint John Bosco, born in Azanuy (Huesca), Spain, November 23, 1872, died at the Bridge of St. Josephon the road to Valencia, Spain, July 29, 1936. He is buried at the cemetery Benimaclet in Valencia. Pope John Paul II beatified him on March 11, 2001 together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War from the Diocese of Valencia. Read the rest of this entry »


Long-lost Mosaic Seraphim Uncovered at Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia

July 25, 2009

Note: Below image is the Archangel Gabriel, not one of the newly uncovered images.

GabrielOfficial: Long-lost mosaic seraphim uncovered at Istanbul’s Haghia Sophia

SUZAN FRASER, Star Tribune

ANKARA, Turkey – Restoration workers have uncovered a well-preserved, long-hidden mosaic face of an angel at the former Byzantine cathedral of Haghia Sophia in Istanbul, an official said Friday.

The seraphim figure — one of two located on the side of a dome — had been covered up along with the building’s other Christian mosaics shortly after Constantinople — the former name for Istanbul — fell to the Ottomans in 1453 and the cathedral was turned into a mosque. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Vasil Hopko, July 23

July 23, 2009

Blessed Vasil Hopko

Blessed Bishop Vasil Hopko Greek-Catholic martyr
July 23
Hrabske (Bardejov), April 21, 1904 – Prešov (Slovakia), July 23, 1976

Born of poor family, he decided to enter the seminary in 1923. He was ordained a priest by the Greek-Catholic Bishop of Presov on February 3, 1929. He graduated in theology in 1940 he was ordained as a bishop on May 11, 1947. Between 1950 and 1964, he was jailed by the Communist regime, undergoing torture. After his release, despite the precarious state of his health, Hopko actively contributed to the renewal of the Greek-Catholic Church. He died on July 23, 1976.
Read the rest of this entry »


Saint Apollinare, July 20

July 20, 2009

Saint Apollinaire July 20JPGSaint Apollinare of Ravenna, Bishop and Martyr
July 20
ca. II-III century

Saint Apollinare, a native of Antioch, became a Bishop in the imperial city of Ravenna, perhaps instructed by the apostle St. Peter, of whom we’re told he was a disciple. He devoted himself to the work of evangelization of the Emilia-Romagna, finally to die as a martyr. The Basilica of Saint Apollinare in Class and Saint Apollinare’s New Basilica have passed to memories. His cult spread quickly, however, beyond the city limits. The pontiffs Simmaco (498-514) and Honorius I (625-638) promoted its to Rome, while the ex-king Clovis dedicated a church to him at Dijon. In Germany,his cult was probably spread by the Benedictine monasteries, and Camaldolese Avellana. A church was also dedicated to him in Bologna in the Palazzo del Podestà, but since it was demolished in 1250, Cardinal Lambertini dedicated an altar in the cathedral town. Saint Apollinare is considered the patron saint of the city where he was the first pastor, and the region Emilia-Romagna. Read the rest of this entry »


Who was Buried in the Apostle Paul’s Tomb?

June 29, 2009

ap-Apostle-Paul-tomb-Rome-195eng29jun09Tomb believed to be the Apostle Paul’s

The Vatican announced, at the close of the Pauline year, that analysis on bones buried in what is believed to be the tomb of the Apostle Paul, indicates the bones are from the proper time period.

You’ve got to love Catholicism; the Vatican finds all kinds of things located where tradition has put them.

Oldest St. PaulOldest portrait of St. Paul

In addition, the Vatican announced the finding of a 4th century portrait of St. Paul, which is the oldest known image of the saint.

Grace from God in this Pauline year.


A Non-Mosaic Torah

November 21, 2008
“From that tree you shall not eat; the moment you eat from it you are surely doomed to die.”  Of course God was not lying to Adam.  The price for sin is blood.  When Paul said, “According to the law almost everything is purified by blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness,” he was not presenting new information to the Jews, he was simply emphasizing what they already knew to be true.  Getting there was a long road though.  The first time God purified the world was in Noah’s Flood.  Shortly after Noah’s flood God brought Abram into the world and promised him to make a great nation of him because of his faith.  Three generations later He saved Abraham’s family from starvation by placing one of the children in a position of authority in Egypt, where he had knowledge of the coming famine and the prudence and position to prepare for it.  Four hundred years later the Israelites needed salvation from their gracious hosts of old.  With Read the rest of this entry »

The Kingdom of Heaven

September 21, 2008

I love the movie Kingdom of Heaven. It combines my three favorite subjects in the whole world: the Church; the military and history. I was thinking about that movie and modern popular culture in America this past weekend. For all of my love of the movie, there are things about it that just drive me up the wall. My opinion is that if you are going to make a movie based on historical events then get the history right! The producers got so much of it right that it would be easy to overlook what they got wrong. The costumes were right, the major events were (for the most part) right, the weapons were right, the tactics were right and the characters were (mostly) right.

