8 years on I am wondering…

February 9, 2014

Has LutherPunk become Catholic yet?

Idle Ramblings of the LutherPunk

http://lutherpunk.blogspot.com/2007/02/tattoo-update.html

Friday, February 09, 2007

Tattoo Update

Shots from today’s work.

This is the cap piece on the left arm:

This is the back of the lower arm:


Marian Prayer Of Saint Gregory Of Narek (A.D. 1010)

November 12, 2013
MARIAN PRAYER OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAREK (A.D. 1010)

Assist me by the wings of your prayers,
O you who are called the Mother of the living,
so that on my exit from this valley of tears
I may be able to advance without torment
to the dwelling of life
that has been prepared for us
to lighten the end of a life burdened by my iniquity.

Healer of the sorrows of Eve,
change my day of anguish into a feast of gladness.
Be my Advocate,
ask and supplicate.
For as I believe in your inexpressible purity,
so do I also believe in
the good reception that is given to your word.

O you who are blessed among women,
help me with your tears
for I am in danger.
Bend the knee to obtain my reconciliation,
O Mother of God.

Be solicitous for me for I am miserable, Read the rest of this entry »


Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins

September 3, 2013

 Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of SinsGuide for
Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins 

  SOURCE: http://www.scborromeo.org/confess.htm

 

6 STEPS FOR A GOOD CONFESSION

  1. Examine your conscience – what sins have you committed since your last good confession.
  2. Be sincerely sorry for your sins.
  3. Confess your sins to the priest.
  4. Make certain that you confess all your mortal sins and the number of them.
  5. After your confession, do the penance the priest gives to you.
  6. Pray daily for the strength to avoid the occasion of sin, especially for those sins you were just absolved from.

 

ACT OF CONTRITIONO my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended You, and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of Heaven and the pains of Hell, but most of all because they offend You, my God, Who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
Amen.

 


 

FIRST COMMANDMENT
“I am the Lord your God. You shall not have strange gods before Me.” (Ex 20:2,3)
 


For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

August 16, 2013

For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

No one who sings of Her rosary should be forgotten in death. Say one Hail Mary for Elvis.

See also: Roman Miscellany: Five Catholic Facts About Elvis


Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

July 10, 2013

Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

Visit The Crescat and wish her well!


A Father Z Favorite: Saint Gianna Molla

April 28, 2013

Saint Gianna Molla

28 April 2008

Prepare to be amazed! The 2nd miracle of St. Gianna Molla

CATEGORY: SESSIUNCULUM — Fr. John Zuhlsdorf @ 3:54 pm

I have posted this before, but it seemed appropriate to repost it today, the anniversary of the death of St. Gianna Molla in great year of 1962.  It is her feast day today.  This is one of the saints of our time whom I would like to see included in an updated version of the traditional Roman calendar, which could stand some touching up, frankly.

In 2005 I wrote a piece in the Catholic Online Forum on the 2nd miracle through the intercession of St. Gianna. 

I reproduce it here, somewhat edited, on her feast day.  The account of this miracle gave me shivers.  I had to share it.  Recently we heard news about a possible miracle for Ven. John Henry Newman and the process for the miracle at the Congregation (here and especially here).  Sometimes we don’t get many details about what these miracles are all about.

You perhaps can fall into wondering, “Was it really all that unusual?

You decide.

Here is my original post.  I wrote this when I was pretty much thinking only in Italian, so if it sounds odd here and there, that is why:

Since I have just recently finished over 100 hours of training at the Congregation for Causes of Saints concerning the history, theology and juridial dimensions of causes of beatification and canonization (investigating the life, heroic virtues, martyrdom, reputation of holiness, reputation of martyrdom, miracles, etc.), I figured I should put some of that training to use and occasionally produce some of it here with some comments that might be of use to others. After all, what training I get isn’t just for me: it has to be for the whole Church or it is worth only the cost of the parchment.

We had the chance to learn from and question the officials of the Congregation, the experts who collaborate with it, and the physicians and historians who are experts consultants. We had lectures from the Prefect, Secretary and Under-Secretary, the Promotor of the Faith (so-called “Devil’s Advocate” is a misnomer, really) and the Relator General. We had tours of the archives and attended the proceedings of the opening of a cause in the Roman phase. Abundant materials were provided and we were, naturally, allowed then to be thoroughly tested on them.

Going into the course I was not sure what to expect, but I brought a certain measure of sceptism about some things I had heard (mostly due to faulty and insufficient information, I see now). I heard stories of lives and of miracles which left me nearly with my jaw on the table as I listened and saw the documentation.

This was a privilege which for the rest of my priesthood will affect how I can help other people understand things about the life of grace in a way I could Read the rest of this entry »


5 years ago: Paola Brenda sacrifices life for “gift of motherhood, the gift of having children

April 8, 2013

Paola Brenda sacrifices life for “gift of motherhood, the gift of having children”

By Michael Baggot

PIEVE DI SOLIGO, Italy, May 1, 2008 (LifeSiteNews.com) – In an act of sacrifice comparable to that of pro-life patroness St. Gianna Beretta Molla, Italian mother Paola Breda recently died after having declined potentially life-saving cancer treatment that could have harmed her unborn child.

Breda was diagnosed with breast cancer six months into her pregnancy with her child Nicola, but postponed treatment until after Nicola’s birth.

During her funeral, Vittorio Veneto Bishop Corrado Pizziolo called Breda an exemplification of Jesus Christ’s Gospel call “to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.”

“What Jesus did – the Gospel which He lived for us – this is what we see carried out in the life of our sister,” said the Bishop according to the Italian newspaper Avvenire.

