Mary: Mediatrix? Isn’t Jesus the ONE Mediator?

July 31, 2009

Q. The Catholic Bible says there is but one mediator between God and man. But the church designates Mary as a mediator. Is this not adding to the Word of God.

A . Jesus is the ONE mediator between God and man. If a mother prays for a wayward son, she is mediating on behalf of that son. And if God hears her prayers, that does not detract from the mediation of Christ. And as she can pray for her son, the Mother of Christ and the saints can pray for us.

And when they do it, it is Jesus mediating for us, for it is Jesus in them Who is doing so. You lack understanding of Christian doctrine. Christians, whether in Heaven or on Earth, are the members of Christ. He identifies Himself with them.

When Saul persecuted the Christians, Jesus said to him, “Why do you persecute Me?” So, if the sufferings and persecutions of the saints are His sufferings; the intercession of the saints is another form of His intercession.

We Catholics believe in the Communion of the Saints; the common union of all saints in Christ. Protestants say that they believe in the Communion of Saints, but diligently exclude all actual union with them. Catholics at least are conscious of belonging to the great family of God’s children, and do not insist on being strangers to all with whom they will be associated in Heaven. (Radio Replies)

Q. That all seems reasonable but still, to me, it seems to oppose the spirit of the Gospel that proposes Christ as the only Mediator.

A. Christ is the one principal Mediator. But He Himself chooses to dispense His mediation through secondary agents.

There is but one Queen of England, but that does not deny the existence of officials to whom the royal power is delegated. If fifty officials act in the name of the Queen, that does not make fifty Queens. there is still only ONE QUEEN.

For instance, Christ delegated His power to Priests and, as the one Mediator, acts through many channels. St. Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “Let a man so account of us as of the ministers of Christ, and the dispensers of the mysteries of God.” I Cor. 4:1.


Ambrosian Rite

July 31, 2009

This came from an Italian website dedicated to the Ambrosian (Milanese) Latin Rite. I had no idea what it was all about so I enquired over at Catholic Answers Forums.

 

I am told: The flaming ball is lit during the feast of the patron saint and martyr. It is called ‘il faro” (the lighthouse???) It is a globe covered with a cotton fibers (decorated with cross, palms, and crown) and it is hung at the entrance of the presbiterium. It is the symbol of the life consumed by the love of Christ at the moment of martyrdom.

 

 

 

 

 


Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, July 31

July 31, 2009

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski

Blessed Michal Ozieblowski, Priest and Martyr
Izdebno, Poland, September 28, 1900 – Dachau, Germany, July 31, 1942

Michal Ozieblowski, priest of the Archdiocese of Warsaw, fell victim of the Nazis in the famous German concentration camp at Dachau. Pope John Paul II on June 13, 1999 raised him to the honors of the altar with 107 other victims of that persecution.

Roman Martyrology: Near Monaco of Bavaria in Germany in the prison camp at Dachau, Blessed Michael Oziębłowski, Priest and Martyr, who, deported to his faith in a foreign prison in Poland, his homeland, forced under an enemy of religion, brought to completion martyred under torture.

Source: Santi e Beati


The Cult of Personality

July 31, 2009

The Cult of Personality has struck again and I’m nervous. Obama is attempting to force through way too much legislation that nobody has read, reviewed or understands. I don’t want to be forced to die when someone decides I’m no longer necessary; on his staff is someone who at one time advocated forced sterilization even though that has already been ruled on by the courts and you can’t do it. Read the rest of this entry »


Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, July 30

July 30, 2009

Blessed Pazo Cid Sergio

Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, Salesian Priest and Martyr
Allariz, Spain, April 24, 1884 – Barcelona, Spain, July 30, 1936

Roman Martyrology: In Barcelona, Spain, Blessed Sergio Pazo Cid, a Priest of the Salesian Society and Martyr, who, during a time of persecution, died for his courageous witness of faith.

Born in Allariz (Orense) April 24, 1884. From the time he was small, he intuited his vocation. He did his seminary studies at Sarria (Barcelona), professing his vows in 1905. His was an exemplary life. All spoke of him with great respect and almost reverence for the goodness in everything he did. A tireless worker, he spent almost his entire life as a pastoral charge of Sarria. He was forced to leave his college in Sama July 22, 1936, sought refuge and was recognized and denounced. Stopped, he did not deny his condition: “Yes, I am a Salesian priest.” He was shot on July 30.