One thing I found particularly offensive was the portrayal of the monastic orders of knights. A major blunder was that none of the characters portrayed as Templar knights were actually Templar knights in real life. Teutonic knights were portrayed as little more than thugs and henchmen better suited to make an appearance in a mob movie. Read the rest of this entry »


The Gospel of Matthew

April 21, 2008

A vein of theology infecting the Church today makes an attempt to discern who the “real” authors of the Gospels were and when they wrote.  One of the claims is that the Gospel of Matthew, long considered to be the first Gospel (by Matthew, hence the name), was actually written after 70 AD by an author who was not a disciple of Jesus.  This claim is based on the facts that Matthew and Mark are so similar to each other that one must have been copied from the other and the inclusion of the predicted destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in the Gospel of Matthew which did occur in 70 AD.

Papias, bishop of Heirapolis, who was a student of the Apostle John and a companion of Polycarp (also a student of John), wrote that Matthew was the first to record a Gospel in writing, which he did for the Israelites in the Hebrew language.  Irenaeus, bishop of Lyon, wrote “Against Heresies” at the end of the Second Century.  To the best of my knowledge that has never been disputed.  In it he said:

Matthew published his gospel among the Hebrews in their own tongue, when Peter and Paul were preaching the Gospel in Rome and founding the church there.  After their departure Mark, the disciple and interpreter of Peter, himself handed down to us in writing the substance of Peter’s preaching.  Luke, the follower of Paul, set down in a book the gospel preached by his teacher.  Then John, the disciple of the Lord, who also leaned on his breast, himself produced his gospel, while he was living at Ephesus in Asia.

Read the rest of this entry »


Catholic Answers tract on “Can Dogma Develop?”

April 17, 2008

Can Dogma Develop?

The opening verse of the book of Hebrews tells us that “[i]n many and various ways God spoke of old to our fathers by the prophets.” This was done fragmentarily, under various figures and symbols. Man was not given religious truth as though from a Scholastic theologian, nicely laid out and fully indexed. Doctrines had to be thought out, lived out in the liturgical life of the Church, even pieced together by the Fathers and ecumenical councils. In this way, the Church has gained an ever-deepening understanding of the deposit of faith that had been “once for all delivered” to it by Christ and the apostles (cf. Jude 3). Read the rest of this entry »


Flight Into Egypt

April 11, 2008

 

There has always been an image in my mind of St. Joseph leading a donkey which bears the Blessed Virgin carrying the Baby Jesus on a long walk through the wilderness to a tiny Egyptian village in the middle of the desert to wait out the storm of King Herod’s wrath. I never found that fully satisfying though. There are only two references to the Holy Family’s flight to Egypt that I am aware of in Holy Scripture and I can not ever recall hearing any Catholic theologian speak extensively on the issue. In essence the trip is in an intellectual and historical black out for me, but none the less interesting. Read the rest of this entry »


Lightbringers – The Emissaries of Jahbulon

April 9, 2008

There is a video posted on the internet called “Lightbringers – The Emissaries of Jahbulon” which puts out fallacious information. It can be found here http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7447140689352016786. Whatever it says about Freemasonry is really of no consequence to me. My contention is its attempt to connect the Freemasons to the Templar Knights. There is no supporting evidence to lead to such a conclusion; in fact the verdict of history would show the opposite.

There are three main claims by the producers of this video to connect the Freemasons to the Templar Knights. It claims several knights escaped arrest and fled to Scotland, continued to practice “secret rites,” then founded the order of Freemasonry in Scotland. Only one claim is true – several knights and sargeants did escape to Scotland because their nobles were strong supporters of the Order of the Templar Knights. Read the rest of this entry »


Why Rome?

April 8, 2008

The phrase “in the fullness of time” is something worth pondering. As my knowledge and understanding of history has grown so has my consideration of  just what in “the fullness of time” means.

 The first real revolutionary change was when I began to learn more about Alexandria, Egypt. I thought about the implication the city had on the time Jesus’ birth. The major change was that I began to pay much more attention to the geopolitical situation and factoring it into God’s plan for the world.

In the past year and a half I read a tremendous amount about Rome, just for general knowledge at first, but later for more specific reasons. I have always liked Rome for several reasons. Read the rest of this entry »


March 25: Blessed Omeljan Kovc, Greek Catholic Martyr & Righteous Among The Nations

March 25, 2008
blessed-omeljan-kovc.jpg
Blessed Omeljan Kovc, 1884-1944
Greek Catholic Martyr & Righteous Among The Nations

from www.vatican.va: “The Servant of God Fr Emilian Kovch was born on 20 August 1884, near Kosiv. In 1911, after graduating from the College of Sts Sergius and Bacchus in Rome, he was ordained to the priesthood. In the spring of 1943, he was arrested by the Gestapo for aiding Jews. On 25 March 1944 he was burned to death in the ovens of the Majdanek Nazi death camp. On 9 September 1999 he was honoured with the title “Righteous Ukrainian” by the Jewish Council of Ukraine.”