Father Giuseppe Nadal told Radio Vaticana that Breda was disappointed that she and her husband Loris Amodei were unable to have a child until a decade into their marriage.

Both Breda’s first child, Illaria, and her second child, Nicola, brought their mother great joy, said the priest. Fr. Nadal also recounted a teary-eyed Breda coming to him during her second pregnancy.

“‘I’ve been diagnosed with cancer, and they are suggesting chemotherapy, but that would hurt the baby. I absolutely don’t want that, because I always asked for the gift of motherhood, the gift of having children,” said Breda.

St. Molla was a Milanese pediatric doctor pregnant with her fourth child when she learned of a fibroma in her uterus and declined either the abortion or complete hysterectomy that would have saved her life.

Before surgery to rescue her unborn child, St. Molla told doctors, “If you must decide between me and the child, do not hesitate: choose the child – I insist on it. Save him.”

Please pray for the repose of the soul of Paola Breda.


10 YEARS LATER: Pat Buchan – “An index of Catholicism’s decline”

December 11, 2012
An index of Catholicism’s decline



Posted: December 11, 2002
1:00 am Eastern 

By Patrick J. Buchanan
© 2008 Creators Syndicate, Inc.

 

As the Watergate scandal of 1973-1974 diverted attention from the far greater tragedy unfolding in Southeast Asia, so, too, the scandal of predator-priests now afflicting the Catholic Church may be covering up a far greater calamity.

Thirty-seven years after the end of the only church council of the 20th century, the jury has come in with its verdict: Vatican II appears to have been an unrelieved disaster for Roman Catholicism.

Liars may figure, but figures do not lie. Kenneth C. Jones of St. Louis has pulled together a slim volume of statistics he has titled Index of Leading Catholic Indicators: The Church Since Vatican II.

His findings make prophets of Catholic traditionalists who warned that Vatican II would prove a blunder of historic dimensions, and those same findings expose as foolish and naive those who believed a council could reconcile Catholicism and modernity. When Pope John XXIII threw open the windows of the church, all the poisonous vapors of modernity entered, along with the Devil himself.

Here are Jones’ grim statistics of Catholicism’s decline:

     

  • Priests. While the number of priests in the United States more than doubled to 58,000, between 1930 and 1965, since then that number has fallen to 45,000. By 2020, there will be only 31,000 priests left, and more than half of these priests will be over 70. 
  • Ordinations. In 1965, 1,575 new priests were ordained in the United States. In 2002, the number was 450. In 1965, only 1 percent of U.S. parishes were without a priest. Today, there are 3,000 priestless parishes, 15 percent of all U.S. parishes. 
  • Seminarians. Between 1965 and 2002, the number of seminarians dropped from 49,000 to 4,700, a decline of over 90 percent. Two-thirds of the 600 seminaries that were operating in 1965 have now closed. 
  • Sisters. In 1965, there were 180,000 Catholic nuns. By 2002, that had fallen to 75,000 and the average age of a Catholic nun is today 68. In 1965, there were 104,000 teaching nuns. Today, there are 8,200, a decline of 94 percent since the end of Vatican II. 
  • Religious Orders. For religious orders in America, the end is in sight. In 1965, 3,559 young men were studying to become Jesuit priests. In 2000, the figure was 389. With the Christian Brothers, the situation is even more dire. Their number has shrunk by two-thirds, with the number of seminarians falling 99 percent. In 1965, there were 912 seminarians in the Christian Brothers. In 2000, there were only seven. The number of young men studying to become Franciscan and Redemptorist priests fell from 3,379 in 1965 to 84 in 2000. 
  • Catholic schools. Almost half of all Catholic high schools in the United States have closed since 1965. The student population has fallen from 700,000 to 386,000. Parochial schools suffered an even greater decline. Some 4,000 have disappeared, and the number of pupils attending has fallen below 2 million – from 4.5 million.

Though the number of U.S. Catholics has risen by 20 million since 1965, Jones’ statistics show that the power of Catholic belief and devotion to the Faith are not nearly what they were.

     

  • Catholic Marriage. Catholic marriages have fallen in number by one-third since 1965, while the annual number of annulments has soared from 338 in 1968 to 50,000 in 2002. 
  • Attendance at Mass. A 1958 Gallup Poll reported that three in four Catholics attended church on Sundays. A recent study by the University of Notre Dame found that only one in four now attend. 
  • Only 10 percent of lay religious teachers now accept church teaching on contraception. Fifty-three percent believe a Catholic can have an abortion and remain a good Catholic. Sixty-five percent believe that Catholics may divorce and remarry. Seventy-seven percent believe one can be a good Catholic without going to mass on Sundays. By one New York Times poll, 70 percent of all Catholics in the age group 18 to 44 believe the Eucharist is merely a “symbolic reminder” of Jesus.

At the opening of Vatican II, reformers were all the rage. They were going to lead us out of our Catholic ghettos by altering the liturgy, rewriting the Bible and missals, abandoning the old traditions, making us more ecumenical, and engaging the world. And their legacy?

Four decades of devastation wrought upon the church, and the final disgrace of a hierarchy that lacked the moral courage of the Boy Scouts to keep the perverts out of the seminaries, and throw them out of the rectories and schools of Holy Mother Church.

Through the papacy of Pius XII, the church resisted the clamor to accommodate itself to the world and remained a moral beacon to mankind. Since Vatican II, the church has sought to meet the world halfway.

Jones’ statistics tell us the price of appeasement.

