Blessed Jan Beyzym, October 2

October 2, 2010

Blessed Jan BezymBlessed Jan Beyzym

Beyzymy Wielkie, Volhynia, 15 May 1850 – Marana, Madagascar, October 2, 1912

The Servant of God Father John Beyzym was born in Beyzymy Wielkie in Volhynia May 15, 1850.  After finishing high school in Kiev, he entered the novitiate of the Jesuits in Stara Wieś near Brzozów.  Received Holy Orders in Krakow from the hands of Bishop Albin Dunajewski in 1881. For many years he was an educator and patron of young people in the colleges of the Society of Christ in Tarnopol and Chyrow. Read the rest of this entry »


Father Jacques Marqette, May 18

May 18, 2010

Father Marquette preachingFather Jacques Marquette

Laon, France, June 1o, 1637 – May 18, 1675, Ludington, MI

Father Jacques Marquette SJ, sometimes known as Pere Marquette, was a French missionary who founded Michigan’s first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first non-Native Americans to see and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

Jacques Marquette was born in Laon, France, on June 1, 1637 and joined the Society of Jesus at age seventeen. After working and teaching in France for several years, he was dispatched to Quebec in 1666 to preach to the Native Americans, where he showed great proficiency in the local languages, especially Huron. In 1668 Father Marquette (French: Père Marquette) was redeployed by his superiors to missions farther up the St. Lawrence River in the western Great Lakes. He worked at Sault Ste. Marie and at the Mission of the Holy Spirit in La Pointe, on Lake Superior, near the present-day city of Ashland, Wisconsin. Here, he came into contact with members of the Illinois tribes, who told him of the existence of the Mississippi River and invited him to come teach further south. Because of wars between the Hurons at La Pointe and the neighboring Dakota people, however, Father Marquette had to relocate to the Straits of Mackinac; he informed his superiors about the rumored river and requested permission to explore it.

Leave was granted, and in 1673, Marquette was joined by Louis Joliet, a French Canadian explorer. They departed from St. Ignace on May 17, with two canoes and five other voyageurs of French-Indian ancestry. They followed Lake Michigan to the Bay of Green Bay and up the Fox River. From there, they portaged to the Wisconsin River, which they were told led to the river they sought. On June 17, they entered the Mississippi near Prairie du Chien.

The Joliet-Marquette expedition traveled to within 435 miles (700 km) of the Gulf of Mexico but turned back at the mouth of the Arkansas River. By this point they had encountered several natives carrying European trinkets, and they feared an encounter with explorers or colonists from Spain.[2] They followed the Mississippi back to the mouth of the Illinois River, which they learned from local natives was a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. They returned to Lake Michigan near the location of modern-day Chicago. Marquette stopped at the mission of St. Francis Xavier in Green Bay in September, while Joliet returned to Quebec to relate the news of their discoveries.

Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. In the spring of 1675, the missionary again paddled westward and celebrated a public Mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery picked up during the Mississippi expedition, however, had sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.

The Michigan Historical Marker at this location reads:

Father Marquette Memorial Father Jacques Marquette, the great Jesuit missionary and explorer, died and was buried by two French companions somewhere along the Lake Michigan shore on May 18, 1675. He had been returning to his mission at St. Ignace which he had left in 1673 to go exploring in the Mississippi country. The exact location of his death has long been a subject of controversy. A spot close to the southeast slope of this hill, near the ancient outlet of the Pere Marquette River, corresponds with the death site as located by early French accounts and maps and a constant tradition of the past. Marquette’s remains were reburied at St. Ignace in 1677. ”

His grave is now located at what is currently the Ojibway Museum on State Street in downtown St. Ignace. Father Marquette is memorialized in several towns and rivers that bear his name (such as Marquette, Michigan), as well as the Father Marquette National Memorial near St. Ignace. Pere Marquette State Park near Grafton, Illinois, is located at the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and is the site where Indians of the Illini Confederation showed Marquette a faster return route to the Great Lakes.