Beatified on March 11, 2001 by Pope John Paul II, together with 232 other Martyrs of the Diocese of Valencia.

Source: Salesians


Patriarch Kirill against Independent Ukraine Church

July 30, 2009

patriarch kirilWith regard to independent church in Ukraine, Patriarch Kirill says “I’m against it.”

By MARIA DANILOVA

The Associated Press

Monday, July 27, 2009; 1:06 PM

KIEV, Ukraine — The head of the Russian Orthodox Church rejected calls from Ukraine’s president to create a local Orthodox church that would be independent from Moscow, saying he firmly supports the status quo.

Patriarch Kirill arrived in Ukraine for a prolonged visit, which observers say is aimed at reasserting Moscow’s religious and political influence over this predominantly Orthodox nation of 46 million, which is trying to integrate with the West.

President Viktor Yushchenko has led a campaign to win recognition of a separatist church that broke away from the Moscow Patriarchate in the 1990s.

“The main aspiration of the Ukrainian people is to live in a united, self-governing Apostolic Orthodox church,” Yushchenko said in a speech, standing alongside Kirill.

Kirill was quick to stress that the dominant Orthodox church in Ukraine, which answers to Moscow, is the only legitimate church here.

“This church, Mr. President, already exists,” Kirill said. “If it didn’t exist today, Ukraine wouldn’t exist either.”

“But wounds have formed in this church and these wounds must be healed,” he said.

The two leaders made the statements after laying flowers at a memorial commemorating the victims of a 1932-33 famine that killed millions which was engineered by Soviet authorities to abolish private land ownership.

Yushchenko is also leading a campaign to win recognition of the famine as an act of genocide; Moscow counters that the campaign was not aimed specifically at Ukrainians.

Kirill said that he mourns the tragedy and prays for all those who perished, but stressed that other ethnic groups, including Russians, also suffered.

The Russian Orthodox Church, as well as the Kremlin, worry about losing dominance in Ukraine.

The mainstream, Moscow-aligned church claims about 28 million believers, while the separatist Ukrainian Orthodox Church Kiev Patriarchate claims about 14 million followers. Opinion polls show the splinter church’s popularity is growing.

Earlier Monday, Kirill led a service on St. Volodymyr Hill in central Kiev near the statue of Prince Volodymyr, who launched the Slavic world’s conversion to Christianity in 988. Kirill called for friendship, brotherhood and unity.

Yushchenko, who has sought to break free from Russia’s centuries-old political dominance and integrate with the European Union and NATO, has appealed to the spiritual leader of the world’s 250 million Orthodox believers, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople, to recognize the separatist church.

Bartholomew, who visited Kiev last summer, has not given a clear response.

Kirill is to visit a number of Ukrainian cities during a prolonged visit that his office says is devoted strictly to pilgrimage. But observers note that his trips to such strongholds of pro-Russian support as the eastern coal-mining city of Donetsk and the port of Sevastopol on the Crimean peninsula have clear political undertones.

Before Kirill led the prayers, a group of nationalist activists shouting “Moscow priest get out!” briefly scuffled with his supporters near the St. Volodymyr Hill. The scuffle was broken up by police.


Fundamenta Option Morality

July 29, 2009


Q. Isn’t it true that once we have chosen to follow God we cannot break off our relationship to him except by a direct and specific rejection of Him? For instance, we cannot commit a grave sin as long as we do not consciously say in our hearts, “I reject you God”.

A. That is not true. This error is strongly condemned in Pope John Paul II’s 1993,
The Splendor of Truth.
If we willfully and knowingly engage in a seriously sinful act, then we have deliberately disobeyed and indirectly rejected God.

CCC-1472 To understand this doctrine and practice of the Church, it is necessary to understand that sin has a double consequence. Grave sin deprives us of communion with God and therefore makes us incapable of eternal life, the privation of which is called the “eternal punishment” of sin. On the other hand every sin, even venial, entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures, which must be purified either here on earth, or after death in the state called Purgatory. This purification frees one from what is called the “temporal punishment” of sin. These two punishments must not be conceived of as a kind of vengeance inflicted by God from without, but as following from the very nature of sin. A conversion which proceeds from a fervent charity can attain the complete purification of the sinner in such a way that no punishment would remain.

CCC-1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God.

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