SOURCE: http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=29948

 

U.S. Data 1965 1975 1985 1995 2000 2005 2007
Diocesan priests 35,925 36,005 35,052 32,349 30,607 28,702 27,971
Religious priests 22,707 22,904 22,265 16,705 15,092 14,137 13,478
Total priests 58,632 58,909 57,317 49,054 45,699 42,839 41,449
Priestly ordinations 994 771 533 511 442 454 456
Graduate-level seminarians 8,325 5,279 4,063 3,172 3,474 3,308 3,274
Permanent deacons –  898 7,204 10,932 12,378 14,574 15,409
Religious brothers 12,271 8,625 7,544 6,535 5,662 5,451 5,015
Religious sisters 179,954 135,225 115,386 90,809 79,814 68,634 63,699
Parishes 17,637 18,515 19,244 19,331 19,236 18,891 18,634
Without a resident priest pastor
549 702 1,051 2,161 2,843 3,251 3,238
Catholic population 45.6m 48.7m 52.3m 57.4m 59.9m 64.8m 64.4m
Percent of U.S. population 24% 23% 23% 23% 22% 23% 22%
Catholic elementary schools


6,979
6,923
6,574
6,288
Students in Catholic elementary schools


1.991m
2.013m
1.779m
1.697m
Catholic secondary schools


1,238
1,221
1,225
1,210
Students in Catholic secondary schools


614,571
639,954
640,952
623,527

Marian Prayer Of Saint Gregory Of Narek (A.D. 1010)

November 12, 2012
MARIAN PRAYER OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAREK (A.D. 1010)

Assist me by the wings of your prayers,
O you who are called the Mother of the living,
so that on my exit from this valley of tears
I may be able to advance without torment
to the dwelling of life
that has been prepared for us
to lighten the end of a life burdened by my iniquity.

Healer of the sorrows of Eve,
change my day of anguish into a feast of gladness.
Be my Advocate,
ask and supplicate.
For as I believe in your inexpressible purity,
so do I also believe in
the good reception that is given to your word.

O you who are blessed among women,
help me with your tears
for I am in danger.
Bend the knee to obtain my reconciliation,
O Mother of God.

Be solicitous for me for I am miserable, Read the rest of this entry »


DID THE CHURCH CHANGE THE SABBATH?

November 10, 2012


For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

August 16, 2012

For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

No one who sings of Her rosary should be forgotten in death. Say one Hail Mary for Elvis.

See also: Roman Miscellany: Five Catholic Facts About Elvis


The 10th Anniversary Of The Murder Of Sister Cecilia Moshi Hanna

August 15, 2012

For the repose of the soul of the hand maid of God, Cecelia.On August 15, 2002 three armed assailants entered the Sacred Heart of Jesus Monastery in Baghdad Iraq and found a solitary Assyrian nun preparing to quietly retire to her room. Read the rest of this entry »


Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins

August 3, 2012

 Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of SinsGuide for
Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins 

  SOURCE: http://www.scborromeo.org/confess.htm

 

6 STEPS FOR A GOOD CONFESSION

  1. Examine your conscience – what sins have you committed since your last good confession.
  2. Be sincerely sorry for your sins.
  3. Confess your sins to the priest.
  4. Make certain that you confess all your mortal sins and the number of them.
  5. After your confession, do the penance the priest gives to you.
  6. Pray daily for the strength to avoid the occasion of sin, especially for those sins you were just absolved from.

 

ACT OF CONTRITIONO my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended You, and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of Heaven and the pains of Hell, but most of all because they offend You, my God, Who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
Amen.

 


 

FIRST COMMANDMENT
“I am the Lord your God. You shall not have strange gods before Me.” (Ex 20:2,3)
 


Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

July 11, 2012

Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

Visit The Crescat and wish her well!

 
 

 

May 1: Saint Joseph The Worker

May 1, 2012


March 19: Saint Joseph

March 19, 2012


Marian Prayer Of Saint Gregory Of Narek (A.D. 1010)

November 12, 2011
MARIAN PRAYER OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAREK (A.D. 1010)

Assist me by the wings of your prayers,
O you who are called the Mother of the living,
so that on my exit from this valley of tears
I may be able to advance without torment
to the dwelling of life
that has been prepared for us
to lighten the end of a life burdened by my iniquity.

Healer of the sorrows of Eve,
change my day of anguish into a feast of gladness.
Be my Advocate,
ask and supplicate.
For as I believe in your inexpressible purity,
so do I also believe in
the good reception that is given to your word.

O you who are blessed among women,
help me with your tears
for I am in danger.
Bend the knee to obtain my reconciliation,
O Mother of God.

Be solicitous for me for I am miserable, Read the rest of this entry »


For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

August 16, 2011

For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

No one who sings of Her rosary should be forgotten in death. Say one Hail Mary for Elvis.

See also: Roman Miscellany: Five Catholic Facts About Elvis


Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

July 10, 2011

Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

Visit The Crescat and wish her well!

 

 
 

Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins

July 3, 2011

 Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of SinsGuide for
Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins 

  SOURCE: http://www.scborromeo.org/confess.htm

 

6 STEPS FOR A GOOD CONFESSION

  1. Examine your conscience – what sins have you committed since your last good confession.
  2. Be sincerely sorry for your sins.
  3. Confess your sins to the priest.
  4. Make certain that you confess all your mortal sins and the number of them.
  5. After your confession, do the penance the priest gives to you.
  6. Pray daily for the strength to avoid the occasion of sin, especially for those sins you were just absolved from.

 

ACT OF CONTRITIONO my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended You, and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of Heaven and the pains of Hell, but most of all because they offend You, my God, Who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
Amen.