SOURCE


Saint Alexander Briant, December 1

December 1, 2009

Saint Alexander Briant, Jesuit Priest and Martyr

Somerset, England, about 1556 – Tyburn, London, December 1, 1581

Roman Martyrology: In London, England, Saint Edmund Campion, Rodolfo Sherwin and Alexander Briant, priests and martyrs under Queen Elizabeth I, celebrated for their ingenuity and strength in faith. Edmund, who from an early age he professed the Catholic faith, admitted into the Society of Jesus in Rome and was ordained priest in Prague, he returned home, where, for their efforts in comforting the souls of the faithful with his words and his writings , was killed, after many torments, at Tyburn. With him suffered the same torments the saints Rudolph and Alexander, the second of which he obtained in prison to be admitted into the Society of Jesus. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Michael Augustin Pro, November 23

November 23, 2009

Blessed Miguel Augustin Pro Jesuit Martyr
November 23
Guadeloupe, January 13, 1891 – Mexico City, November 23, 1927


Born in Guadeloupe in 1891, he entered the Society of Jesus in 1911, after two of his sisters had taken the veil. He studied in Nicaragua, Spain and Belgium, where he was ordained a priest in 1925. Back in Mexico, he carried out his mission in a period of persecution against the Church. In 1927 he was wrongly accused of being part of a plot to kill a general candidate for president. After a farcical trial, he was shot. To his funeral, defying prohibitions, rushed 20 thousand people. He was beatified on September 25, 1988 by Pope John Paul II, together with other Mexican Martyrs of Persecution. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Julian Nakaura, October 21

October 21, 2009

Blessed Julian Nakura

Blessed Julian Nakaura, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Nakaura, Japan, ca. 1567 – Nishizaki, Japan, October 21, 1633

Jesuit Priest, native of Japan, Julian Nakaura was martyred in his homeland in the context of fierce waves of persecution against Christians. Following a rapid process started with the green light by the Holy See granted on 2 September 1994, his Martrydom was recognized on July 1, 2007 and he was beatified on November 24, 2008, during the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI, together with 187 other Japanese Martyrs.

Source: Santi e Beati


Saint Isaac Jogues, October 18

October 19, 2009

Saint Isaac Jogues

Saint Isaac Jogues, Priest and Martyr
Orléans, France, January 10, 1607 – Ossernenon, Canada, October 18, 1646

He was born January 10, 1607 at Orleans in France. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and in 1636, after receiving ordination, he was sent to North America to evangelize indigenous peoples. Hhe went to the Great Lakes, where he lived for six years always exposed to various dangers. In 1642, Isaac Jogues, Rene Goupil and coadjutor with the forty Hurons, fell into an ambush stretched by the Iroquois. They were all tortured and savagely mutilated. The night they put them on the floor, naked and chained, and pour over them hot coals and ashes. Jogues was transferred to Albany, where the merchants Dutch Calvinists helped him to escape. He returned to France. But in 1644 the missionary departed for Canada. Two years later he was shot in the neck and decapitated. There were eight Jesuit Martyrs in North America, all Beatified in 1925 and Canonized in 1930 by Pope Pius XI.

Roman Martyrology: In the village of Ossernenon in Canada, the passion of St. Isaac Jogues, Jesuit Priest and Martyr, who was enslaved by some pagans and had his fingers mutilated, then died with his head smashed by a blow of the ax.

More information about St. Isaac may be found here.

Source: Santi e Beati


Jean-Nicolas Cordier, September 30

September 30, 2009

Martyr Palm Fronds

Blessed Jean-Nicolas Cordier, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Saint-André, France, December 3, 1710 – Rochefort, France, September 30, 1794


Roman Martyrology: On the French coast in the sea off Rochefort, Blessed John Nicholas Cordier, Priest and Martyr who, after the abolition of the Society of Jesus carried out his priestly ministry in the territory of Verdun, until, during the French Revolution, threw for priest in a galley at anchor, died of diseased lethal starvation. Read the rest of this entry »


St. Stephen Pongracz, September 7

September 7, 2009

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice

St. Stephen Pongracz of Kosice, Jesuit and Martyr
Alvincz, Romania, around 1582 – Kosice, Slovakia, September 7, 1619

Roman Martyrology: In the Carpathian mountains, in Košice, Slovakia today, holy martyr Stephen Pongracz, priest of the Society of Jesus, could not be lead to deny their Catholic faith by hunger, nor the torture of the wheel and fire.

Scion of the Hungarian nobility, he was born in 1582 in the castle Alvincz in Transylvania. After classical studies in his native land and in the Jesuit College in Cluj (Romania today) he entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus in Brno, in 1602. Then he continued his studies in philosophy and theology in Prague to Graz Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

August 19, 2009

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, August 19

Blessed Thomas Sitjar Fortiá, Jesuit Priest and Martyr
Gerona, Spain, March 21, 1866 – Gandia, Spain, August 19, 1936

Father Tomás Sitjar Forti, professed Priest of the Society of Jesus, was born in the city of Gerona and joined the Society in 1880. He was Rector of the Novitiate and Superior of the Residence of Gandía. He was assassinated in Gandía Bianca Cruz at August 19, 1936 at the age of 70 years.

