November 3: Saint Pietro Francesco Neron

Pietro Francesco NERON, Priest and Martyr

Martyred November 3, 1860

One of 50 martyrs from the time of the Emperor Tu Duc (1847-1883), in the fortress of Xa Doai, in Tonkin, Pietro Francesco Neron, Priest of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris, and martyr, who under the Emperor Tu Duc, lived for three months locked in a small cage, appallingly beaten, starved for three weeks and ultimately beheaded.

THE CHURCH IN VIETNAM fertilized by the blood of martyrs

The work of evangelization, undertaken from the beginning of the sixteenth century, then established in the first two Apostolic Vicariate of the North (Dang-Ngoại) and South (-Dang Trong) in 1659, has experienced over the centuries a admirable development. At the moment, the diocese there were 25 (10 North, 6 and 9 at the South). The Vietnamese Catholic hierarchy was erected by Pope John XXIII on 24 November 1960.

This result is due to the fact that the early years of evangelization, the seed of the Faith has been involved in the land Vietnamese blood poured plenty of Martyrs, both clergy missionary of the local clergy and Christian people of Viet Nam. All bore all the fatigues of the apostolic work and have one heart, also faced death to bear witness to the Gospel truth. The religious history of the Church of Viet Nam recorded that there were a total of 53 decrees signed by the Lords and TRINH NGUYEN and emperors, which for three centuries XVII, XVIII, XIX: exactly 261 years (16251886 ), Enacted against Christians persecuted one more violent than the other. There are about 130,000 victims fell across the territory of Viet Nam.

Over the centuries, these martyrs of the faith were buried in a way anonymous, but their memory is still alive in the minds of the Catholic community. From the early twentieth century, in this crowd of heroes, 117 people – the tests have been most cruel – have been selected and elevated to the honors of the altars by the Holy See in 4 series of beatifications:

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