 


 

FIRST COMMANDMENT
“I am the Lord your God. You shall not have strange gods before Me.” (Ex 20:2,3)
 


Worth Revisiting: Development and negation: the struggle continues

May 7, 2011

Development and negation: the struggle continues

 

The latest installment in my “Development and Negation” series was about slavery. More specifically, the question was whether the development of Magisterial teaching on the moral status of slavery negates any previously taught doctrine that meets the Church’s own criteria for irreformability. My answer was, of course, no—as it has been in every case where dissenters of the right or the left charge the Magisterium with discrediting itself by contradicting itself over time. What I shall do here is illustrate the significance of the general topic by presenting what happened to the debate over the slavery question.
The critic against whom I have lately defended the Magisterium was theologian Joseph O’Leary, an unreconstructed prog of a kind all too familiar on ostensibly Catholic theology faculties. The original target of his criticisms was Avery Cardinal Dulles, who had addressed the slavery issue among others in his article “Development or Reversal?” In criticizing my own position on the slavery issue, which accords with Dulles’, O’Leary repeats a charge he has made in almost every debate he and I have had in the past: “Liccione has devoted huge intellectual effort to proving that the Church has never reversed its official teaching on any point of morality.” As anybody who reads my series can verify for themselves, however, that is not what I have devoted effort to proving. I have openly acknowledged cases in which Church authorities have reversed their application of moral principles to specific moral questions, such as how heretics may be punished, whether borrowers may ever be charged for loans beyond the principal, and when the death penalty can be justified. What I have instead sought to show is that no moral tenet taught by the Church in such wise as to meet her own criteria for irreformability has thereby been repudiated. Tenets that do meet such criteria are, to be sure, sometimes wrongly applied; others take time to be recognized and formulated for what they are. That is why development and refinement in Catholic moral teaching are both possible and necessary. But my thesis has been that such development and refinement do not entail negation of any tenet taught in the past with the Church’s full authority. Tenets so taught are infallibly taught and are thus “irreformable,” meaning “not to be contradicted.” So the Church does not contradict or negate them. What’s happened in my debate with O’Leary well illustrates the importance of that point.

In his last comment here on my slavery post, O’Leary proceeds in characteristic fashion by throwing in everything but the kitchen sink. I had claimed, as an aside, that magisterial support in the Middle Ages for the physical punishment of heretics—such as the papal bull Ad Extirpanda—did not meet the Church’s own criteria for irreformability. I have made that claim before, and I’ve made it because AE’s subject matter was not any irreformable moral tenet, but rather a prudential judgment on the specific, very time-bound question whether the good of the body politic requires that heretics be physically coerced into confessing their heresies. Those who exercise magisterial authority, including popes, can be wrong about that without logically discrediting their own claims to teach infallibly, and thus irreformably, about “faith and morals” under certain conditions. In this case medieval ecclesiastics, including St. Thomas Aquinas, were wrong about the socio-political importance and necessity of torturing heretics. I’ve explained why before, but I don’t want to distract readers any further by getting into that again. Here, rather, is what O’Leary says in response to my claim that “Ad Extirpanda does not satisfy the Church’s own criteria for the infallibility of the ordinary magisterium”:

 

Do you refer to the papal teaching office or the universal teaching office of bishops, which is usually what people mean when they talk of the ordinary magisterium? As far as I know there are only 2 candidates for infallibility of the former, namely the dogmas of 1854 and 1950. I tend to follow G. Hallett SJ in thinking the claim of infallibility to be meaningless (thus neither true nor false), The infallibility of bishops is a Bellarminian thesis unwisely embraced, without disucssion, by the bishops at Vatican II and ruthless exploited since then to claim infallibility for Vaticanist doctrines on contraception, women’s ordination etc., at the very time as any autonomous teaching authority of bishops is beiing undercut.

Let’s leave aside the rather elementary point that the “ordinary” magisterium of the Church is not to be contrasted with the “papal” magisterium but rather with the “extraordinary” magisterium. Either the pope or the bishops can and do exercise either magisterium (though the bishops can only do so legitimately in communion with the pope). It’s bad enough that O’Leary, an ostensibly Catholic theologian, has missed that. But he’s actually suggesting that the dogma of papal infallibility is “meaningless” and asserting that the doctrine of the infallibility of bishops, authoritatively taught in Lumen Gentium 25, is “a Bellarminian thesis unwisely embraced, without disucssion [sic], by the bishops at Vatican II.” Again, let’s leave aside the irony that a theologian who signs himself “Spirit of Vatican II” is rejecting a very important ecclesiological doctrine authoritatively taught by the Fathers of Vatican II. O’Leary is out to end the game before it starts.

If the dogma of papal infallibility is “meaningless” and the infallibility of the bishops, as explained in LG §25, a mere thesis “unwisely embraced,” then the question whether the Church’s development of doctrine has ever negated an irreformably taught doctrine cannot be usefully debated. Before that question can be usefully debated, there must be some agreement among the participants both that there are infallibly taught doctrines and that there are consistently applicable criteria for identifying doctrines as such. For reasons I’ve given, the class of “infallible” doctrines is co-extensive with that of “irreformable” ones. Among Catholic theologians who care about teaching with and in the name of the Church, such agreement holds in substance, if not always at the margins. But between me and O’Leary, it does not hold in any sense at all. So, we do not even agree on the premises of the discussion. Perhaps that is why O’Leary consistently misrepresents what I aim to do.