He was Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 other victims of the Spanish Civil War.

Roman Martyrology: In the city of Gandía in the same territory, Blessed Thomas Sitjar Forti, a priest of the Society of Jesus and Martyr, who scattered in the same persecution for Christ his blood.

Source: Santi e Beati


St John Lloyd, July 22

July 22, 2009

Saint John Lloyd

St John Lloyd Priest and Martyr
July 22
+ Cardiff, Wales, 22 July 1679

Roman Martyrology: At Cardiff, Wales, Saint John Lloyd, priest and martyr, who under King Charles II was hanged for having exercised the priesthood in his homeland.

He was a native of Brecknockshire and belonged to an ancient Welsh family, very little information is available about his life. We do know that he entered the English College in Valladolid, Spain, in1649, under the fictitious name of Floyd, where he received the sacred order on July 7, 1653 (cf. Bnglish Registers of the College at Valladolid 11589-1862, ed. E. Henson, London 1930, p. 164). He studied philosophy and theology, and was immediately launched on a mission to England, so he returned on April 17, 1654, going to his native Wales, whhere, for almost twenty-five years he continued his activities. We don’t have much information abou his missionary work or the circumstances of his capture, which occurred on the end of 1678 in the house of Turberville at Penllyne in the county of Glamorgan.

St. John Lloyd is one of the many victims of the merciless persecution caused by the alleged Papist plot conceived by the evil English adventurer Titus Oates. Locked in a secret castle of Cardano for over five months before the persecutors were able to induce someone to testify against him, he was finally tried on May 5, 1679, and declared guilty of high treason to be ordained a priest abroad and have practiced at home the functions of the ministry against the prohibition of the law then in force, thus condemned to death by hanging and subsequent rendering. The execution of the sentence, however, was held over two and a half months later, in Cardiff on July 22, 1679. Before being executed, Saint John Lloyd, exposed the real reasons for their deaths in a short speech, the text of which is reported by R. Challoner (see op. Cit.).

Beatified by Pope Pius XI on 15 December. 1929 (cf. AAS, XXII [1930], p. 18, n. CXLVI), St. John Lloyd is commemorated July 22, together with the Jesuit Priest, Philip Evans who was captured shortly before he was and met the same fate.

Canononized on October 29, 1970 by Pope Paul VI, as one of 40 Martyrs of England and Wales.

Source: Santi e Beati


Peter Kasui Kibe, July 4

July 4, 2009

peterkibe

Peter Kasui Kibe, Priest and Martyr

Oita, Kyushu, 1587-Tokyo, July 4, 1639

He is called “The man who walked the globe,” because of his remarkable journey along the arduous Silk Road in the 16th century in his quest of ordination to the priesthood.

His statue stands in Oita, Kyushu, where he was born in 1587. His features are strong, with eyes fixed toward his one goal of becoming a priest to serve his God and church, and a determination etched on his face and in his stance. They convey the strength and conviction of a true man of God, who was willing to undergo all hardship and disappointment and years of waiting, only to end in final torture and martyrdom. Read the rest of this entry »


Father Thomas M. King, RIP

June 28, 2009

Father Thomas M. KingFather Thomas Mulvihill King

May 9, 1929, Pittsburgh-June 23, 2009, Washington, D.C.

By Rebekah Davis

Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Thomas M. King, 80, a Jesuit priest and Georgetown University theology professor who blessed the film crew and sets for the 1973 movie “The Exorcist,” died June 23 at his home in Washington after an apparent heart attack. Read the rest of this entry »


Fr. Joseph Gelineau, SJ, dead at 87

August 11, 2008

If you are Catholic, over 60 and into liturgical music, you will know his name and remember his psalm tones which were all the rage in the early 60′s. His psalm tones were much influenced by Gregorian chant, had simple, poignant phrasing typically in a minor tone conveying an often sad-sweet, sublime mood appropriate to the ancient liturgy but also modern. His later chants written for the Taize community were much brighter in spirit and reached several generations of European youth seeking access to the contemplative through music. Read the rest of this entry »


May 31: Blessed Nicolas Barrè

May 31, 2008

Blessed Nicolas Barrè, 1621 – 1686 Read the rest of this entry »


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