The only useful strategy for the O’Learys of the world—and their name is legion—would be to argue that the historic development of Catholic doctrine precludes any doctrine of magisterial infallibility (ordinary or extraordinary, papal or episcopal) that could be (a) meaningful, (b) useful, and (c) definitively held. If there is no such doctrine of infallibility, then the question which tenets count as irreformable is purely a matter of opinion, and my “development and negation” project is not worth pursuing. That is roughly the tack Hans Küng took in his once-celebrated book Infallible? An Inquiry. A debate about his argumentative strategy is worth having because it can be settled by facts and logic. As I read Küng’s book and researched his sources three decades ago, my debate with him was gradually settled. I concluded his case was not compelling on either historical or logical grounds. More important, I soon realized that if he were right, then the claims of the Catholic Magisterium to be preserved from error under certain conditions are so much hot air. In that case, there would be no compelling reason to remain in full communion with Rome, other than to undermine her claims from within.

That, I suspect, is the real point of the O’Learys of the world.


May 5: Blessed Caterina Cittadini

May 5, 2011

Blessed Caterina Cittadini, 1801 – 1857 Read the rest of this entry »

May 4: Saint Richard Reynolds, Martyr Of England

May 4, 2011

Saint Richard Reynolds, 1492-1535 Read the rest of this entry »


Prophet Jeremiah

May 1, 2011


May 1: Saint Joseph The Worker

May 1, 2011


April 22: Blessed Maria Gabriella Sagghedu

April 21, 2011

gabriella4.JPG.jpg

 Blessed Maria Gabriella Sagghedu,

See that God Has Shown Us His Face

Last Thursday, 18 April 2008, Pope Benedict XVI spoke at the Ecumenical Prayer Service held in Saint Joseph’s Church in New York City. Tomorrow the monastic calendar will commemorate a woman whose life illustrates much of what the Holy Father said. Celebrating the saints is integral to what Pope Benedict XVI calls “diachronic koinonia — communion with the Church in every age” that saves us from the narrow uncatholic perspective of the immediate here and now of a given local community.

An Offering to the Father

Blessed Maria Gabriella Sagghedu, a Cistercian nun of Grottaferrata in Italy, died on April 23rd in 1939. Pope John Paul II beatified her in 1983. In his encyclical on Christian Unity, Ut Unum Sint, he presented her again to the whole Church as a model of “the total and unconditional offering of one’s life to the Father, through the Son, in the Holy Spirit.”

Pope Benedict XVI said last Thursday that, “we must first recall that the unity of the Church flows from the perfect oneness of the triune God. In John’s Gospel, we are told that Jesus prayed to his Father that his disciples might be one, “just as you are in me and I am in you” (Jn 17:21). This passage reflects the unwavering conviction of the early Christian community that its unity was both caused by, and is reflective of, the unity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.” Blessed Maria Gabriella offered her life that the unity of the Three Divine Persons might one day be manifested perfectly in the community of believers that is the Church.

Silence Turned to Praise

Blessed Maria Gabriella is one of those who, like the Blessed Virgin Mary, having heard the Word, held it in silence: in the silence of awe; in the silence that confesses God present; in the silence that allows the Word to sink into the deep and secret places of the heart. For Maria-Gabriella, this silence turned to praise: a praise that she found expressed in the priestly prayer of Christ given in the seventeenth chapter of Saint John’s Gospel. At the end of her life she murmured: “I cannot say but these words, ‘My God, your Glory.’”

A Discerning Abbess

mpia.jpg

The Trappist Cistercian monastery of Grottaferrata (moved to Vitorchiano in 1957) was governed by Mother Maria Pia Gulini (1892–1959), an intelligent and discerning abbess with a broad vision of all things Catholic. She corresponded with the Abbé Paul Couturier (1881–1953), the Apostle of Christian Unity. The Italian abbess nurtured a passion for Christian Unity and communicated that passion to her community. Maria Gabriella was receptive to Mother Gulini’s spiritual teaching. Inspired by the Holy Spirit, she asked permission of her abbess to offer her life for the Unity of Christians. The Father accepted her offering, drawing her into the prayer of Christ and into His sacrifice.

The Priestly Prayer of Christ

Blessed Maria Gabriella’s monastic life was brief; she entered the abbey of Grottaferrata in 1935 and died in 1939. She suffered from tuberculosis for fifteen months. The Bridegroom Christ came for her at the hour of the evening sacrifice on Good Shepherd Sunday. The Gospel of Mass that day had been from Saint John: “There will be one fold, and one shepherd” (Jn 10:16). After her death, her little New Testament, worn from use, opened by itself to the seventeenth chapter of Saint John’s Gospel. The pages of Jesus’ priestly prayer, so often touched by Madre Maria Gabriella’s feverish hands, had become almost transparent.

Holding Fast to Sound Teaching

Pope Benedict XVI said: “Only by “holding fast” to sound teaching (2 Thess 2:15; cf. Rev 2:12-29) will we be able to respond to the challenges that confront us in an evolving world. Only in this way will we give unambiguous testimony to the truth of the Gospel and its moral teaching. This is the message which the world is waiting to hear from us. Like the early Christians, we have a responsibility to give transparent witness to the “reasons for our hope”, so that the eyes of all men and women of goodwill may be opened to see that God has shown us his face (cf. 2 Cor 3:12-18) and granted us access to his divine life through Jesus Christ. He alone is our hope! God has revealed his love for all peoples through the mystery of his Son’s passion and death, and has called us to proclaim that he is indeed risen, has taken his place at the right hand of the Father, and “will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead” (Nicene Creed).”

Blessed Maria Gabriella held fast to the sound teaching she received from the Church through her family, her parish, and her monastic community. She bore witness to the objective truth that she experienced in the daily round of liturgical prayer to which she was faithful as long as her health allowed her to go choir. When that was no longer possible, she continued to bear witness to the objective truth actualized in the sacred liturgy by uniting herself to the Sacrifice of the Mass from her sick bed.

Madre Maria Gabriella’s humble and hidden life was itself a demonstration of the “reasons for our hope.” She contemplated the Face of God in Christ, and offered herself in sacrifice so that all Christians might find in the Catholic Church the place wherein the glory of God shining on the Face of Christ illumines all things and draws them into unity.

Unity

Blessed Maria Gabriella’s offering for Christian Unity witnesses to the fundamental thrust of every monastic life. Monastic conversion is a movement from the divided, fragmented self to the whole self, healed and unified in the love of Christ. The restoration of unity is the great monastic work; it is also the end and fruit of participation in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Saint Thomas Aquinas teaches that the end proper to the sacrament of the Eucharist is the unity of the Mystical Body. Blessed Maria Gabriella, pray for us that we may go to the altar, letting go of the things that damage the unity of the Body of Christ, and ready to receive the gifts by which unity is repaired.


Where In The World Are You?

April 20, 2011

Locations of visitors to this page

Fr Zuhlsdorf did this on his blog.

Even if you only read and do not leave comments, I would like to know where you call home. Leave a comment with the town and country.

Where in the world are you?

March 19: Saint Joseph

March 19, 2011


80 YEARS LATER: TIME on Birth Control

January 26, 2011

So where are we today?

Monday, Jan. 26, 1931

Birth Control

The American Birth Control League invited 30 Protestant Episcopal bishops to its convention in Manhattan last week. Not one bishop appeared, although their Triennial General Convention at Denver next September is certain to consider birth control in echo to the last Lambeth Conference of bishops of and affiliated with the Church of England, which discreetly approved the movement (TIME, July 14 & Aug. 25). Nonetheless there were several preachers of various denominations among the 200 delegates who attended the convention. Also-present were a few doctors. Conspicuously absent were women who revel in tales of their own childbearing, women too prudish to discuss procreation in any manner, Catholic women obedient to the Pope’s denunciation of any hindrance to conception (TIME, Jan. 19). Last week’s meeting lacked the vigor of previous conventions. Some speakers interpreted the Pope’s denunciatory encyclical as favorable to birth control. “It paves the way for the inevitable fight over what is one of the most important biological findings in history”—Professor Julian Sorell Huxley of London. Other speakers and a formal resolution politely denounced the recent White House Conference on Child Health & Protection (TIME, Dec. 1) for not mentioning birth control at all. Dr. Ira Solomon Wile of Manhattan called the White House Conference “a total, a complete and excellently devised demonstration of an ostrich policy. This is unjust to the ostrich, however, as it does not bury its head quite so deeply.” Otherwise the birth controllers were placid. They reiterated an old boast that their movement has been endorsed by various sectional conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the Congregational Churches of Connecticut, the Universalist “General Convention, the American Unitarian Association, the Lambeth Conference. During ten years of formal organization Birth Control has developed an American League, state leagues in Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Pennsylvania; local groups in California. Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Maryland. North Carolina and Ohio; a Committee for Federal Legislation on Birth Control: and 58 big-city clinics for contraceptive advice.


Marian Prayer Of Saint Gregory Of Narek (A.D. 1010)

November 12, 2010
MARIAN PRAYER OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAREK (A.D. 1010)

Assist me by the wings of your prayers,
O you who are called the Mother of the living,
so that on my exit from this valley of tears
I may be able to advance without torment
to the dwelling of life
that has been prepared for us
to lighten the end of a life burdened by my iniquity.

Healer of the sorrows of Eve,
change my day of anguish into a feast of gladness.
Be my Advocate,
ask and supplicate.
For as I believe in your inexpressible purity,
so do I also believe in
the good reception that is given to your word.

O you who are blessed among women,
help me with your tears
for I am in danger.
Bend the knee to obtain my reconciliation,
O Mother of God.

Be solicitous for me for I am miserable, Read the rest of this entry »


The Ordinariate as the Church’s front porch

October 23, 2010

It is perhaps a bit premature, but I’ve been thinking for years that a new Anglican body within the Catholic Church will bring with it to Peter’s barque more than tasteful vestments and glorious formal hymnody and a sense for the  quaint and antiquated. It will bring fishers of men.

 

That has been my hope and it seems to be confirmed here and there that evangelization will be its mission.  Catholicism in English speaking lands Read the rest of this entry »


On Priesthood…

September 18, 2010

We are the imposters

who speak the truth.

The unknown men

whom all men know.

Dying

we live on.

Disciplined by suffering

we are done to death.

In our sorrow

we have always cause for joy.

Poor ourselves

we bring wealth to many.

Penniless

we own the world.

–Fr. James Burtchael, CSC


For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

August 16, 2010

For The Repose Of The Soul Of Elvis Presley

No one who sings of Her rosary should be forgotten in death. Say one Hail Mary for Elvis.

See also: Roman Miscellany: Five Catholic Facts About Elvis


2 Years Later: Eritrean Woman In Prison Dies Of Malaria

July 23, 2010

As reported: Wednesday July 23, 2008
ERITREA: CHRISTIAN WOMAN IN PRISON DIES OF MALARIA
Weakened by torture, Azib Simon succumbs to disease only a week after contracting it.

LOS ANGELES, July 23 (Compass Direct News) – Imprisoned and tortured for her Christian faith since December, 37-year-old Azib Simon died of malaria in Eritrea’s Wi’a Military Training Center last week. Weakened by ongoing torture, sources said, Simon contracted malaria only a week before she died. Christians in the prison are rarely given medical attention, and the sources said authorities refused to provide treatment for Simon’s malaria. She had attended the Kale-Hiwet Church in Assab, one of the independent evangelical churches that have been targeted by the country’s Marxist-leaning authoritarian regime. She was held at the notorious Wi’a Military Training Center, 20 miles south of the Red Sea port of Massawa, since her arrest in December 2007. On June 8 Compass learned that eight Christian brothers held at the Adi-Quala prison were taken to the medical emergency facilities as a result of torture by military personnel at the camp. Simon’s death makes a total of five Christians whom Compass has confirmed have died in Eritrean prisons after being tortured for refusing to recant their faith.

Pray for the repose of the soul of Azib Simon and those who would allow such an evil thing to come to pass.


Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

July 10, 2010

Happy Birthday Carolina Cannonball!

Visit The Crescat and wish her well!

 
 
 
 

You Would Think Christ Would Have A Better Monitor

June 19, 2010


Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins

June 3, 2010

 Guide for Examination of Conscience for Confession of SinsGuide for
Examination of Conscience for Confession of Sins 

  SOURCE: http://www.scborromeo.org/confess.htm

 

6 STEPS FOR A GOOD CONFESSION

  1. Examine your conscience – what sins have you committed since your last good confession.
  2. Be sincerely sorry for your sins.
  3. Confess your sins to the priest.
  4. Make certain that you confess all your mortal sins and the number of them.
  5. After your confession, do the penance the priest gives to you.
  6. Pray daily for the strength to avoid the occasion of sin, especially for those sins you were just absolved from.

 

ACT OF CONTRITIONO my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended You, and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of Heaven and the pains of Hell, but most of all because they offend You, my God, Who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
Amen.

 


 

FIRST COMMANDMENT
“I am the Lord your God. You shall not have strange gods before Me.” (Ex 20:2,3)
 


May 24: Blessed Juan de Prado

May 24, 2010


Blessed Juan de Prado, 1563 – 1631
Spanish Franciscan priest, missionary and martyr in Morocco.


May 23: Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski

May 23, 2010


Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski, 1869 – 1940


May 22: Saint Michael Ho Dinh Hy

May 22, 2010

Saint Michael Ho Dinh Hy, 1808 – 1857 Read the rest of this entry »


Father Jacques Marqette, May 18

May 18, 2010

Father Marquette preachingFather Jacques Marquette

Laon, France, June 1o, 1637 – May 18, 1675, Ludington, MI

Father Jacques Marquette SJ, sometimes known as Pere Marquette, was a French missionary who founded Michigan’s first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first non-Native Americans to see and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

Jacques Marquette was born in Laon, France, on June 1, 1637 and joined the Society of Jesus at age seventeen. After working and teaching in France for several years, he was dispatched to Quebec in 1666 to preach to the Native Americans, where he showed great proficiency in the local languages, especially Huron. In 1668 Father Marquette (French: Père Marquette) was redeployed by his superiors to missions farther up the St. Lawrence River in the western Great Lakes. He worked at Sault Ste. Marie and at the Mission of the Holy Spirit in La Pointe, on Lake Superior, near the present-day city of Ashland, Wisconsin. Here, he came into contact with members of the Illinois tribes, who told him of the existence of the Mississippi River and invited him to come teach further south. Because of wars between the Hurons at La Pointe and the neighboring Dakota people, however, Father Marquette had to relocate to the Straits of Mackinac; he informed his superiors about the rumored river and requested permission to explore it.

Leave was granted, and in 1673, Marquette was joined by Louis Joliet, a French Canadian explorer. They departed from St. Ignace on May 17, with two canoes and five other voyageurs of French-Indian ancestry. They followed Lake Michigan to the Bay of Green Bay and up the Fox River. From there, they portaged to the Wisconsin River, which they were told led to the river they sought. On June 17, they entered the Mississippi near Prairie du Chien.

The Joliet-Marquette expedition traveled to within 435 miles (700 km) of the Gulf of Mexico but turned back at the mouth of the Arkansas River. By this point they had encountered several natives carrying European trinkets, and they feared an encounter with explorers or colonists from Spain.[2] They followed the Mississippi back to the mouth of the Illinois River, which they learned from local natives was a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. They returned to Lake Michigan near the location of modern-day Chicago. Marquette stopped at the mission of St. Francis Xavier in Green Bay in September, while Joliet returned to Quebec to relate the news of their discoveries.

Marquette and his party returned to the Illinois Territory in late 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in what would become the city of Chicago. In the spring of 1675, the missionary again paddled westward and celebrated a public Mass at the Grand Village of the Illinois near Starved Rock. A bout of dysentery picked up during the Mississippi expedition, however, had sapped his health. On the return trip to St. Ignace, he died near the modern town of Ludington, Michigan.

The Michigan Historical Marker at this location reads:

Father Marquette Memorial Father Jacques Marquette, the great Jesuit missionary and explorer, died and was buried by two French companions somewhere along the Lake Michigan shore on May 18, 1675. He had been returning to his mission at St. Ignace which he had left in 1673 to go exploring in the Mississippi country. The exact location of his death has long been a subject of controversy. A spot close to the southeast slope of this hill, near the ancient outlet of the Pere Marquette River, corresponds with the death site as located by early French accounts and maps and a constant tradition of the past. Marquette’s remains were reburied at St. Ignace in 1677. ”

His grave is now located at what is currently the Ojibway Museum on State Street in downtown St. Ignace. Father Marquette is memorialized in several towns and rivers that bear his name (such as Marquette, Michigan), as well as the Father Marquette National Memorial near St. Ignace. Pere Marquette State Park near Grafton, Illinois, is located at the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and is the site where Indians of the Illini Confederation showed Marquette a faster return route to the Great Lakes.

SOURCE


May 17: Blessed Giulia Salzano

May 17, 2010

Blessed Giulia Salzano, 1846 – 1929 Read the rest of this entry »


May 5: Blessed Nunzio Sulprizio

May 5, 2010
Blessed Nunzio Sulprizio, 1817 -1836 Read the rest of this entry »

Saint Augustine Webster, Martyr Of England

May 4, 2010

Saint Augustine Webster, +1535 Read the rest of this entry »

May 2: Blessed Stanislas Kazimierczyk

May 3, 2010

Blessed Stanislas Kazimierczyk, 1433 – 1489 Read the rest of this entry »


How a Maryknoll Father Saved Japan

May 2, 2010

How a Maryknoll Father Saved Japan by Iosue Andreas  

This is a very interesting history — Patrick Byrne and Gerard Hammond: apostles of peace in Pyongyang. From the article, the story:

    It was the afternoon of August 15, 1945, and in Tokyo the staff of the newspaper Asahi were in a state of grave uncertainty. A few hours earlier, the emperor, in a message to the nation, had declared the end of the war and had exhorted all to “bear the unbearable”. The “unbearable” was unconditional surrender. The aircraft carrier Missouri was heading toward the bay of Tokyo. The population had to be prepared, to keep them from being overcome by panic. Above all, the fate of the women was a source of concern.

    It was urgent to find a personality who would be able to influence the parties in such a way that the occupation would take place in an orderly manner. A journalist, Miyamoto, thought of the Catholic Church. He was not a Christian, but he had heard his daughter, who was a Catholic, talk about the Church of Rome. His colleagues approved the proposal, and Miyamoto, Read the rest of this entry »


May 1: Saint Joseph The Worker

May 1, 2010


Worth Revisiting: I AM DIVINE, YOU ARE DE BRANCHES

April 30, 2010

I AM DIVINE, YOU ARE DE BRANCHES by Fr. V. 

 

A couple of weeks ago I stumbles across a radio program to which I used to listen. It might be of some interest to you too so here is a link to the archived show. As you can see it is in three acts the last act (entitled Nuns Amok) is the one about which this post is concerned.

It recounts the destruction an order of Glenmary Sisters. Most interestingly for this program (which is not necessarily at all Catholic friendly) it traces their dissolution through the letting go of their vows one by one. First was obedience. They did not want to be answerable to “the Church” Read the rest of this entry »


Worth Revisiting: Predictions and Fulfillment

April 29, 2010

Predictions and Fulfillment

By Leon Suprenant | April 28, 2008

In last month’s column, I surveyed several writers who viewed the Sexual Revolution and predicted dire effects, and I concluded with the predictions of Pope Paul VI in his 1968 encyclical, Humanae Vitae. The Holy Father suffered greatly and was widely rejected for his statements, but the others experienced no such effects.  So, why was Pope Paul VI verbally crucified for his predictions while the others suffered no such consequences?

I think the reason why Pope Paul VI was vilified is that he spoke in the name of God and His Church.  He didn’t just offer personal opinion like the others.  He taught with authority: “Nonetheless the Church, calling men back to the observance of the norms of the natural law, as interpreted by its constant doctrine, teaches that each and every marriage act must remain open to the transmission of life” (Humanae Vitae, no. 11). 

The Sexual Revolution was in full swing in 1968.  Crazy theories about love, marriage, and sexuality abounded.  And here was the Pope teaching that marital contraception is “intrinsically dishonest” (no. 14).  Led by a handful of liberal priests, a revolution was organized within the Church against the teaching of Humanae Vitae, and it was quickly institutionalized.  The explicit teaching of our Savior that each of us must take up our cross daily was implicitly denied with regard to sexuality.

Today we are experiencing the consequences of this revolution. The Boston scandals (and they are not unique to Boston) are too widely known to be ignored; Pope Benedict XVI alluded to them several times in his recent visit to America.  One might ask:  Is there a connection between the sins of the vast majority of married Catholics who use unnatural forms of birth control and the sins of a very small minority of the clergy who Read the rest of this entry »


The Gospel of Mark as the Memoirs of Peter

April 25, 2010

 

The Gospel of Mark as the Memoirs of Peter

Published Friday, April 25, 2008 by Taylor Marshall | E-mail this post

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The Church historian Eusebius quoted a fragment from Papias concerning the the origin and authorship of the Gospel of Mark in Hist. Eccl. (3, 39):

“And the presbyter said this. Mark having become the interpreter of Peter, wrote down accurately whatsoever he remembered. It was not, however, in exact order that he related the sayings or deeds of Christ. For he neither heard the Lord nor accompanied Him. But afterwards, as I said, he accompanied Peter, who accommodated his instructions to the necessities [of his hearers], but with no intention of giving a regular narrative of the Lord’s sayings.

Wherefore Mark made no mistake in thus writing some things as he remembered them. For of one thing he took especial care, not to omit anything he had heard, and not to put anything fictitious into the statements.”

This is what is related by Papias regarding Mark.

SOURCE: http://cantuar.blogspot.com/2008/04/gospel-of-mark-as-memoirs-of-peter.html


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